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Related to completed: Completed Contract Method


adj. com·plet·er, com·plet·est
1. Having all necessary or normal parts, components, or steps; entire: a complete medical history; a complete set of dishes.
2. Botany Having all principal parts, namely, the sepals, petals, stamens, and pistil or pistils. Used of a flower.
3. Having come to an end; concluded: The renovation of the kitchen is complete.
a. Absolute; thorough: complete control; a complete mystery.
b. Accomplished; consummate: a complete musician.
5. Football Caught in bounds by a receiver: a complete pass.
tr.v. com·plet·ed, com·plet·ing, com·pletes
1. To bring to a finish or an end: She has completed her studies.
2. To make whole, with all necessary elements or parts: A second child would complete their family. Fill in the blanks to complete the form.
3. Football To throw (a forward pass) that is caught in bounds by a receiver.

[Middle English complet, from Latin complētus, past participle of complēre, to fill out : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + plēre, to fill; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

com·plete′ly adv.
com·plete′ness n.
com·ple′tive adj.
Synonyms: complete, finish, close, end, conclude, terminate
These verbs mean to bring to a natural or proper stopping point. Complete and finish suggest the final stage in an undertaking: "Nothing worth doing is completed in our lifetime" (Reinhold Niebuhr). "Give us the tools, and we will finish the job" (Winston S. Churchill).
Close and end both imply bringing something ongoing to a conclusion: The band closed the concert with an encore. We ended the meal with fruit and cheese. End can also mean putting a stop to something, often with finality: "Many advocates say [putting] laptops in schools is a promising way to end the digital divide between the races" (Char Simons). "It left him more exposed than ever, forcing him to end the career he loved" (Molly Worthen).
Conclude is more formal than close and end: The author concluded the article by restating the major points. Terminate suggests reaching an established limit: The playing of the national anthem terminated the station's broadcast for the night. It also indicates the dissolution of a formal arrangement: The firm terminated my contract yesterday.
Usage Note: Although complete is often held to be an absolute term like perfect or chief, and supposedly not subject to comparison, it is often modified by words like more and less in standard usage. As far back as 1965, a majority of the Usage Panel accepted the example His book is the most complete treatment of the subject. See Usage Note at absolute.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.completed - successfully completed or brought to an endcompleted - successfully completed or brought to an end; "his mission accomplished he took a vacation"; "the completed project"; "the joy of a realized ambition overcame him"
complete - having every necessary or normal part or component or step; "a complete meal"; "a complete wardrobe"; "a complete set of the Britannica"; "a complete set of china"; "a complete defeat"; "a complete accounting"
2.completed - (of a marriage) completed by the first act of sexual intercourse after the ceremony
consummated - brought to completion; "a consummated transaction"
3.completed - caught; "a completed forward pass"
football, football game - any of various games played with a ball (round or oval) in which two teams try to kick or carry or propel the ball into each other's goal
complete - having every necessary or normal part or component or step; "a complete meal"; "a complete wardrobe"; "a complete set of the Britannica"; "a complete set of china"; "a complete defeat"; "a complete accounting"
References in classic literature ?
Scarlet with shame and anger, Amy went to and fro six dreadful times, and as each doomed couple, looking oh, so plump and juicy, fell from her reluctant hands, a shout from the street completed the anguish of the girls, for it told them that their feast was being exulted over by the little Irish children, who were their sworn foes.
That night saw the preparations of Ned and Tom about completed.
Some of those boys came straight from the cornfields with only a summer's wages in their pockets, hung on through the four years, shabby and underfed, and completed the course by really heroic self-sacrifice.
The picture completed bore no resemblance to Madame Ratignolle.
The simple array of the chosen band was soon completed.
By the time this latter purchase was completed, the elderly gentleman had resumed his way, and turned the street corner.
She presents the curious anomaly of the most solid masonry joining with oak and hemp in constituting the completed ship.
Now and then there were rumors and murmurs in the Board of Aldermen, and once there was a committee to investigate--but each time another small fortune was paid over, and the rumors died away; until at last the city woke up with a start to find the work completed.
During this aside between Mose and Pete, two empty casks had been rolled into the cabin, and being secured from rolling, by stones on each side, boards were laid across them, which arrangement, together with the turning down of certain tubs and pails, and the disposing of the rickety chairs, at last completed the preparation.
A good many dinners were not completed, yet, but no matter, they could be eaten cold, after the battle; therefore everybody crowded forth to see.
The day was completed and crowned in a pe- culiarly satisfactory way: Becky teased her mother to appoint the next day for the long-promised and long- delayed picnic, and she consented.
When the first brown gingham frock was completed, the child seized what she thought an opportune moment and asked her aunt Miranda if she might have another color for the next one.

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