communitarianism

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communitarianism

a communal system based on cooperative groups that practice some of the principles of communism. — communitarian, n., adj.
See also: Communalism
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The protagonists of one of these debates are communitarians and liberals.
It commences with an exploration of the political philosophy of communitarianism and its perceived authoritarian deficiencies in implementation, a consideration of the alternative agenda proposed by radical egalitarian communitarians and their analysis of the socio-economic inadequacies of contemporary society.
The community was to be self-sufficient; safe from the corruption of what lay beyond its confines and all, or nearly all, that was necessary to satisfy the wants of the communitarians was to be furnished from within.
Yet, what sets the two groups apart, Rao remarks, is that they have identified different enemies: Communitarians and nationalists pointed to the international system as the main threat, while cosmopolitans point to the state, or, more specifically, to the often brutal 'Third World state'.
Within this larger group of 341, two important subgroups were uncovered and labeled: the Communitarians and the Individualists.
At its simplest, the chief criticism communitarians aim at the contemporary contours of our dominant culture is that it has allowed a kind of possessive individualism to create a focus on the self as the predominant contributing force in identity formation.
He is perhaps best known for his affiliation with the so-called communitarians during the 1990s.
Breslin (government, Skidmore College) understands that the concepts shared by most American communitarians are largely incompatible with the basic tenets of modern constitutionalism, and that the rules governing constitutionalism clearly state that the community's wishes must remain subordinate to the Constitution.
I attempt to move the debate in this direction by showing that the conclusions of Hayekian liberalism are more consistent with the nonreductionist foundations of green communitarianism than are the conclusions of the communitarians themselves.
The Communitarian Persuasion (1) defends communitarianism against its critics, (2) shows where communitarians can accept liberal insights, and (3) touches on some issues concerning which, traditionally, communitarians have said little, from cultural diversity, to rights, to social justice.
The most important distinction between individualists and communitarians, Lodge asserts, has to do with the role of the state in achieving a ruling "consensus.
The new communities are simply chosen rather than coerced, unlike the older ones that communitarians hark back to.

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