comorbidity


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co·mor·bid

 (kō-môr′bĭd)
adj.
Coexisting or concomitant with an unrelated pathological or disease process: patients with comorbid diabetes and depression.

co′mor·bid′i·ty n.

comorbidity

(ˌkəʊmɔːˈbɪdɪtɪ)
n
(Pathology) the occurrence of more than one illness or condition at the same time
Translations

comorbidity

n comorbilidad
References in periodicals archive ?
2003), and chronic physical comorbidity significantly decreased the odds that physicians and untreated patients discussed depression as a possible diagnosis (Rost et al.
Nurses need to be aware of the potential risks of the cognitive decline of their clients, especially if they have more than one comorbidity or are advancing in age when many comorbidities are more prevalent.
of Connecticut Health Center) reviews research on the etiology, comorbidity, and treatments of problem and pathological gambling from a psychological perspective, for clinicians, treatment providers, and researchers.
As for psychotropic medication use, those with high medical comorbidity were prescribed an average of 2.
Previous research has suggested that "hormonal therapy, when added to radiation therapy (RT) for treating unfavorable-risk prostate cancer, leads to an increase in survival except possibly in men with moderate to severe comorbidity [co-existing illnesses].
In addition to a set of facility, patient age, day-of-stay, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) use, and 15 (17 as of October, 2007 using the MS-DRGs) psychiatric DRG adjustors, the IPF-PPS includes 17 comorbidity categories (CCs) to adjust payments for specific high-cost patient populations.
The study analyzed data from the 2002 National Comorbidity Survey Replication, a nationally representative analysis of Americans ages 18 to 64.
In addition, active musculoskeletal or joint disease was found in 56 patients (32%), and a total of 131 (75%) had a history of this comorbidity.
Background Comorbidity may be associated with later detection of cancer.
Comorbidity of DSM-III-R personality disorders in schizophrenic and unipolar mood disorders: a comparative study.
The authors succinctly describe the epidemiology, pathogenesis (including cytokines and genetics), and risk factors of the comorbidity between depression and heart disease.
The time to colonoscopy after a positive fecal occult blood test varied widely between health systems, and varied based on age and comorbidity score, in a study of more than 62,000 patients from four health systems.