commonplace

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com·mon·place

 (kŏm′ən-plās′)
adj.
1. Ordinary; common: a period when labor strikes were commonplace.
2. Uninteresting; unremarkable: "his disappointment at finding his child so commonplace" (Jane Stevenson).
n.
1.
a. A trite or obvious saying; a platitude: "the solidified commonplaces of established wisdom" (John Simon).
b. Something, especially an occurrence, that is ordinary or common: "These stories dealt only with the commonplaces of life" (Jack London).
2. Archaic A passage marked for reference or entered in a commonplace book.

[Translation of Latin locus commūnis, generally applicable literary passage, translation of Greek koinos topos.]

commonplace

(ˈkɒmənˌpleɪs)
adj
1. ordinary; everyday: commonplace duties.
2. dull and obvious; trite: commonplace prose.
n
3. something dull and trite, esp a remark; platitude; truism
4. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a passage in a book marked for inclusion in a commonplace book, etc
5. an ordinary or common thing
[C16: translation of Latin locus commūnis argument of wide application, translation of Greek koinos topos]
ˈcommonˌplaceness n

com•mon•place

(ˈkɒm ənˌpleɪs)

adj.
1. ordinary; undistinguished or uninteresting.
2. dull or platitudinous: a commonplace remark.
n.
3. a well-known, customary, or obvious remark; a trite or uninteresting saying; platitude.
4. anything common, ordinary, or uninteresting.
5. Archaic. a place or passage in a book or writing noted as important for reference or quotation.
[1525–35; translation of Latin locus commūnis, itself translation of Greek koinòs tópos]
com′mon•place`ness, n.
syn: commonplace, banal, trite, hackneyed describe words, remarks, and styles of expression that are lifeless and uninteresting. commonplace characterizes expression that is so ordinary, self-evident, or generally accepted as to be boring or pointless: a commonplace affirmation of the obvious. banal often suggests an inane or insipid quality: banal conversation. trite suggests that an expression has lost its force because of excessive repetition: trite poetic imagery. hackneyed is a stronger word implying that the expression has become meaningless from overuse: hackneyed metaphors.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.commonplace - a trite or obvious remark
comment, remark, input - a statement that expresses a personal opinion or belief or adds information; "from time to time she contributed a personal comment on his account"
truism - an obvious truth
Adj.1.commonplace - completely ordinary and unremarkable; "air travel has now become commonplace"; "commonplace everyday activities"
ordinary - not exceptional in any way especially in quality or ability or size or degree; "ordinary everyday objects"; "ordinary decency"; "an ordinary day"; "an ordinary wine"
2.commonplace - not challengingcommonplace - not challenging; dull and lacking excitement; "an unglamorous job greasing engines"
unexciting - not exciting; "an unexciting novel"; "lived an unexciting life"
3.commonplace - repeated too often; overfamiliar through overuse; "bromidic sermons"; "his remarks were trite and commonplace"; "hackneyed phrases"; "a stock answer"; "repeating threadbare jokes"; "parroting some timeworn axiom"; "the trite metaphor `hard as nails'"
unoriginal - not original; not being or productive of something fresh and unusual; "the manuscript contained unoriginal emendations"; "his life had been unoriginal, conforming completely to the given pattern"- Gwethalyn Graham

commonplace

adjective
1. everyday, common, ordinary, widespread, pedestrian, customary, mundane, vanilla (slang), banal, run-of-the-mill, humdrum, dime-a-dozen (informal) Foreign vacations have become commonplace nowadays.
everyday new, interesting, original, novel, strange, exciting, rare, unique, unusual, extraordinary, unfamiliar, uncommon, ground-breaking, infrequent, left-field (informal)
noun
1. cliché, platitude, banality, truism It is a commonplace to say that the poetry of the first world war was greater than that of the second.

commonplace

adjectivenoun
1. A trite expression or idea:
2. A regular or customary matter, condition, or course of events:
Translations
عادي، تافِه، مُبْتَذَل
všední
almindelighverdagsagtigordinær
hversdagslegur

commonplace

[ˈkɒmənpleɪs]
A. ADJ (= normal) → común, normal, corriente (pej) → vulgar, ordinario
it is commonplace to see this sort of thinges frecuente or corriente ver este tipo de cosas
B. N (= event) → cosa f común y corriente; (= statement) → tópico m, lugar m común

commonplace

[ˈkɒmənpleɪs] adjbanal(e), ordinairecommon room n (British) (for students)salle f commune

commonplace

[ˈkɒmənˌpleɪs]
1. adjcomune (pej) → banale, ordinario/a
2. n (statement) → luogo comune

common

(ˈkomən) adjective
1. seen or happening often; quite normal or usual. a common occurrence; These birds are not so common nowadays.
2. belonging equally to, or shared by, more than one. This knowledge is common to all of us; We share a common language.
3. publicly owned. common property.
4. coarse or impolite. She uses some very common expressions.
5. of ordinary, not high, social rank. the common people.
6. of a noun, not beginning with a capital letter (except at the beginning of a sentence). The house is empty.
noun
(a piece of) public land for everyone to use, with few or no buildings. the village common.
ˈcommoner noun
a person who is not of high rank. The royal princess married a commoner.
common knowledge
something known to everyone or to most people. Surely you know that already – it's common knowledge.
common ˈlaw noun
a system of unwritten laws based on old customs and on judges' earlier decisions.
ˈcommon-law adjective
referring to a relationship between two people who are not officially married, but have the same rights as husband and wife. a common-law marriage; a common-law wife/husband.
ˈcommonplace adjective
very ordinary and uninteresting. commonplace remarks.
ˈcommon-room noun
in a college, school etc a sitting-room for the use of a group.
common sense
practical good sense. If he has any common sense he'll change jobs.
the Common Market
(formerly) an association of certain European countries to establish free trade (without duty, tariffs etc) among them, now replaced by the European Union.
the (House of) Commons
the lower house of the British parliament.
in common
(of interests, attitudes, characteristics etc) shared or alike. They have nothing in common – I don't know why they're getting married.
References in classic literature ?
Those formal phrases, the very flower of small-town proprieties, and the flat commonplaces, nearly all hypocritical in their origin, became very funny, very engaging, when they were uttered in Lena's soft voice, with her caressing intonation and arch naivete.
All that is made such a flourish of in the old South Sea Voyages, those things were but the lifetime commonplaces of our heroic Nantucketers.
several commonplaces about my journey, the weather, and so on, uttered in rather a drawling tone: and accompanied by sundry side-glances that measured me from head to foot--now traversing the folds of my drab merino pelisse, and now lingering on the plain trimming of my cottage bonnet.
She had a lively perception of the foibles of others, and no reverence for her seniors, whom she thought dull, cautious, and ridiculously amenable by commonplaces.
And hence bitter enmities had arisen; the professors of knowledge had revenged themselves by calling him a villainous corrupter of youth, and by repeating the commonplaces about atheism and materialism and sophistry, which are the stock-accusations against all philosophers when there is nothing else to be said of them.
Her mere words could have afforded no clue to this aim, but her countenance aided; while her lips uttered only affable commonplaces, her eyes reverted continually to my face.
My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence.
Why, all our art treasures of to-day are only the dug-up commonplaces of three or four hundred years ago.
I was telling Katharine a few little commonplaces about marriage," she said, with a little laugh.
She made scarcely any attempt to listen to what Helen was saying, as Helen indulged in commonplaces to begin with.
Life was so strange and wonderful, filled with an immensity of problems, of dreams, and of heroic toils, and yet these stories dealt only with the commonplaces of life.
As he rarely met Anna, he could say nothing but commonplaces to her, but he said those commonplaces as to when she was returning to Petersburg, and how fond Countess Lidia Ivanovna was of her, with an expression which suggested that he longed with his whole soul to please her and show his regard for her and even more than that.