compass


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compass
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compass
top: directional compass
bottom: bow compass

com·pass

 (kŭm′pəs, kŏm′-)
n.
1.
a. A device used to determine geographic direction, usually consisting of a magnetic needle or needles horizontally mounted or suspended and free to pivot until aligned with the earth's magnetic field.
b. Another device, such as a radio compass or a gyrocompass, used for determining geographic direction.
2. A V-shaped device for describing circles or circular arcs and for taking measurements, consisting of a pair of rigid, end-hinged legs, one of which is equipped with a pen, pencil, or other marker and the other with a sharp point providing a pivot about which the drawing leg is turned. Also called pair of compasses.
3. Awareness or understanding of one's purpose or objectives: "Lacking a coherent intellectual and moral commitment, [he] was forced to find his compass in personal experience" (Doris Kearns Goodwin).
4.
a. An enclosing line or boundary; a circumference: outside the compass of the fence. See Synonyms at circumference.
b. A restricted space or area: four huge crates within the compass of the elevator.
c. Range or scope, as of understanding, perception, or authority: The subject falls outside the compass of this study. See Synonyms at range.
5. Music See range.
tr.v. com·passed, com·pass·ing, com·pass·es
1. To make a circuit of; circle: The sailboat compassed the island.
2. To surround; encircle: The trees compass the grave.
3. To understand; comprehend: "God ... is too great a profundity to be compassed by human cerebration" (Flann O'Brian).
4.
a. To accomplish or bring about: "He compassed his end only by the exercise of gentle violence" (Henry James).
b. To gain or achieve: "She had compassed the high felicity of seeing the two men beautifully take to each another" (Henry James).
5. To scheme; plot: compass the death of the king.
adj.
Forming a curve.

[Middle English compas, circle, compass, from Old French, from compasser, to measure, from Vulgar Latin *compassāre, to pace off : Latin com-, com- + Latin passus, step; see pace1.]

com′pass·a·ble adj.

compass

(ˈkʌmpəs)
n
1. an instrument for finding direction, usually having a magnetized needle which points to magnetic north swinging freely on a pivot
2. (Mathematics) (often plural) Also called: pair of compasses an instrument used for drawing circles, measuring distances, etc, that consists of two arms, joined at one end, one arm of which serves as a pivot or stationary reference point, while the other is extended or describes a circle
3. limits or range: within the compass of education.
4. (Music, other) music the interval between the lowest and highest note attainable by a voice or musical instrument
5. archaic a circular course
vb (tr)
6. to encircle or surround; hem in
7. to comprehend or grasp mentally
8. to achieve; attain; accomplish
9. obsolete to plot
[C13: from Old French compas, from compasser to measure, from Vulgar Latin compassāre (unattested) to pace out, ultimately from Latin passus step]
ˈcompassable adj

com•pass

(ˈkʌm pəs)

n.
1. an instrument for determining directions, as by means of a freely rotating magnetized needle that indicates magnetic north.
2. Often, compasses. an instrument for drawing or describing circles, measuring distances, etc., consisting generally of two hinged, movable legs (often used with pair of).
3. the enclosing line or limits of any area; perimeter.
4. space within limits; scope: the broad compass of the novel.
5. the total range of tones of a voice or of a musical instrument.
6. due or proper limits; moderate bounds: to act within the compass of propriety.
7. a passing round; circuit: the compass of a year.
adj.
8. curved; forming a curve or arc: a compass roof.
v.t.
9. to go or move around; make the circuit of: to compass the city on foot.
10. to extend or stretch around; surround; encircle: A stone wall compasses the property.
11. to attain or achieve; accomplish; obtain.
12. to contrive; plot; scheme.
13. to make curved or circular.
14. to comprehend; grasp, as with the mind.
[1250–1300; (v.) Middle English < Old French compasser to measure < Vulgar Latin *compāssāre, v. derivative of *compāssus equal step (Latin com- com- + pāssus pace1); (n.) Middle English < Old French, derivative of compasser]
com′pass•a•ble, adj.

com·pass

(kŭm′pəs)
1. A device used to determine geographical direction, usually consisting of a magnetic needle mounted so that it points to magnetic north.
2. A device used for drawing circles and arcs and for measuring distances, consisting of two legs hinged together at one end.

compass


Past participle: compassed
Gerund: compassing

Imperative
compass
compass
Present
I compass
you compass
he/she/it compasses
we compass
you compass
they compass
Preterite
I compassed
you compassed
he/she/it compassed
we compassed
you compassed
they compassed
Present Continuous
I am compassing
you are compassing
he/she/it is compassing
we are compassing
you are compassing
they are compassing
Present Perfect
I have compassed
you have compassed
he/she/it has compassed
we have compassed
you have compassed
they have compassed
Past Continuous
I was compassing
you were compassing
he/she/it was compassing
we were compassing
you were compassing
they were compassing
Past Perfect
I had compassed
you had compassed
he/she/it had compassed
we had compassed
you had compassed
they had compassed
Future
I will compass
you will compass
he/she/it will compass
we will compass
you will compass
they will compass
Future Perfect
I will have compassed
you will have compassed
he/she/it will have compassed
we will have compassed
you will have compassed
they will have compassed
Future Continuous
I will be compassing
you will be compassing
he/she/it will be compassing
we will be compassing
you will be compassing
they will be compassing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been compassing
you have been compassing
he/she/it has been compassing
we have been compassing
you have been compassing
they have been compassing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been compassing
you will have been compassing
he/she/it will have been compassing
we will have been compassing
you will have been compassing
they will have been compassing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been compassing
you had been compassing
he/she/it had been compassing
we had been compassing
you had been compassing
they had been compassing
Conditional
I would compass
you would compass
he/she/it would compass
we would compass
you would compass
they would compass
Past Conditional
I would have compassed
you would have compassed
he/she/it would have compassed
we would have compassed
you would have compassed
they would have compassed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.compass - navigational instrument for finding directionscompass - navigational instrument for finding directions
gyrocompass - a compass that does not depend on magnetism but uses a gyroscope instead
magnetic compass - compass based on an indicator (as a magnetic needle) that points to the magnetic north
navigational instrument - an instrument used for navigating
2.compass - an area in which something acts or operates or has power or control: "the range of a supersonic jet"compass - an area in which something acts or operates or has power or control: "the range of a supersonic jet"; "a piano has a greater range than the human voice"; "the ambit of municipal legislation"; "within the compass of this article"; "within the scope of an investigation"; "outside the reach of the law"; "in the political orbit of a world power"
extent - the distance or area or volume over which something extends; "the vast extent of the desert"; "an orchard of considerable extent"
approximate range, ballpark - near to the scope or range of something; "his answer wasn't even in the right ballpark"
confines - a bounded scope; "he stayed within the confines of the city"
contrast - the range of optical density and tone on a photographic negative or print (or the extent to which adjacent areas on a television screen differ in brightness)
internationality, internationalism - quality of being international in scope; "he applauded the internationality of scientific terminology"
latitude - scope for freedom of e.g. action or thought; freedom from restriction
purview, horizon, view - the range of interest or activity that can be anticipated; "It is beyond the horizon of present knowledge"
expanse, sweep - a wide scope; "the sweep of the plains"
gamut - a complete extent or range: "a face that expressed a gamut of emotions"
spectrum - a broad range of related objects or values or qualities or ideas or activities
palette, pallet - the range of colour characteristic of a particular artist or painting or school of art
3.compass - the limit of capability; "within the compass of education"
capableness, potentiality, capability - an aptitude that may be developed
ken, sight - the range of vision; "out of sight of land"
4.compass - drafting instrument used for drawing circles
drafting instrument - an instrument used by a draftsman in making drawings
Verb1.compass - bring about; accomplish; "This writer attempts more than his talents can compass"
archaicism, archaism - the use of an archaic expression
achieve, attain, accomplish, reach - to gain with effort; "she achieved her goal despite setbacks"
2.compass - travel around, either by plane or ship; "We compassed the earth"
circle - travel around something; "circle the globe"
3.compass - get the meaning of somethingcompass - get the meaning of something; "Do you comprehend the meaning of this letter?"
understand - know and comprehend the nature or meaning of; "She did not understand her husband"; "I understand what she means"
figure - understand; "He didn't figure her"
catch on, cotton on, get it, get onto, get wise, twig, latch on, tumble - understand, usually after some initial difficulty; "She didn't know what her classmates were plotting but finally caught on"
intuit - know or grasp by intuition or feeling
digest - arrange and integrate in the mind; "I cannot digest all this information"

compass

1
noun
1. range, field, area, reach, scope, sphere, limit, stretch, bound, extent, zone, boundary, realm Within the compass of a book of this size, such a comprehensive survey is not practicable.

compass

2

Compass points

Compass Point 
Abbreviation
NorthN
North by EastN by E
North North EastNNE
North East by NorthNE by N
North EastNE
North East by EastNE by E
East North EastENE
East by NorthE by N
EastE
East by SouthE by S
East South EastESE
South East by EastSE by E
South EastSE
South East by SouthSE by S
South South EastSSE
South by EastS by E
SouthS
South by WestS by W
South South WestSSW
South West by SouthSW by S
South WestSW
South West by WestSW by W
West South WestWSW
West by SouthW by S
WestW
West by NorthW by N
West North WestWNW
North West by WestNW by W
North WestNW
North West by NorthNW by N
North North WestNNW
North by WestN by W
Cardinal point 
Related adjective
northarctic or boreal
eastoriental
southmeridional or austral
westoccidental or hesperidan

compass

noun
1. A line around a closed figure or area:
2. The ability or power to seize or attain:
3. An area within which something or someone exists, acts, or has influence or power:
verb
1. To encircle with or as if with a band:
Archaic: engird.
2. To shut in on all sides:
3. To perceive and recognize the meaning of:
Informal: savvy.
Slang: dig.
Chiefly British: twig.
Scots: ken.
4. To perceive directly with the intellect:
Scots: ken.
Translations
بُوصُلَةبوصَلَه، إبْرَةُ الملاّحينفِرْجار، بِركارمَدى، نِطاق
компас
kompaskružítkookruhbuzoladosah
kompasområdepasserrækkevidderamme
kompaso
kompass
kompassiäänialaalaalue
busolakompas
iránytûiránytűkörzõ
kompas
áttavitisirkillsviî, takmörk
コンパス
나침반
kompasaskompaso rožėribosskriestuvas
apjomscirkulisdiapazonskompass
busolă
kompaskružidlo
kompasšestilo
kompass
เข็มทิศ
la bàn

compass

[ˈkʌmpəs]
A. N
1. (Naut etc) → brújula f
2. (Math) (usu pl) → compás m
a pair of compassesun compás
3. (frm) (= range) → alcance m; (= area) → ámbito m
beyond my compassfuera de mi alcance
within the compass of the plandentro de lo abarcado por el plan
B. VT (frm) (= cover, take in) → abarcar (liter) (= surround) → rodear
C. CPD compass card N (Naut) → rosa f de los vientos
compass course Nruta f magnética
compass rose N = compass card

compass

[ˈkʌmpəs] n
(= instrument for finding directions) → boussole f
the points of the compass → les points cardinaux
(= extent, range) within the compass of → dans les limites de
beyond the compass of → hors de portée de, au-delà des limites de
(MATHEMATICS) = compasses

compass

n
Kompass m; by the compassnach dem Kompass
compasses pl (also pair of compasses)Zirkel m
(fig: = extent) → Rahmen m; (of human mind, experience)Bereich m; (Mus, of voice) → Umfang m
vt = encompass compassed about with enemies (form)von Feinden umzingelt

compass

:
compass bearing
nKompasspeilung f
compass card
nKompassscheibe f, → Windrose f
compass course
nNavigationskurs m

compass

[ˈkʌmpəs] n
a. (Naut) → bussola
b. (Math) (a pair of) compassesun compasso
c. (fig) (range) → portata
within the compass of → entro i limiti di

compass

(ˈkampəs)
noun.
1. an instrument with a magnetized needle, used to find directions. If he had carried a compass he would not have lost his way on the hills.
2. (in plural) an instrument with two movable legs, for drawing circles etc.
3. scope or range.
compass rose
the circular drawing showing directions on a plan or map.

compass

بُوصُلَة kompas kompas Kompass πυξίδα brújula kompassi boussole busola bussola コンパス 나침반 kompas kompass kompas bússola компас kompass เข็มทิศ pusula la bàn 罗盘
References in classic literature ?
They had not gone more than an hour on the second stage of their tramp when Tom, who was in the lead, following the direction laid out by the compass, suddenly stopped, and reached around for his electric rifle, which he was carrying at his back.
He was paid off one morning, and by the next he hadn't a cent left, and his watch and compass were gone.
She habitually ate chocolates for their sustaining quality; they contained much nutriment in small compass, she said.
Perhaps you understand the compass, and lay down the watercourses and mountains of the wilderness on paper, in order that they who follow may find places by their given names?
HALFWAY down a by-street of one of our New England towns stands a rusty wooden house, with seven acutely peaked gables, facing towards various points of the compass, and a huge, clustered chimney in the midst.
Doth the universe lie within the compass of yonder town, which only a little time ago was but a leaf-strewn desert, as lonely as this around us?
As soon as I could compass a private word with Mrs.
But, spite of all this, I could see no compass before me to steer by; though it seemed but a minute since I had been watching the card, by the steady binnacle lamp illuminating it.
Her father, whose only child she had been, had never denied her anything that lay within the compass of human possibility; and when she entered life, beautiful, accomplished, and an heiress, she had, of course, all the eligibles and non-eligibles of the other sex sighing at her feet, and she had no doubt that Augustine was a most fortunate man in having obtained her.
Oh, prithee delay not; to delay at such a time were to double and treble the perils that already compass thee about.
He studied a while, then he just went into the Details-- walked round and round the hole and spied into it from every point of the compass.
Did you ever try to have a sociable improving-time discussing winds, and currents and variations of compass with an undertaker?