compassionate


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

com·pas·sion·ate

 (kəm-păsh′ə-nĭt)
adj.
1. Feeling or showing compassion; sympathetic.
2. Granted to an individual because of an emergency or other unusual circumstances: compassionate military leave.
tr.v. (-nāt′) com·pas·sion·at·ed, com·pas·sion·at·ing, com·pas·sion·ates
To pity.

com·pas′sion·ate·ly adv.
com·pas′sion·ate·ness n.

compassionate

(kəmˈpæʃənət)
adj
1. showing or having compassion
2. compassionate leave leave granted, esp to a serviceman, on the grounds of bereavement, family illness, etc
comˈpassionately adv
comˈpassionateness n

com•pas•sion•ate

(adj. kəmˈpæʃ ə nɪt; v. -ˌneɪt)

adj., v. -at•ed, -at•ing. adj.
1. having or showing compassion; sympathetic: a compassionate letter.
2. granted in an emergency: compassionate military leave to attend a funeral.
v.t.
3. to have compassion for; pity.
[1580–90]
com•pas′sion•ate•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.compassionate - share the suffering of
grieve, sorrow - feel grief
commiserate, sympathise, sympathize - to feel or express sympathy or compassion
care - feel concern or interest; "I really care about my work"; "I don't care"
Adj.1.compassionate - showing or having compassion; "heard the soft and compassionate voices of women"
humane - marked or motivated by concern with the alleviation of suffering
merciful - showing or giving mercy; "sought merciful treatment for the captives"; "a merciful god"
sympathetic - expressing or feeling or resulting from sympathy or compassion or friendly fellow feelings; disposed toward; "sympathetic to the students' cause"; "a sympathetic observer"; "a sympathetic gesture"
uncompassionate - lacking compassion or feeling for others; "nor silver-shedding tears could penetrate her uncompassionate sire"- Shakespeare

compassionate

compassionate

adjective
1. Feeling or expressing pity:
Archaic: piteous, pitiful.
2. Concerned with human welfare and the alleviation of suffering:
verb
To experience or express compassion:
Idioms: be sorry, have pity.
Translations
شَفيق، مُشْفِق
soucitný
medfølende
samúîarfullur
merhametlişefkatli

compassionate

[kəmˈpæʃənɪt]
A. ADJ [person] → compasivo
on compassionate groundspor compasión
B. CPD compassionate leave Npermiso m por motivos familiares

compassionate

[kəmˈpæʃənət] adj
(= sympathetic, understanding) [person] → compatissant(e)
on compassionate grounds → pour raisons personnelles, pour raisons de famillecompassionate leave ncongé m exceptionnel (pour raisons de famille)

compassionate

adjmitfühlend, voller Mitgefühl or Mitleid; on compassionate groundsaus familiären Gründen

compassionate

[kəmˈpæʃənɪt] adj (person) → compassionevole
on compassionate grounds → per motivi personali

compassion

(kəmˈpӕʃən) noun
sorrow or pity for the sufferings of another person.
comˈpassionate (-nət) adjective

compassionate

adj compasivo; — use (pharm) uso compasivo
References in classic literature ?
The eyes of the listeners involuntarily sought the forms of the Indians, with a compassionate interest in their desolate fortune.
Hester saw and recognized the selfsame faces of that group of matrons, who had awaited her forthcoming from the prison-door seven years ago; all save one, the youngest and only compassionate among them, whose burial-robe she had since made.
The rough man held the candle to her face, and uttering a kind of compassionate grunt, opened the door of a small bed-room adjoining to the large kitchen where they were standing, and motioned her to go in.
Here she took out her handkerchief; but Elinor did not feel very compassionate.
Yes," responded Abbot; "if she were a nice, pretty child, one might compassionate her forlornness; but one really cannot care for such a little toad as that.
I began to dislike, more than to compassionate Linton, and to excuse his father in some measure for holding him cheap.
She was well known to the doctor as a trustworthy and careful person, who had nursed his own wife; and she would be assisted, from time to time, by a lady who was a member of a religious Sisterhood in the district, and whose compassionate interest had been warmly aroused in the case.
They served me with the ale, though I suspect it was not the Genuine Stunning; and the landlord's wife, opening the little half-door of the bar, and bending down, gave me my money back, and gave me a kiss that was half admiring and half compassionate, but all womanly and good, I am sure.
Joe and I going to church, therefore, must have been a moving spectacle for compassionate minds.
The patriarch sent me to expostulate the matter with the King, which I did in very warm terms, telling him that we were assured by the Emperor of a reception in this country far different from what we met with, which assurances he had confirmed by his promise and the civilities we were entertained with at our first arrival; but that instead of friends who would compassionate our miseries, and supply our necessities, we found ourselves in the midst of mortal enemies that wanted to destroy us.
One will pass all the hours of the night seated at the foot of some oak or rock, and there, without having closed his weeping eyes, the sun finds him in the morning bemused and bereft of sense; and another without relief or respite to his sighs, stretched on the burning sand in the full heat of the sultry summer noontide, makes his appeal to the compassionate heavens, and over one and the other, over these and all, the beautiful Marcela triumphs free and careless.
Her strong black brows spoke of temper easily aroused and hard to quiet; her mouth was small, nervous and weak; there was something dangerous and sulky underlying, in her nature, much that was honest, compassionate, and even noble.