companionate marriage

companionate marriage

n.
A marriage based on the mutual consent and equality of the partners for the purpose of companionship rather than with the expectation of child-rearing or financial support.

compan′ionate mar′riage


n.
a proposed form of marriage permitting the divorce of a childless couple by mutual consent, leaving neither spouse responsible for the financial welfare of the other.
[1925]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Fielding's decision not to marry is very significant in a novel in which the notion of companionate marriage is celebrated through the union of Mr.
Levy-Navarro similarly analyzes the queer potential of Venus's large body, arguing that Venus "gives free reign [sic] to her appetites in a way that will be perceived as dangerous to those who value a companionate marriage that requires that the appetites be moderated and contained within an increasingly more affectively and erotically demanding bond between husband and wife .
Schaffer confronts the now-rote story of companionate marriage to question whether an emphasis on stranger-love formed romantic ideals for the early Victorians.
For nineteenth-century Janeites, literature was an object of domestic, habitual love, modeled on the felicitous companionate marriage that the reader may imagine to follow the denouement (or rather, nouement) of an Austen courtship plot.
Each marriage negotiation between two generations also "brings into direct competition two social and legal orders--one feudal and patriarchal in its assertion of kinship, the other mercantile and negotiative in pursuit of individual desires" (3), and the triumph of a manipulative and materially self-interested younger generation marks a cultural move toward individual choice and companionate marriage.
Other evidence, from romances like Leucippe and Clitophon, The Ephesian Tale, and The History of Apollonius, Prince of Tyre, to the widespread erotic representations in Roman homes (notably the ubiquitous ceramic lamps that frequently depicted symplegmata, or sexual positions of every sort) argues for the flourishing of something like companionate marriage.
In the United States, the evolution toward a nuclear family formed through a companionate marriage was hastened by the Depression and the Second World War.
Sense and Sensibility considers companionate marriage within a patronage system based on gift exchange.
Given its portrait of a faithful, companionate marriage that actually works, this should come as no surprise.
The women in my study spoke of marriage as a filial duty but also as a means to satisfy desires for love and companionship, and for personal growth, as befits a companionate marriage.
Ideas of companionate marriage and the cultivation of an affective self imply masculinities that are more sensitive and less domineering.
The doctrine of companionate marriage posed marriage as the ideal social arrangement for women, contending that as wives women would find their apotheosis as women.