comparatively


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com·par·a·tive

 (kəm-păr′ə-tĭv)
adj.
1.
a. Relating to, based on, or involving comparison.
b. Of or relating to the scientific or historical comparison of different phenomena, institutions, or objects, such as languages, legal systems, or anatomical structures, in an effort to understand their origins or relationships.
2. Estimated by comparison; relative: a comparative newcomer.
3. Grammar Of, relating to, or being the intermediate degree of comparison of adjectives, as better, sweeter, or more wonderful, or adverbs, as more softly.
n. Grammar
1. The comparative degree.
2. An adjective or adverb expressing the comparative degree.

com·par′a·tive·ly adv.
Our Living Language Speakers of vernacular dialects often use double comparatives and superlatives such as more higher and most fastest. Although such constructions may seem redundant or even illogical, standard and nonstandard varieties of all languages are replete with such constructions. In English the redundant comparative dates back to the 1500s. Prior to this, in Old and Middle English, suffixes, rather than a preceding more or most, almost always marked the comparative and superlative forms of adjectives and adverbs, regardless of word length. In the Early Modern English period (c. 1500-1800), more and most constructions became more common. The Modern English rule governing the distribution of -er/-est and more/most had not yet arisen, and such forms as eminenter, impudentest, and beautifullest occurred together with constructions like more near, most poor, and most foul. Double markings were commonly used to indicate special emphasis, and they do not appear to have been socially disfavored. Even Shakespeare used double comparatives and superlatives, as in Mark Antony's statement "This was the most unkindest cut of all" from Julius Caesar. Nowadays, although double comparatives and superlatives are not considered standard usage, they are kept alive in vernacular dialects. See Note at might2, plural
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.comparatively - in a relative manner; by comparison to something else; "the situation is relatively calm now"
Translations
بالمُقارَنَهنِسْبِياً
poměrně
forholdsvisforholdsvistnogenlunde
verraten
razmjerno
hlutfallslega, tiltölulega
比較的
비교적
jämförelsevis
ที่เปรียบเทียบได้
tương đối

comparatively

[kəmˈpærətɪvlɪ] ADV (= relatively) → relativamente; [consider, view] → desde un punto de vista relativo
the books can be studied comparativelyse puede hacer un estudio comparado de los libros

comparatively

[kəmˈpærətɪvli] adv (= relatively) → relativement

comparatively

adv
(= relatively)verhältnismäßig, relativ

comparatively

[kəmˈpærətɪvlɪ] adv (see adj) → relativamente, comparativamente

compare

(kəmˈpeə) verb
1. to put (things etc) side by side in order to see to what extent they are the same or different. If you compare his work with hers you will find hers more accurate; This is a good essay compared with your last one.
2. to describe as being similar to. She compared him to a monkey.
3. to be near in standard or quality. He just can't compare with Mozart.
comparable (ˈkompərəbl) adjective
of the same kind, on the same scale etc. The houses were not at all comparable in size.
comparative (kəmˈpӕrətiv) adjective
1. judged by comparing with something else. the comparative quiet of the suburbs.
2. (of an adjective or adverb used in comparisons) between positive and superlative, as the following underlined words. a bigger book; a better man; Blacker is a comparative adjective; (also noun) What is the comparative of `bad'?
comˈparatively adverb
This house was comparatively cheap.
comparison (kəmˈpӕrisn) noun
(an act of) comparing. There's no comparison between Beethoven and pop music; Living here is cheap in comparison with London.

compare with is used to bring out similarities and differences between two things of the same type: He compared his pen with mine and decided mine was better .
compare to is used when pointing out a similarity between two different things: Stars are often compared to diamonds .

comparatively

نِسْبِياً poměrně forholdsvis verhältnismäßig συγκριτικά comparativamente, relativamente verraten comparativement razmjerno relativamente 比較的 비교적 naar verhouding forholdsvis w porównaniu comparativamente сравнительно jämförelsevis ที่เปรียบเทียบได้ göreceli olarak tương đối 比较地
References in classic literature ?
The blood-sucking bats were comparatively few, and the migratory sort fewer still.
He met Robert one day talking to the girl, or walking with her, or bathing with her, or carrying her basket--I don't remember what;--and he became so insulting and abusive that Robert gave him a thrashing on the spot that has kept him comparatively in order for a good while.
A man at the very lowest point of the social scale was easier and more agreeable for the fallen gentleman to encounter than a person at any of the intermediate degrees; and, moreover, as Clifford's young manhood had been lost, he was fond of feeling himself comparatively youthful, now, in apposition with the patriarchal age of Uncle Venner.
There is one likeness, without which my gallery of Custom-House portraits would be strangely incomplete, but which my comparatively few opportunities for observation enable me to sketch only in the merest outline.
Agitation, in the interval, certainly had held me and driven me, for I must, in circling about the place, have walked three miles; but I was to be, later on, so much more overwhelmed that this mere dawn of alarm was a comparatively human chill.
It seemed hardly possible that by such comparatively small mouthfuls he could keep up the vitality diffused through so broad, baronial, and superb a person.
Full in this rapid wake, and many fathoms in the rear, swam a huge, humped old bull, which by his comparatively slow progress, as well as by the unusual yellowish incrustations overgrowing him, seemed afflicted with the jaundice, or some other infirmity.
A missionary figure among the fugitives in Canada told us that many of the fugitives confessed themselves to have escaped from comparatively kind masters, and that they were induced to brave the perils of escape, in almost every case, by the desperate horror with which they regarded being sold south,--a doom which was hanging either over themselves or their husbands, their wives or children.
Witness the present Mexican war, the work of comparatively a few individuals using the standing government as their tool; for in the outset, the people would not have consented to this measure.
I do not travel in them much, comparatively, because I am not in a hurry to get to any tavern or grocery or livery-stable or depot to which they lead.
There was a hole there which would afford steady work for all the people in that region for some years to come -- in trying to ex- plain it, I mean; as for filling it up, that service would be comparatively prompt, and would fall to the lot of a select few -- peasants of that seignory; and they wouldn't get anything for it, either.
Ca- pable of high attainments as an intellectual and moral being--needing nothing but a comparatively small amount of cultivation to make him an orna- ment to society and a blessing to his race--by the law of the land, by the voice of the people, by the terms of the slave code, he was only a piece of property, a beast of burden, a chattel personal, nevertheless!