commune


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

com·mune 1

 (kə-myo͞on′)
intr.v. com·muned, com·mun·ing, com·munes
1. To be in a state of intimate, heightened sensitivity and receptivity, as with one's surroundings: hikers communing with nature.
2. To receive the Eucharist.

[Middle English comunen, to have common dealings with, converse, from Old French communer, to make common, share (from commun, common; see common) and perhaps from Old French communier, to share in the Communion (from Late Latin commūnicāre, from Latin, to communicate; see communicate).]

com·mun′er n.

com·mune 2

 (kŏm′yo͞on′, kə-myo͞on′)
n.
1.
a. A relatively small, often rural community whose members share common interests, work, and income and often own property collectively.
b. The people in such a community.
2. The smallest local political division of various European countries, governed by a mayor and municipal council.
3.
a. A local community organized with a government for promoting local interests.
b. A municipal corporation in the Middle Ages.
4. often Commune
a. The revolutionary group that controlled the government of Paris from 1789 to 1794.
b. The insurrectionary, socialist government that controlled Paris from March 18 to May 28, 1871.

[French, independent municipality, from Old French comugne, from Medieval Latin commūnia, community, from neuter of Latin commūnis, common; see mei- in Indo-European roots.]

commune

vb
1. to talk or converse intimately
2. to experience strong emotion or spiritual feelings (for): to commune with nature.
n
intimate conversation; exchange of thoughts; communion
[C13: from Old French comuner to hold in common, from comun common]

commune

(kəˈmjuːn)
vb
(Ecclesiastical Terms) (intr) Christianity chiefly US to partake of Communion
[C16: back formation from communion]

commune

(ˈkɒmjuːn)
n
1. (Sociology) a group of families or individuals living together and sharing possessions and responsibilities
2. any small group of people having common interests or responsibilities
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the smallest administrative unit in Belgium, France, Italy, and Switzerland, governed by a mayor and council
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the government or inhabitants of a commune
5. (Historical Terms) a medieval town enjoying a large degree of autonomy
[C18: from French, from Medieval Latin commūnia, from Latin: things held in common, from commūnis common]

Commune

(ˈkɒmjuːn)
n
1. (Historical Terms) See Paris Commune
2. (Historical Terms) a committee that governed Paris during the French Revolution and played a leading role in the Reign of Terror: suppressed 1794

com•mune1

(v. kəˈmyun; n. ˈkɒm yun)

v. -muned, -mun•ing,
n. v.i.
1. to talk together, usu. intensely and intimately; interchange thoughts or feelings.
2. to be in intimate communication or rapport.
n.
3. interchange of ideas or sentiments.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Middle French comuner to share, derivative of comun common]
com•mun′er, n.

com•mune2

(kəˈmyun)

v.i. -muned, -mun•ing.
to partake of the Eucharist.
[1275–1325; Middle English; back formation from communion]

com•mune3

(ˈkɒm yun)

n.
1. a small group of persons living together, sharing possessions, work, income, etc., and often pursuing unconventional lifestyles.
2. a close-knit community of people who share common interests.
3. the smallest administrative division in France, Italy, Switzerland, etc., governed by a mayor and council.
4. a community organized for the promotion of local interests.
5. the government or citizens of a commune.
6. the Commune. Also called Com′mune of Par′is, Paris Commune.
a. a revolutionary committee that took control of the government of Paris from 1789 to 1794.
b. a socialist government that controlled Paris from March 18 to May 27, 1871.
[1785–95; < French < Medieval Latin commūna (feminine), alter. of Latin commūne community, state, orig. neuter of commūnis common]

Commune

 a body of the commons; a group forming an interim government. e.g., in Paris in 1794 and 1781; a group living together in a common community.

commune


Past participle: communed
Gerund: communing

Imperative
commune
commune
Present
I commune
you commune
he/she/it communes
we commune
you commune
they commune
Preterite
I communed
you communed
he/she/it communed
we communed
you communed
they communed
Present Continuous
I am communing
you are communing
he/she/it is communing
we are communing
you are communing
they are communing
Present Perfect
I have communed
you have communed
he/she/it has communed
we have communed
you have communed
they have communed
Past Continuous
I was communing
you were communing
he/she/it was communing
we were communing
you were communing
they were communing
Past Perfect
I had communed
you had communed
he/she/it had communed
we had communed
you had communed
they had communed
Future
I will commune
you will commune
he/she/it will commune
we will commune
you will commune
they will commune
Future Perfect
I will have communed
you will have communed
he/she/it will have communed
we will have communed
you will have communed
they will have communed
Future Continuous
I will be communing
you will be communing
he/she/it will be communing
we will be communing
you will be communing
they will be communing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been communing
you have been communing
he/she/it has been communing
we have been communing
you have been communing
they have been communing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been communing
you will have been communing
he/she/it will have been communing
we will have been communing
you will have been communing
they will have been communing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been communing
you had been communing
he/she/it had been communing
we had been communing
you had been communing
they had been communing
Conditional
I would commune
you would commune
he/she/it would commune
we would commune
you would commune
they would commune
Past Conditional
I would have communed
you would have communed
he/she/it would have communed
we would have communed
you would have communed
they would have communed

Commune

1871 A radical Paris government opposed to the peace terms for the end of the Franco-Prussian war and the right-wing composition of the newly elected National Assembly. It was suppressed with atrocities on both sides.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Commune - the smallest administrative district of several European countriescommune - the smallest administrative district of several European countries
administrative district, administrative division, territorial division - a district defined for administrative purposes
Italia, Italian Republic, Italy - a republic in southern Europe on the Italian Peninsula; was the core of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire between the 4th century BC and the 5th century AD
Belgique, Belgium, Kingdom of Belgium - a monarchy in northwestern Europe; headquarters for the European Union and for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
Schweiz, Suisse, Svizzera, Swiss Confederation, Switzerland - a landlocked federal republic in central Europe
2.commune - a body of people or families living together and sharing everything
assemblage, gathering - a group of persons together in one place
Verb1.commune - communicate intimately with; be in a state of heightened, intimate receptivity; "He seemed to commune with nature"
communicate, intercommunicate - transmit thoughts or feelings; "He communicated his anxieties to the psychiatrist"
pray - address a deity, a prophet, a saint or an object of worship; say a prayer; "pray to the Lord"
2.commune - receive Communion, in the Catholic church
communicate - administer Communion; in church
covenant - enter into a covenant or formal agreement; "They covenanted with Judas for 30 pieces of silver"; "The nations covenanted to fight terrorism around the world"

commune

noun community, collective, cooperative, kibbutz They briefly joined a hippie commune in Denmark.
Translations
الكوميونه العامَّه
komuna
kollektivstorfamilie
kommuna
kommúna, sambÿli
bendruomenėbendruomeniniskomuna
komūnakopiena
komúna
cemaatkomün

commune

[ˈkɒmjuːn]
A. N (= group) → comuna f
B. [kəˈmjuːn] VI
1. (Rel) (esp US) → comulgar
2. to commune withestar en contacto con
to commune with nature/one's soulestar en contacto con la naturaleza/su alma

commune

[ˈkɒmjuːn]
n
(= group of people) → communauté f
[kəˈmjuːn] vi
to commune with → converser intimement avec, communier avec

commune

1
vi
(= communicate)Zwiesprache halten; to commune with the spiritsmit den Geistern verkehren
(esp US Eccl, Catholic) → kommunizieren, die Kommunion empfangen; (Protestant)das Abendmahl empfangen

commune

2
nKommune f; (= administrative division also)Gemeinde f

commune

[n ˈkɒmjuːn; vb kəˈmjuːn]
1. n (group) → comune f
2. vi to commune with naturecomunicare con la natura

commune

(ˈkomjuːn) noun
a group of people living together and sharing everything they own.
ˈcommunal adjective
1. of a community. The communal life suited them.
2. shared. a communal television aerial.
References in classic literature ?
He sometimes saw Cassy; and sometimes, when summoned to the house, caught a glimpse of the dejected form of Emmeline, but held very little communion with either; in fact, there was no time for him to commune with anybody.
In this strain of consolation, Herbert informed me the invisible Barley would commune with himself by the day and night together; often while it was light, having, at the same time, one eye at a telescope which was fitted on his bed for the convenience of sweeping the river.
Now whenas sacred Light began to dawne In EDEN on the humid Flours, that breathd Thir morning Incense, when all things that breath, From th' Earths great Altar send up silent praise To the Creator, and his Nostrils fill With gratefull Smell, forth came the human pair And joynd thir vocal Worship to the Quire Of Creatures wanting voice, that done, partake The season, prime for sweetest Sents and Aires: Then commune how that day they best may ply Thir growing work: for much thir work outgrew The hands dispatch of two Gardning so wide.
Later, he learned that Erik had found, all prepared for him, a secret passage, long known to himself alone and contrived at the time of the Paris Commune to allow the jailers to convey their prisoners straight to the dungeons that had been constructed for them in the cellars; for the Federates had occupied the opera-house immediately after the eighteenth of March and had made a starting-place right at the top for their Mongolfier balloons, which carried their incendiary proclamations to the departments, and a state prison right at the bottom.
Italy and Germany had recently been built into nations; France had finally swept aside the Empire and the Commune and established the Republic.
The serf, in the period of serfdom, raised himself to membership in the commune, just as the petty bourgeois, under the yoke of feudal absolutism, managed to develop into a bourgeois.
A political spy, a stock-jobber, a contractor, a man who confiscated in collusion with the syndic of a commune the property of emigres in order to sell them and buy them in, a minister, and a general were all equally engaged in public business.
One of its chiefs, who understood Provencal, begged the commune of Marseilles to give them this bare and barren promontory, where, like the sailors of old, they had run their boats ashore.
The bears made an awkward bound or two, as if wounded, and then walked off with great gravity, seeming to commune together, and every now and then turning to take another look at the hunters.
There are, I believe, Miss Henley, spirits in the world who commune with each other imperceptibly, who seem formed for each other, and who know and love each other as by instinct.
It would have wearied a new congregation; but to-morrow I purpose administering the sacrament, Do you commune, my young friend?
It was enough for them that their Xavier--this son, this father, this husband--ascended periodically to commune with powers, it might be angelic, beyond their comprehension, and that they united daily in prayers for his safety.

Full browser ?