comparatist


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com·par·a·tist

 (kəm-păr′ə-tĭst)
n.
A person who employs the comparative method, as in studying literature.

[French comparatiste, from comparative, comparative, from comparer, to compare; see compare.]

comparatist

(kəmˈpærəˌtɪst) or

comparativist

n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a person who carries out comparative studies, esp a student of comparative literature or comparative linguistics
References in periodicals archive ?
The novelists this justly acclaimed interpreter of literariness and criticism examines are usually marshaled in larger studies, and accordingly three of the six chapters scrutinize known authors of presumably different literary traditions for truly original findings that are an essential report to the comparatist academy.
We are a generalist and comparatist print quarterly, not restricted by national borders and chronological periods.
MacPhail's book demonstrates how crucial it is for scholars to move beyond their disciplinary silos to undertake comparatist and transnational research.
In the first essay of this compilation, Himani Banerjee commemorates imminent translation theorist and comparatist Barbara Godard (1941-2010), and presents a critical review of the emergence and transformation of Canadian literature as a site multicultural inquiry.
In examining two main subjects, the comparatist risks becoming overwhelmed with making biographical or historical connections, leaving less space for deeper analysis.
I, too, wish to throw out my own (more prosaic) frisbee on the possibilities of poetry, from the borders of poetry itself, that is, as a comparatist more at home in crossdisciplinary and intercultural approaches to fiction than in the specificities of the poetic genre itself, yet convinced that adding some more verses to our syllabi can open up attractive new trails to explore in the classroom and in research.
86) As a comparatist who believes strongly in the importance of respecting how cultures are 'mapped' (87) through the legal traditions that express them via a definition of identities, I would suggest that any attempt to transplant codification into the Common (and, thus, Australian) law context would be not only inappropriate, but also misleading and dangerous.
Following the comparatist Masaji Chiba, I want to suggest that the project is an heir to comparative law in the way that it clarifies, and produces, challenges.
Peter Nazareth describes him as "an example of the best produced by the Hindu intellectual tradition--the capacity to be a true comparatist without losing the judgment of a literary critic" (qtd.
The topics include conceptions of purity in Egyptian religion, aspects of purity in the Phoenician world, Greek and comparatist reflexions on food prohibitions, sacral purity and social order in ancient Rome, the relevance of purity in Second Temple Judaism according to Ezra-Nehemiah, purity concepts in Jewish traditions of the Hellenistic Period, and the evolution of purity at Qumran.
Gros's thoughts are always directed outward, in true comparatist fashion, to literatures and literary genres in the rest of the world, thereby giving early Tamil literature a place in world genres writ large.
Much to his advantage, Prete is both theorist and practitioner, both poet and translator, both Italianist and comparatist.