compassion


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com·pas·sion

 (kəm-păsh′ən)
n.
Deep awareness of the suffering of another accompanied by the wish to relieve it. See Synonyms at pity.

[Middle English compassioun, from Late Latin compassiō, compassiōn-, from compassus, past participle of compatī, to sympathize : Latin com-, com- + Latin patī, to suffer; see pē(i)- in Indo-European roots.]

com·pas′sion·less adj.

compassion

(kəmˈpæʃən)
n
a feeling of distress and pity for the suffering or misfortune of another, often including the desire to alleviate it
[C14: from Old French, from Late Latin compassiō fellow feeling, from compatī to suffer with, from Latin com- with + patī to bear, suffer]

com•pas•sion

(kəmˈpæʃ ən)

n.
a feeling of deep sympathy and sorrow for someone struck by misfortune, accompanied by a desire to alleviate the suffering; mercy.
[1300–50; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Late Latin compassiō < compat(ī) (see compatible)]
syn: See sympathy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.compassion - a deep awareness of and sympathy for another's sufferingcompassion - a deep awareness of and sympathy for another's suffering
heartstrings - your deepest feelings of love and compassion; "many adoption cases tug at the heartstrings"
fellow feeling, sympathy - sharing the feelings of others (especially feelings of sorrow or anguish)
tenderheartedness, tenderness - warm compassionate feelings
mercifulness, mercy - the feeling that motivates compassion
2.compassion - the humane quality of understanding the suffering of others and wanting to do something about it
mercifulness, mercy - a disposition to be kind and forgiving; "in those days a wife had to depend on the mercifulness of her husband"

compassion

compassion

noun
Sympathetic, sad concern for someone in misfortune:
Translations
شَفَقَه، حُنُو
soucitsoustrastslitování
medfølelsemedlidenhed
אמפתיהחמלה
samúî
gailestis
līdzjūtība
deernismedelijden

compassion

[kəmˈpæʃən] Ncompasión f
to have compassion for sth/for or on sbtener compasión por or de algo/algn, compadecerse de algo/algn
to feel compassion for sbsentir compasión por or de algn
to move sb to compassionmover a algn a la compasión

compassion

[kəmˈpæʃən] ncompassion f, sensibilité f

compassion

nMitgefühl nt, → Mitleid nt(for mit); (esp Bibl) → Erbarmen nt(on, for mit)

compassion

[kəmˈpæʃn] ncompassione f

compassion

(kəmˈpӕʃən) noun
sorrow or pity for the sufferings of another person.
comˈpassionate (-nət) adjective

compassion

n. compasión, lástima.

compassion

n compasión f
References in classic literature ?
His first wooing had been of the tempestuous order, and he looked back upon ;it as if through a long vista of years with a feeling of compassion blended with regret.
He looked at me with a sort of condescending concern and compassion, as though he thought it a great pity that such a sensible young man should be so hopelessly lost to evangelical pagan piety.
The man who had addressed Haley, and who seemed not destitute of compassion, bought her for a trifle, and the spectators began to disperse.
I knew his story well, and so I knew how to interpret the compassion that was in his face when he bade me farewell.
Out of compassion, then, a decent spear was offered him, but he declined, and said, "spears were useless to men of science.
Matrimony, as the origin of change, was always disagreeable; and he was by no means yet reconciled to his own daughter's marrying, nor could ever speak of her but with compassion, though it had been entirely a match of affection, when he was now obliged to part with Miss Taylor too; and from his habits of gentle selfishness, and of being never able to suppose that other people could feel differently from himself, he was very much disposed to think Miss Taylor had done as sad a thing for herself as for them, and would have been a great deal happier if she had spent all the rest of her life at Hartfield.
Sir John had dropped hints of past injuries and disappointments, which justified her belief of his being an unfortunate man, and she regarded him with respect and compassion.
Brocklehurst, who, from his wealth and family connections, could not be overlooked, still retained the post of treasurer; but he was aided in the discharge of his duties by gentlemen of rather more enlarged and sympathising minds: his office of inspector, too, was shared by those who knew how to combine reason with strictness, comfort with economy, compassion with uprightness.
There was such anguish in the gush of grief that accompanied this raving, that my compassion made me overlook its folly, and I drew off, half angry to have listened at all, and vexed at having related my ridiculous nightmare, since it produced that agony; though WHY was beyond my comprehension.
And could I look upon her without compassion, seeing her punishment in the ruin she was, in her profound unfitness for this earth on which she was placed, in the vanity of sorrow which had become a master mania, like the vanity of penitence, the vanity of remorse, the vanity of unworthiness, and other monstrous vanities that have been curses in this world?
she said, with compassion in her tone, for she had immediately reflected that the dishonour must be felt still more keenly by her husband.
My wife, who was present, scoffed at my compassion, which made her malice of no avail.