comparative


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comparative adjective

Comparative adjectives are adjectives that compare differences between the attributes of two nouns. These are often measurements, such as height, weight, depth, distance, etc., but they don’t have to be. We can also use comparative adjectives to compare non-physical characteristics.
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com·par·a·tive

 (kəm-păr′ə-tĭv)
adj.
1.
a. Relating to, based on, or involving comparison.
b. Of or relating to the scientific or historical comparison of different phenomena, institutions, or objects, such as languages, legal systems, or anatomical structures, in an effort to understand their origins or relationships.
2. Estimated by comparison; relative: a comparative newcomer.
3. Grammar Of, relating to, or being the intermediate degree of comparison of adjectives, as better, sweeter, or more wonderful, or adverbs, as more softly.
n. Grammar
1. The comparative degree.
2. An adjective or adverb expressing the comparative degree.

com·par′a·tive·ly adv.
Our Living Language Speakers of vernacular dialects often use double comparatives and superlatives such as more higher and most fastest. Although such constructions may seem redundant or even illogical, standard and nonstandard varieties of all languages are replete with such constructions. In English the redundant comparative dates back to the 1500s. Prior to this, in Old and Middle English, suffixes, rather than a preceding more or most, almost always marked the comparative and superlative forms of adjectives and adverbs, regardless of word length. In the Early Modern English period (c. 1500-1800), more and most constructions became more common. The Modern English rule governing the distribution of -er/-est and more/most had not yet arisen, and such forms as eminenter, impudentest, and beautifullest occurred together with constructions like more near, most poor, and most foul. Double markings were commonly used to indicate special emphasis, and they do not appear to have been socially disfavored. Even Shakespeare used double comparatives and superlatives, as in Mark Antony's statement "This was the most unkindest cut of all" from Julius Caesar. Nowadays, although double comparatives and superlatives are not considered standard usage, they are kept alive in vernacular dialects. See Note at might2, plural

comparative

(kəmˈpærətɪv)
adj
1. denoting or involving comparison: comparative literature.
2. judged by comparison; relative: a comparative loss of prestige.
3. (Grammar) grammar denoting the form of an adjective that indicates that the quality denoted is possessed to a greater extent. In English the comparative form of an adjective is usually marked by the suffix -er or the word more. Compare positive10, superlative2
n
(Grammar) the comparative form of an adjective
comˈparatively adv
comˈparativeness n

com•par•a•tive

(kəmˈpær ə tɪv)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to comparison.
2. proceeding by, founded on, or using comparison as a method of study: comparative anatomy.
3. estimated by comparison; not positive or absolute; relative: to live in comparative luxury.
4. of or designating the intermediate degree of comparison of adjectives and adverbs, used to show an increase in quality, quantity, or intensity, as in smaller, better, and more carefully, the comparative forms of small, good, and carefully. Compare positive (def. 22), superlative (def. 2).
n.
5. the comparative degree.
6. the comparative form of an adjective or adverb.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin]
com•par′a•tive•ly, adv.
com•par′a•tive•ness, n.
Positive, comparative, superlative, - Positive is the ordinary form of a word, with comparative conveying a sense of greater intensity of the adjective and superlative reflecting the greatest intensity of the adjective.
See also related terms for positive.

comparative

Used to describe an adjective or adverb comparing two things, for example, “brighter” or “more brightly.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.comparative - the comparative form of an adjective or adverb; "`faster' is the comparative of the adjective `fast'"; "`less famous' is the comparative degree of the adjective `famous'"; "`more surely' is the comparative of the adverb `surely'"
adjective - a word that expresses an attribute of something
adverb - a word that modifies something other than a noun
better - (comparative of `good') superior to another (of the same class or set or kind) in excellence or quality or desirability or suitability; more highly skilled than another; "You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din"; "a better coat"; "a better type of car"; "a suit with a better fit"; "a better chance of success"; "produced a better mousetrap"; "she's better in math than in history"
worse - (comparative of `bad') inferior to another in quality or condition or desirability; "this road is worse than the first one we took"; "the road is in worse shape than it was"; "she was accused of worse things than cheating and lying"
better - (comparative of `good') changed for the better in health or fitness; "her health is better now"; "I feel better"
more, more than - (comparative of `much' used with mass nouns) a quantifier meaning greater in size or amount or extent or degree; "more land"; "more support"; "more rain fell"; "more than a gallon"
less - (comparative of `little' usually used with mass nouns) a quantifier meaning not as great in amount or degree; "of less importance"; "less time to spend with the family"; "a shower uses less water"; "less than three years old"
more - (comparative of `many' used with count nouns) quantifier meaning greater in number; "a hall with more seats"; "we have no more bananas"; "more than one"
fewer - (comparative of `few' used with count nouns) quantifier meaning a smaller number of; "fewer birds came this year"; "the birds are fewer this year"; "fewer trains were late"
worse - (comparative of `ill') in a less effective or successful or desirable manner; "he did worse on the second exam"
closer, nearer, nigher - (comparative of `near' or `close') within a shorter distance; "come closer, my dear!"; "they drew nearer"; "getting nearer to the true explanation"
Adj.1.comparative - relating to or based on or involving comparison; "comparative linguistics"
2.comparative - estimated by comparison; not absolute or complete; "a relative stranger"

comparative

adjective relative, qualified, by comparison, approximate The task was accomplished with comparative ease.

comparative

adjective
Estimated by comparison:
Translations
دَرَجَة المُقارَنَهمُقارِن، مُشابِه
komparativpoměrnýstupňovací
forholdsviskomparativnogenlunderelativ
komparatiivisuhteellinenverrannollinenvertailevavertailumuoto
komparativ
középfokösszehasonlító
miðstigmiîstigsamanburîar-
比較級
komparatívkomparatívny
primerjalenprimernik
komparativ
göreceliüstünlük derecesi

comparative

[kəmˈpærətɪv]
A. ADJ
1. (= relative) → relativo
before becoming famous she had lived in comparative obscurityhabía vivido en relativa oscuridad antes de hacerse famosa
2. [study] → comparativo, comparado
3. (Gram) → comparativo
B. N (Gram) → comparativo m
C. CPD comparative literature Nliteratura f comparada

comparative

[kəmˈpærətɪv] adj
[study] → comparatif/ive
(= relative) [safety, peace] → relatif/ive
a comparative stranger
She is a comparative stranger → Je la connais relativement peu.

comparative

adj
religion, philology etcvergleichend; comparative literaturevergleichende Literaturwissenschaft, Komparatistik f
the comparative form (Gram) → der Komparativ, die erste Steigerungsstufe
(= relative)relativ; to live in comparative luxuryrelativ luxuriös leben
n (Gram) → Komparativ m

comparative

[kəmˈpærətɪv]
1. adj (freedom, luxury, cost) → relativo/a; (adjective, adverb) → comparativo/a; (study, literature) → comparato/a
she's a comparative stranger → la conosco relativamente poco
2. n (Gram) → comparativo

compare

(kəmˈpeə) verb
1. to put (things etc) side by side in order to see to what extent they are the same or different. If you compare his work with hers you will find hers more accurate; This is a good essay compared with your last one.
2. to describe as being similar to. She compared him to a monkey.
3. to be near in standard or quality. He just can't compare with Mozart.
comparable (ˈkompərəbl) adjective
of the same kind, on the same scale etc. The houses were not at all comparable in size.
comparative (kəmˈpӕrətiv) adjective
1. judged by comparing with something else. the comparative quiet of the suburbs.
2. (of an adjective or adverb used in comparisons) between positive and superlative, as the following underlined words. a bigger book; a better man; Blacker is a comparative adjective; (also noun) What is the comparative of `bad'?
comˈparatively adverb
This house was comparatively cheap.
comparison (kəmˈpӕrisn) noun
(an act of) comparing. There's no comparison between Beethoven and pop music; Living here is cheap in comparison with London.

compare with is used to bring out similarities and differences between two things of the same type: He compared his pen with mine and decided mine was better .
compare to is used when pointing out a similarity between two different things: Stars are often compared to diamonds .

comparative

a. comparativo-a.
References in classic literature ?
As Tom and Ned had no wish for a light, which would be sure to attract insects, they entered their tent in the dark, and were soon stretched out in comparative comfort.
In another minute the whole party was collected in this spot of comparative safety.
I meant to be such a help to John, such a real rest and comfort, and here I am a comparative burden already!
At this arched window, throwing it open, but keeping himself in comparative obscurity by means of the curtain, Clifford had an opportunity of witnessing such a portion of the great world's movement as might be supposed to roll through one of the retired streets of a not very populous city.
The jailer, after ushering him into the room, remained a moment, marvelling at the comparative quiet that followed his entrance; for Hester Prynne had immediately become as still as death, although the child continued to moan.
I quickened our step; I wanted to get there before the question between us opened up much further; I reflected hungrily that, for more than an hour, he would have to be silent; and I thought with envy of the comparative dusk of the pew and of the almost spiritual help of the hassock on which I might bend my knees.
Much the same is it with the backwoodsman of the West, who with comparative indifference views an unbounded prairie sheeted with driven snow, no shadow of tree or twig to break the fixed trance of whiteness.
But if from the comparative dimensions of the whale's proper brain, you deem it incapable of being adequately charted, then I have another idea for you.
And let it be remembered that these individuals have thus bravely succeeded in conquering for themselves comparative wealth and social position, in the face of every disadvantage and discouragement.
Our legislators have not yet learned the comparative value of free trade and of freed, of union, and of rectitude, to a nation.
At present, in this vicinity, the best part of the land is not private property; the landscape is not owned, and the walker enjoys comparative freedom.
There would be no question of walking for many a month to come, but blessings seemed to multiply when the blinds could be opened and the bed drawn near the window; when mother, with pillows behind her, could at least sit and watch the work going on, could smile at the past agony and forget the weary hours that had led to her present comparative ease and comfort.

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