compatriot


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com·pa·tri·ot

 (kəm-pā′trē-ət, -ŏt′)
n.
1. A person from one's own country.
2. A colleague.

[French compatriote, from Late Latin compatriōta : Latin com-, com- + Late Latin patriōta, countryman; see patriot.]

com·pa′tri·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.

compatriot

(kəmˈpætrɪət)
n
a person from one's own country
[C17: from French compatriote, from Late Latin compatriōta; see patriot]
comˌpatriˈotic adj
comˈpatriotism n

com•pa•tri•ot

(kəmˈpeɪ tri ət; esp. Brit. -ˈpæ-)

n.
1. a fellow countryman or countrywoman.
2. a colleague or companion; peer.
adj.
3. of the same country.
[1605–15; < Late Latin compatriōta. See com-, patriot]
com•pa`tri•ot′ic (-ˈɒt ɪk) adj.
com•pa′tri•ot•ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.compatriot - a person from your own country
national, subject - a person who owes allegiance to that nation; "a monarch has a duty to his subjects"
countryman - a man from your own country
countrywoman - a woman from your own country

compatriot

noun fellow countryman, countryman, fellow citizen He beat his compatriots in the final.

compatriot

noun
A person who is from one's own country:
Translations
مُواطِن، من نَفْس البَلَد
krajan
landsmand
compatriotacompatriotemaanmies
honfitárs
samlandi
tėvynainis
tautietis
landsmanlandsmaninna

compatriot

[kəmˈpætrɪət] Ncompatriota mf

compatriot

[kəmˈpætrɪət] n (= countryman) → compatriote mf

compatriot

nLandsmann m, → Landsmännin f

compatriot

[kəmˈpætrɪət] ncompatriota m/f

compatriot

(kəmˈpӕtriət) , ((American) -ˈpei-) noun
a fellow-countryman. Many of his compatriots were killed in the war.
References in classic literature ?
As I was saying; if Monsieur Manette had not died; if he had suddenly and silently disappeared; if he had been spirited away; if it had not been difficult to guess to what dreadful place, though no art could trace him; if he had an enemy in some compatriot who could exercise a privilege that I in my own time have known the boldest people afraid to speak of in a whisper, across the water there; for instance, the privilege of filling up blank forms for the consignment of any one to the oblivion of a prison for any length of time; if his wife had implored the king, the queen, the court, the clergy, for any tidings of him, and all quite in vain;--then the history of your father would have been the history of this unfortunate gentleman, the Doctor of Beauvais.
They then posted themselves on the level ground at the outlet of the Sierra, and as soon as Don Quixote and his companions emerged from it the curate began to examine him very deliberately, as though he were striving to recognise him, and after having stared at him for some time he hastened towards him with open arms exclaiming, "A happy meeting with the mirror of chivalry, my worthy compatriot Don Quixote of La Mancha, the flower and cream of high breeding, the protection and relief of the distressed, the quintessence of knights-errant
The other treated him at once to an exciting beverage, and expatiated on the pleasure of meeting a compatriot in a foreign land; to hear him, you would have thought they had encountered in Central Africa.
At this demand D'Artagnan gave his name very modestly, emphasized the title of compatriot, and begged the servant who had put the question to him to request a moment's audience of M.
Cropoli, in his character of a compatriot, was indulgent towards Pittrino, which was the name of the artist.
Your success depends upon yourself; you can have a palace, also," said Bonaparte, watching his compatriot with a keen eye.
He remembered that a cynical compatriot had once told him that American women--the pretty ones, and this gave a largeness to the axiom-- were at once the most exacting in the world and the least endowed with a sense of indebtedness.
None but a compatriot," his Excellency declared, "could have performed that majestic dance in such a way.
You have a right to be unjust to them, monsieur; they are your compatriots.
I think the authoress's compatriots, who probably did not like her much better that she did them, jeered at the absurdity of Ulysses' conduct, and saw the Asinelli or "donkeys," not as the rock thrown by Polyphemus, but as the boat itself containing Ulysses and his men.
De Winter took us to the house of a Spaniard, who, he said, had become naturalized as an Englishman by the guineas of his new compatriots.
The "family," for the rest, consists altogether of our beloved compatriots, and of still more beloved Englanders.