companionate marriage

companionate marriage

n.
A marriage based on the mutual consent and equality of the partners for the purpose of companionship rather than with the expectation of child-rearing or financial support.

compan′ionate mar′riage


n.
a proposed form of marriage permitting the divorce of a childless couple by mutual consent, leaving neither spouse responsible for the financial welfare of the other.
[1925]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ideas of companionate marriage and the cultivation of an affective self imply masculinities that are more sensitive and less domineering.
7) Though his advocacy for companionate marriage and his openness to unwed motherhood and trial marriage mark progressive formulations of family, Lindsey, a judge in Denver's juvenile courts, espoused some markedly conservative views as well.
Her conclusions seem banal: Milton and Johnson both believe in companionate marriage and they encourage curiosity within limits.
Bradford Wilcox's Soft Patriarchy, that marriages "centered around more intensive family ends" and religious faith are "at least as satisfying, and probably more satisfying than companionate marriage.
Ostensibly, companionate marriage offered an equalization of the genders as it "assumed that the wife was capable of the sympathy, understanding and intelligence necessary to maintain her side of the partnership" (Honig 64).
Both men and women also asked White allies and institutions for support when it was in their interest, and aligned themselves with mainstream gender and family ideals as the companionate marriage bargain emerged out of late Victorian America.
READING Spenser's Amoretti and Epithalamion according to theories of the, "Puritan art of love" and the "rise of companionate marriage,' critics have widely agreed that this pair of poems offers a firmly Protestant alternative to Petrarchan convention.
But the version of companionate marriage that Russell argues for in Marriage and Morals involves balance and restraint.
97) Cherlin notes that while there are still marriages that fit the companionate model, the survival of companionate marriage is more a reflection of the range of choices modern spouses have in developing their own roles within their marriage rather than merely stepping into roles dictated by society.
Although they did not use the term, several couples described marital relations that historians have described in other contexts as companionate marriage.
One of the most relevant normalizing processes in terms of the action of The Garden of Eden was the companionate marriage campaign of the 1920s and 30s.
Catherine seems destined for a companionate marriage, the marriage model desired by the female gothic heroine.