comparable worth


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comparable worth

n.
The theory that compensation for jobs filled chiefly by women should be the same as those filled chiefly by men if the jobs, regardless of how different they may be, have equal socioeconomic value.

com′parable worth′


n.
the concept that a woman's and man's pay should be equal for comparable jobs.
[1980–85]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Jobs, Job Status, and Women's Gains from Affirmative Action: Implications for Comparable Worth.
And suppose that in addition to his policy positions he then dared to talk openly about the nation's hypocrisy on issues of sexuality, about the identification of the politically unacceptable with the morally illicit, about what a serious national family policy would entail (namely, federally funded child care, parental leave, comparable worth, national health insurance and so forth).
The issue of pay equity or comparable worth provides an example.
The discussion is complemented by brief summaries of international experiences with comparable worth implementation and speculation concerning which countries could implement comparable worth in the future.
By the end of World War II, the United Electrical Workers were even promoting what we now call comparable worth.
After suffering some reverses in the last year, backers of the comparable worth concept of pay equity were heartened by a settlement concluding the 5-year controversy between the State of Washington and several unions.
One such initiative to reduce the wage disparity has been the move to establish pay equity based on an analysis of the comparable worth of jobs: jobs are analyzed for compensable job content, and jobs found comparable in worth are expected to be paid comparably regardless of the gender of the job's typical incumbent.
In 1980, Winn Newman, chief counsel for the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), pushed the concept of comparable worth into the courtroom when he charged the state of Washington with setting discriminatory pay policies based on sex.
One of its major areas of focus is direct support of comparable worth and pay equity initiatives and activities designed to improve the salaries and sttus of librarians and other library workers.
Canada has been called a world leader in comparable worth, having the "most extensive pay-equity legislation in the world.
In addition, the author talks about comparable worth and ways to ameliorate income inequality in modern day life.
In March 1998, the legislature in West Virginia commissioned a comparable worth study.