competitive exclusion


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Related to competitive exclusion: Competitive exclusion principle, Resource partitioning

competitive exclusion

n
(Environmental Science) ecology the dominance of one species over another when both are competing for the same resources, etc
References in periodicals archive ?
When the Nurmi concept or CE concept was first discovered, researchers believed that a probiotic needed to mimic the full complement of native microflora to achieve competitive exclusion.
Today, the animal antimicrobials and antibiotics market showcase a sluggish growth, owing to the regulatory authorities restricting their use, increased usage of in-feed enzymes, competitive exclusion products and probiotics as an alternative to antibiotics and prophylactic use of antibiotics being replaced by good husbandry, environment and hygienic practices.
histolyticum colonisation through mechanisms including competitive exclusion.
The utilization of similar niches seems to be in conflict with the competitive exclusion principle, which holds that two or more species cannot permanently coexist if they have identical ecological needs (Levin, 1970).
The topics include prosimians and the second radiation, paleobiogeographical perspectives on the origin of the Platyrrhini, species diversity and diet in monkeys and apes during the Miocene, the single-species hypothesis of competitive exclusion among lower Pleistocene hominids, and a molecular approach to the question of human origins.
Lab activities cover concepts including predator-prey dynamics, carrying capacity, resource partitioning, the competitive exclusion principle, keystone species, food webs, limiting nutrients, and succession.
They proposed that a GBS-specific immune defect might exist in HIV-infected pregnant women and suggested that this defect could be blurred by competitive exclusion of GBS as a consequence of changes in microbial flora at lower CD4 counts.
Also, some works have been done to evaluate competitive exclusion of potential probiotics on rainbow trout [16,10,9].
ARS scientists in Stoneville, Mississippi, are also using competitive exclusion to manage aflatoxin in corn.
Although one may want to invoke competitive exclusion for the replacement of S.
2002), because of the competitive exclusion of one or more functionally similar species (Leibold, 1998).

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