complement


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Related to complement: compliment, Complement system

com·ple·ment

 (kŏm′plə-mənt)
n.
1.
a. Something that completes, makes up a whole, or brings to perfection: a sauce that is a fine complement to fish.
b. The quantity or number needed to make up a whole: shelves with a full complement of books.
c. The full crew of personnel required to run a ship.
d. Either of two parts that complete the whole or mutually complete each other.
2. An angle related to another so that the sum of their measures is 90°.
3. Grammar A word or words used to complete a predicate construction, especially the object or indirect object of a verb, for example, the phrase to eat ice cream in We like to eat ice cream.
4. Music An interval that completes an octave when added to a given interval.
5. Immunology A complex system of proteins found in normal blood plasma that combines with antibodies to destroy pathogenic bacteria and other foreign cells. Also called alexin.
6. Mathematics & Logic For a universal set, the set of all elements in the set that are not in a specified subset.
7. A complementary color.
tr.v. (-mĕnt′) com·ple·ment·ed, com·ple·ment·ing, com·ple·ments
To serve as a complement to: Roses in a silver bowl complement the handsome cherry table.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin complēmentum, from complēre, to fill out; see complete.]
Usage Note: Complement and compliment, though quite distinct in meaning, are sometimes confused because they are pronounced the same. As a noun, complement means "something that completes or brings to perfection" (The antique silver was a complement to the beautifully set table); used as a verb it means "to serve as a complement to." The noun compliment means "an expression or act of courtesy or praise" (They gave us a compliment on our beautifully set table), while the verb means "to pay a compliment to."

complement

n
1. a person or thing that completes something
2. one of two parts that make up a whole or complete each other
3. a complete amount, number, etc (often in the phrase full complement)
4. (Nautical Terms) the officers and crew needed to man a ship
5. (Grammar) grammar
a. a noun phrase that follows a copula or similar verb, as for example an idiot in the sentence He is an idiot
b. a clause that serves as the subject or direct object of a verb or the direct object of a preposition, as for example that he would be early in the sentence I hoped that he would be early
6. (Mathematics) maths the angle that, when added to a specified angle, produces a right angle
7. (Logic) logic maths the class of all things, or of all members of a given universe of discourse, that are not members of a given set
8. (Mathematics) logic maths the class of all things, or of all members of a given universe of discourse, that are not members of a given set
9. (Music, other) music the inverted form of an interval that, when added to the interval, completes the octave: the sixth is the complement of the third.
10. (Microbiology) immunol a group of proteins in the blood serum that, when activated by antibodies, causes destruction of alien cells, such as bacteria
vb
(tr) to add to, make complete, or form a complement to
[C14: from Latin complēmentum, from complēre to fill up, from com- (intensive) + plēre to fill]
Usage: Avoid confusion with compliment

com•ple•ment

(n. ˈkɒm plə mənt; v. -ˌmɛnt)

n.
1. something that completes or makes perfect: A good wine is a complement to a good meal.
2. the quantity or amount that completes anything: We now have a full complement of bridge players.
3. either of two parts or things needed to complete the whole; counterpart.
4. the full number of officers and crew required on a ship.
5.
a. a word or group of words that completes a grammatical construction in the predicate and that describes or is identified with the subject or object, as small in The house is small or president in They elected him president. Compare object complement, subject complement.
b. any word or group of words used to complete a grammatical construction, esp. in the predicate, including adverbials, infinitives, and sometimes objects.
6. the quantity by which an angle or an arc falls short of 90° or a quarter of a circle. Compare supplement (def. 3).
7. Math. the set of all the elements of a universal set not included in a given set.
8. a musical interval that completes an octave when added to a given interval.
9.
a. a set of about 20 proteins that circulate in the blood and react in various combinations to promote the destruction of any cell displaying foreign surfaces or immune complexes.
b. any of the proteins in the complement system, designated C1, C2, etc.
v.t.
11. to complete; form a complement to.
12. Obs. to compliment.
v.i.
13. Obs. to compliment.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin complēmentum something that completes]
com′ple•ment`er, n.
syn: complement, supplement both mean to make additions to something; a lack or deficiency is implied. To complement means to complete or perfect a whole; it often refers to putting together two things, each of which supplies what is lacking in the other: Statements from different points of view may complement each other. To supplement is to add something in order to enhance, extend, or improve a whole: Some additional remarks supplemented the sales presentation.

com·ple·ment

(kŏm′plə-mənt)
1. A system of proteins found in the serum of the blood that helps antibodies destroy disease-causing bacteria or other foreign substances, especially antigens.
2. A complementary color.

Complement

 the full amount; a set; the total number of personnel of a ship or military establishment; a cargo; the amount needed to fill a conveyance.
Example: complement of cloves, 1697.

complement

compliment

These words can both be verbs or nouns. When they are verbs, they are pronounced /'kɒmplɪment/. When they are nouns, they are pronounced /'kɒmplɪmənt/.

1. 'complement'

If one thing complements another, the two things increase each other's good qualities when they are brought together.

Nutmeg, parsley and cider all complement the flavour of these beans well.
Current advances in hardware development nicely complement British software skills.
2. 'compliment'

If you compliment someone, you tell them that you admire something that they have or something that they have done.

They complimented me on the way I looked.
She is to be complimented for handling the situation so well.

A compliment is something that you do or say to someone to show your admiration for them.

She took his acceptance as a great compliment.

You say that you pay someone a compliment.

He knew that he had just been paid a great compliment.

complement


Past participle: complemented
Gerund: complementing

Imperative
complement
complement
Present
I complement
you complement
he/she/it complements
we complement
you complement
they complement
Preterite
I complemented
you complemented
he/she/it complemented
we complemented
you complemented
they complemented
Present Continuous
I am complementing
you are complementing
he/she/it is complementing
we are complementing
you are complementing
they are complementing
Present Perfect
I have complemented
you have complemented
he/she/it has complemented
we have complemented
you have complemented
they have complemented
Past Continuous
I was complementing
you were complementing
he/she/it was complementing
we were complementing
you were complementing
they were complementing
Past Perfect
I had complemented
you had complemented
he/she/it had complemented
we had complemented
you had complemented
they had complemented
Future
I will complement
you will complement
he/she/it will complement
we will complement
you will complement
they will complement
Future Perfect
I will have complemented
you will have complemented
he/she/it will have complemented
we will have complemented
you will have complemented
they will have complemented
Future Continuous
I will be complementing
you will be complementing
he/she/it will be complementing
we will be complementing
you will be complementing
they will be complementing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been complementing
you have been complementing
he/she/it has been complementing
we have been complementing
you have been complementing
they have been complementing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been complementing
you will have been complementing
he/she/it will have been complementing
we will have been complementing
you will have been complementing
they will have been complementing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been complementing
you had been complementing
he/she/it had been complementing
we had been complementing
you had been complementing
they had been complementing
Conditional
I would complement
you would complement
he/she/it would complement
we would complement
you would complement
they would complement
Past Conditional
I would have complemented
you would have complemented
he/she/it would have complemented
we would have complemented
you would have complemented
they would have complemented

complement

1. A word or group of words that follows a verb and completes a predicate.
2. Proteins in blood plasma activated by and helping to dissolve foreign cells such as bacteria.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.complement - a word or phrase used to complete a grammatical construction
grammatical construction, construction, expression - a group of words that form a constituent of a sentence and are considered as a single unit; "I concluded from his awkward constructions that he was a foreigner"
2.complement - a complete number or quantity; "a full complement"
count - the total number counted; "a blood count"
3.complement - number needed to make up a whole force; "a full complement of workers"
manpower, men, work force, workforce, hands - the force of workers available
ship's company, company - crew of a ship including the officers; the whole force or personnel of a ship
4.complement - something added to complete or embellish or make perfect; "a fine wine is a perfect complement to the dinner"; "wild rice was served as an accompaniment to the main dish"
adjunct - something added to another thing but not an essential part of it
5.complement - one of a series of enzymes in the blood serum that are part of the immune response
immune reaction, immune response, immunologic response - a bodily defense reaction that recognizes an invading substance (an antigen: such as a virus or fungus or bacteria or transplanted organ) and produces antibodies specific against that antigen
enzyme - any of several complex proteins that are produced by cells and act as catalysts in specific biochemical reactions
6.complement - either of two parts that mutually complete each other
counterpart, opposite number, vis-a-vis - a person or thing having the same function or characteristics as another
Verb1.complement - make complete or perfect; supply what is wanting or form the complement to; "I need some pepper to complement the sweet touch in the soup"
balance, equilibrise, equilibrize, equilibrate - bring into balance or equilibrium; "She has to balance work and her domestic duties"; "balance the two weights"

complement

verb
1. enhance, complete, improve, boost, crown, add to, set off, heighten, augment, round off Nutmeg complements the flavour of these beans perfectly.
noun
1. accompaniment, companion, accessory, completion, finishing touch, rounding-off, adjunct, supplement The green wallpaper is the perfect complement to the old pine of the dresser.
2. total, capacity, quota, aggregate, contingent, entirety Each ship had a complement of around a dozen officers and 250 men.
Usage: This is sometimes confused with compliment but the two words have very different meanings. As the synonyms show, the verb form of complement means `to enhance' and `to complete' something. In contrast, common synonyms of compliment as a verb are praise, commend, and flatter.

complement

noun
1. Something that completes another:
2. Something added to another for embellishment or completion:
verb
To supply what is lacking:
complete, fill in (or out), round (off or out), supplement.
Translations
عَد مُكَمِّلكَلِمَه مُتَمِّمَه للخَبَريُكَمِّل، يَمْلأ
doplněkdoplnitdoplnění
fylde oppredikativpredikatsordsupplementtillæg
täiendama
attribuuttibinäärikomplementtikahden komplementtikomplementtikomplementtiväri
להשלים
állítmánykiegészítõteljes szám
full tala, tilætlaîur fjöldifyllasagnfylling
差集合補集合
komplektaskomplektavimaspapildantispapildytisukomplektavimas
papildinājumspapildinātpapildinātājs
dopolnilodopolnjevati se
tamamlamaktamamlayıcı şeytamlayıcıtümleç

complement

A. [ˈkɒmplɪmənt] N
1. (gen) → complemento m
to be a complement tocomplementar a
this wine is the perfect complement to smoked salmoneste vino complementa perfectamente al salmón ahumado
2. [of staff] (esp on ship) → dotación f, personal m
the orchestra did not have its full complement of brassla orquesta no contaba con su sección de metales completa
B. [ˈkɒmplɪment] VTcomplementar

complement

[ˈkɒmplɪmənt] n
(= supplement) → complément m
a complement to sth → un complément à qch
(= total number) [staff] → effectif m
The borough will be 100 teachers short of a full complement of 2,500 → La municipalité aura 100 professeurs manquants par rapport à un effectif total de 2,500.
to have the full complement of sth (= proper number or amount) → avoir la totalité de qch
They did not have the full complement of 11 players on the pitch → Ils n'avaient pas la totalité des onze joueurs sur le terrain.
[ˈkɒmplɪmɛnt] vtcompléter
to complement each other → se compléter

complement

n
(= addition)Ergänzung f (→ to +gen); (to perfect sth) → Vervollkommnung f (→ to +gen); (= colour)Komplementärfarbe f(to zu)
(= full number)volle Stärke; (= crew of ship)Besatzung f; the battalion didn’t have its full complement of soldiersdas Bataillon hatte seine Sollstärke nicht; we’ve got our full complement in the office nowunser Büro ist jetzt komplett or voll besetzt
(Gram) → Ergänzung f
(Math: = angle) → Ergänzungswinkel m
vt
(= add to)ergänzen; (= make perfect)vervollkommnen, abrunden; (colour) → herausbringen; to complement each othersich ergänzen; (colours)aufeinander abgestimmt sein
(Gram) → die Ergänzung bilden zu
(Math) → zu 90° ergänzen

complement

[n ˈkɒmplɪmənt; vb ˈkɒmplɪˌmɛnt]
1. n
a. (gen) (Gram, Math) → complemento
b. (staff, crew) → effettivo
2. vt (enhance) → accompagnarsi bene a, completare

complement

(ˈkompləmənt) noun
1. in a sentence, the words of the predicate, not including the verb.
2. (something added to make) a complete number or amount.
verb
to complete, fill up.
compleˈmentary adjective

the complement (not compliment) of a verb.

com·ple·ment

n. complemento, sustancia proteínica presente en el plasma que destruye las bacterias y las células con que se pone en contacto.

complement

n complemento
References in classic literature ?
It had kept its boughs unshattered, and its full complement of leaves; and the whole in perfect verdure, except a single branch, that, by the earlier change with which the elm-tree sometimes prophesies the autumn, had been transmuted to bright gold.
But the ship, having her full complement of seamen, spurned his suit; and not all the King his father's influence could prevail.
In the tractability with which, at my wish, you forsook a study in which you were interested, and adopted another because it interested me; in the untiring assiduity with which you have since persevered in it--in the unflagging energy and unshaken temper with which you have met its difficulties--I acknowledge the complement of the qualities I seek.
She inquired of the coachman if the outside places (all of which were not yet filled up) had their full complement of passengers also.
The viceroy of Tigre had inquired of me a few days before how many men one India ship carried, and being told that the complement of some was a thousand men, he compared that answer with the report then spread over all the country, that there were eighteen Portuguese vessels on the coast of Adel, and concluded that they were manned by an army of eighteen thousand men; then considering what had been achieved by four hundred, under the command of Don Christopher de Gama, he thought Abyssinia already ravaged, or subjected to the King of Portugal.
The bourgeoisie has disclosed how it came to pass that the brutal display of vigour in the Middle Ages, which Reactionists so much admire, found its fitting complement in the most slothful indolence.
There was a full complement of passengers on board, among them English, many Americans, a large number of coolies on their way to California, and several East Indian officers, who were spending their vacation in making the tour of the world.
and his predecessors; and he saw that the complement was not half empty.
One of the first objects was to recruit a complement of Canadian voyageurs from the disbanded herd usually to be found loitering about the place.
With a farewell smile she sought the complement of her consolation in the eyes of the American visitor, and perceiving in them a certain mysterious brilliancy, it is not improbable that she may have flattered herself she had found it.
George salutes the gentleman but otherwise sits bolt upright and profoundly silent--very forward in his chair, as if the full complement of regulation appendages for a field-day hung about him.
It appears too by his laws, that he intends to establish only a small state, as all the artificers are to belong to the public, and add nothing to the complement of citizens; but if all those who are to be employed in public works are to be the slaves of the public, it should be done in the same manner as it is at Epidamnum, and as Diophantus formerly regulated it at Athens.