completely


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com·plete

 (kəm-plēt′)
adj. com·plet·er, com·plet·est
1. Having all necessary or normal parts, components, or steps; entire: a complete medical history; a complete set of dishes.
2. Botany Having all principal parts, namely, the sepals, petals, stamens, and pistil or pistils. Used of a flower.
3. Having come to an end; concluded: The renovation of the kitchen is complete.
4.
a. Absolute; thorough: complete control; a complete mystery.
b. Accomplished; consummate: a complete musician.
5. Football Caught in bounds by a receiver: a complete pass.
tr.v. com·plet·ed, com·plet·ing, com·pletes
1. To bring to a finish or an end: She has completed her studies.
2. To make whole, with all necessary elements or parts: A second child would complete their family. Fill in the blanks to complete the form.
3. Football To throw (a forward pass) that is caught in bounds by a receiver.

[Middle English complet, from Latin complētus, past participle of complēre, to fill out : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + plēre, to fill; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

com·plete′ly adv.
com·plete′ness n.
com·ple′tive adj.
Synonyms: complete, finish, close, end, conclude, terminate
These verbs mean to bring to a natural or proper stopping point. Complete and finish suggest the final stage in an undertaking: "Nothing worth doing is completed in our lifetime" (Reinhold Niebuhr)."Give us the tools, and we will finish the job" (Winston S. Churchill).
Close and end both imply bringing something ongoing to a conclusion: The band closed the concert with an encore. We ended the meal with fruit and cheese. End can also mean putting a stop to something, often with finality: "Many advocates say [putting] laptops in schools is a promising way to end the digital divide between the races" (Char Simons)."It left him more exposed than ever, forcing him to end the career he loved" (Molly Worthen).
Conclude is more formal than close and end: The author concluded the article by restating the major points. Terminate suggests reaching an established limit: The playing of the national anthem terminated the station's broadcast for the night. It also indicates the dissolution of a formal arrangement: The firm terminated my contract yesterday.
Usage Note: Although complete is often held to be an absolute term like perfect or chief, and supposedly not subject to comparison, it is often modified by words like more and less in standard usage. As far back as 1965, a majority of the Usage Panel accepted the example His book is the most complete treatment of the subject. See Usage Note at absolute.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.completely - to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent (`whole' is often used informally for `wholly')completely - to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent (`whole' is often used informally for `wholly'); "he was wholly convinced"; "entirely satisfied with the meal"; "it was completely different from what we expected"; "was completely at fault"; "a totally new situation"; "the directions were all wrong"; "it was not altogether her fault"; "an altogether new approach"; "a whole new idea"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
2.completely - so as to be complete; with everything necessary; "he had filled out the form completely"; "the apartment was completely furnished"

completely

completely

adverb
1. To the fullest extent:
Informal: clean, clear.
Idioms: in toto, through and through.
2. In a complete manner:
Idioms: in and out, inside out, up and down.
Translations
باِلكامِلكُلِّيّا، تَماما
zcelanaprostoúplně
fuldstændigfuldstændigthelt
täysinkokonaan
potpuno
teljesen
fullkomlega, algerlega
全く
완전히
popolnoma
fullständigt
อย่างทั้งหมด
tamamentamamiyle
hoàn toàn

completely

[kəmˈpliːtlɪ] ADVcompletamente, totalmente
something completely differentalgo completamente or totalmente diferente
completely and utterly ridiculoustotal y absolutamente ridículo
almost completelycasi completamente, casi por completo
I'm sorry, I completely forgotlo siento, me olvidé completamente or totalmente or por completo
she's not completely recovered yetaún no está completamente or totalmente or del todo recuperada

completely

[kəmˈpliːtli] advcomplètement

completely

advvöllig, vollkommen; he’s completely wronger irrt sich gewaltig, er hat völlig unrecht; he’s not completely normaler ist nicht ganz normal

completely

[kəmˈpliːtlɪ] advcompletamente

complete

(kəmˈpliːt) adjective
1. whole; with nothing missing. a complete set of Shakespeare's plays.
2. thorough. My car needs a complete overhaul; a complete surprise.
3. finished. My picture will soon be complete.
verb
to finish; to make complete. When will he complete the job?; This stamp completes my collection.
comˈpletely adverb
I am not completely satisfied.
comˈpleteness noun
comˈpletion (-ʃən) noun
finishing or state of being finished. You will be paid on completion of the work.

completely

باِلكامِل naprosto fuldstændig völlig εντελώς completamente täysin complètement potpuno completamente 全く 완전히 helemaal helt zupełnie completamente полностью fullständigt อย่างทั้งหมด tamamen hoàn toàn 完全地
References in classic literature ?
Before the evening was half over, Jo felt so completely disillusioned, that she sat down in a corner to recover herself.
shouted Tom, as he struck the creature, knocking it into the corner of the tent with a thud that told it must be completely stunned, if not killed.
This feeling seemed completely to take possession of Mr.
Every effort to detect the point most regarded by the runner was completely frustrated by the tremulous glances of his organs, which seemed not to rest a single instant on any particular object, and which, at the same time, could be hardly said to move.
Happily, their father, completely absorbed in a practical, scientific, and approving contemplation of the topography and material resources of the scene of his future labors, had no time to notice their defection.
A brown beard, not too silken in its texture, fringed his chin, but as yet without completely hiding it; he wore a short mustache, too, and his dark, high-featured countenance looked all the better for these natural ornaments.
There is the little domestic scenery of the well-known apartment; the chairs, with each its separate individuality; the centre-table, sustaining a work-basket, a volume or two, and an extinguished lamp; the sofa; the book-case; the picture on the wall -- all these details, so completely seen, are so spiritualised by the unusual light, that they seem to lose their actual substance, and become things of intellect.
It was a matter of no little vanity to him on Sundays, to take his station in front of the church gallery, with a band of chosen singers; where, in his own mind, he completely carried away the palm from the parson.
I slept immediately and, as I afterward knew, till about one o'clock; but when I woke it was to sit straight up, as completely roused as if a hand had shook me.
But then, what to make of his unearthly complexion, that part of it, I mean, lying round about, and completely independent of the squares of tattooing.
It should not have been omitted that previous to completely stripping the body of the leviathan, he was beheaded.
The want of variety in the scenery from Hospenthal made the KAHKAHPONEEKA wearisome; but let none be discouraged; no one can fail to be completely R'ECOMPENS'EE for his fatigue, when he sees, for the first time, the monarch of the Oberland, the tremendous Finsteraarhorn.

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