complex


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Related to complex: inferiority complex, complex sentence, B complex, superiority complex, Complex numbers

com·plex

 (kəm-plĕks′, kŏm′plĕks′)
adj.
1.
a. Consisting of interconnected or interwoven parts; composite: complex equipment with multiple components.
b. Composed of two or more units: a complex carbohydrate.
2. Difficult to understand for being intricate or involved; complicated: a complex problem.
3. Grammar
a. Consisting of at least one bound form. Used of a word.
b. Consisting of an independent clause and at least one other independent or dependent clause. Used of a sentence.
n. (kŏm′plĕks′)
1. A whole composed of interconnected or interwoven parts: a complex of cities and suburbs; the military-industrial complex.
2. A building or group of buildings used for a single purpose: a sports complex.
3. In psychoanalysis, a group of related, often repressed ideas and impulses that compel characteristic or habitual patterns of thought, feelings, and behavior.
4. An exaggerated or obsessive concern or fear: has a complex about his weight.
5. Medicine The combination of factors, symptoms, or signs of a disease or disorder that forms a syndrome.

[Latin complexus, past participle of complectī, to entwine; see complect.]

com·plex′ly adv.
com·plex′ness n.
Synonyms: complex, complicated, intricate, involved, tangled
These adjectives mean having parts so interconnected as to hamper comprehension or perception of the whole. Complex implies a combination of many interwoven parts: The composer transformed a simple folk tune into a complex set of variations. Complicated stresses a relationship of parts that affect each other in elaborate, often obscure ways: The party's complicated platform confused many voters. Intricate refers to a pattern of intertwining parts that is difficult to follow or analyze: "No one could soar into a more intricate labyrinth of refined phraseology" (Anthony Trollope).
Involved implies a close but confusing interconnection between many different parts: The movie's plot was criticized as being too involved. Tangled strongly suggests the random twisting of many parts: "Oh, what a tangled web we weave, / When first we practice to deceive!" (Sir Walter Scott).

complex

(ˈkɒmplɛks)
adj
1. made up of various interconnected parts; composite
2. (of thoughts, writing, etc) intricate or involved
3. (Grammar) grammar
a. (of a word) containing at least one bound form
b. (of a noun phrase) containing both a lexical noun and an embedded clause, as for example the italicized parts of the following sentence: I didn't know the man who served me
c. (of a sentence) formed by subordination of one clause to another
4. (Mathematics) maths of or involving one or more complex numbers
n
5. a whole made up of interconnected or related parts: a building complex.
6. (Psychoanalysis) psychoanal a group of emotional ideas or impulses that have been banished from the conscious mind but that continue to influence a person's behaviour
7. (Psychology) informal an obsession or excessive fear: he's got a complex about cats.
8. (Chemistry) Also called: coordination compound a chemical compound in which molecules, groups, or ions are attached to a central metal atom, esp a transition metal atom, by coordinate bonds
9. (Chemistry) any chemical compound in which one molecule is linked to another by a coordinate bond
[C17: from Latin complexus, from complectī to entwine, from com- together + plectere to braid]
ˈcomplexly adv
ˈcomplexness n
Usage: Complex is sometimes wrongly used where complicated is meant. Complex is properly used to say only that something consists of several parts. It should not be used to say that, because something consists of many parts, it is difficult to understand or analyse

com•plex

(adj., v. kəmˈplɛks, ˈkɒm plɛks; n. ˈkɒm plɛks)

adj.
1. composed of many interconnected parts; compound; composite: a complex system.
2. characterized by a complicated or involved arrangement of parts, units, etc.: complex machinery.
3. so complicated or intricate as to be hard to understand or deal with: a complex problem.
4. (of a word) consisting of two or more parts, at least one of which is a bound form, as childish, which consists of the word child and the bound form -ish.
5. pertaining to or using complex numbers: complex methods; complex vector space.
n.
6. an often intricate or complicated association or assemblage of related things, parts, units, etc., forming a whole: an apartment complex.
7. a cluster of interrelated, emotion-charged ideas, desires, and impulses that may be wholly or partly suppressed but influence attitudes, associations, and behavior.
8. an obsessive notion or concern.
9. Also called coordination compound. a chemical compound in which independently existing molecules or ions of a nonmetal form coordinate bonds with a metal atom or ion.Compare ligand (def. 2).
10. an entity composed of molecules in which the constituents maintain much of their chemical identity: receptor-hormone complex.
v.t.
11. Chem. to form a complex with.
v.i.
12. Chem. to form a complex.
[1645–55; (adj.) < Latin complexus, past participle of complectī, complectere to embrace, encompass, include]
com•plex′ly, adv.
com•plex′ness, n.

Complex

 an object or framework made up from parts; a group of buildings forming part of related whole.
Examples: complex of doctrine, 1862; of fluid atoms, 1652; of planets, 1672; of psychoanalysts—Lipton, 1970.

complex

An idea which is partly or wholly repressed, but which determines your opinion of yourself, may produce a complex. A woman may not consciously recall being teased as a child for being fat, for instance, but the idea may remain in her unconscious and as a result she may develop a complex about her appearance, whatever her adult build.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.complex - a conceptual whole made up of complicated and related partscomplex - a conceptual whole made up of complicated and related parts; "the complex of shopping malls, houses, and roads created a new town"
whole - all of something including all its component elements or parts; "Europe considered as a whole"; "the whole of American literature"
hybrid - a composite of mixed origin; "the vice-presidency is a hybrid of administrative and legislative offices"
syndrome - a complex of concurrent things; "every word has a syndrome of meanings"
2.complex - a compound described in terms of the central atom to which other atoms are bound or coordinated
hydrochloride - a complex consisting of an organic base in association with hydrogen chloride
chemical compound, compound - (chemistry) a substance formed by chemical union of two or more elements or ingredients in definite proportion by weight
3.complex - (psychoanalysis) a combination of emotions and impulses that have been rejected from awareness but still influence a person's behavior
feeling - the experiencing of affective and emotional states; "she had a feeling of euphoria"; "he had terrible feelings of guilt"; "I disliked him and the feeling was mutual"
depth psychology, psychoanalysis, analysis - a set of techniques for exploring underlying motives and a method of treating various mental disorders; based on the theories of Sigmund Freud; "his physician recommended psychoanalysis"
Oedipal complex, Oedipus complex - a complex of males; desire to possess the mother sexually and to exclude the father; said to be a source of personality disorders if unresolved
Electra complex - a complex of females; sexual attraction to the father
inferiority complex - a sense of personal inferiority arising from conflict between the desire to be noticed and the fear of being humiliated
4.complex - a whole structure (as a building) made up of interconnected or related structurescomplex - a whole structure (as a building) made up of interconnected or related structures
college - a complex of buildings in which an institution of higher education is housed
industrial plant, plant, works - buildings for carrying on industrial labor; "they built a large plant to manufacture automobiles"
ribbon development - building complex in a continuous row along a road
structure, construction - a thing constructed; a complex entity constructed of many parts; "the structure consisted of a series of arches"; "she wore her hair in an amazing construction of whirls and ribbons"
Adj.1.complex - complicated in structure; consisting of interconnected parts; "a complex set of variations based on a simple folk melody"; "a complex mass of diverse laws and customs"
difficult, hard - not easy; requiring great physical or mental effort to accomplish or comprehend or endure; "a difficult task"; "nesting places on the cliffs are difficult of access"; "difficult times"; "why is it so hard for you to keep a secret?"
compound - composed of more than one part; "compound leaves are composed of several lobes; "compound flower heads"
simple - having few parts; not complex or complicated or involved; "a simple problem"; "simple mechanisms"; "a simple design"; "a simple substance"

complex

adjective
1. compound, compounded, multiple, composite, manifold, heterogeneous, multifarious His complex compositions are built up of many overlapping layers.
noun
1. structure, system, scheme, network, organization, aggregate, composite, synthesis Our philosophy is a complex of many tightly interrelated ideas.
2. (Informal) obsession, preoccupation, phobia, fixation, fixed idea, idée fixe (French) I have never had a complex about my weight.
Usage: Although complex and complicated are close in meaning, care should be taken when using one as a synonym of the other. Complex should be used to say that something consists of several parts rather than that it is difficult to understand, analyse, or deal with, which is what complicated inherently means. In the following real example a clear distinction is made between the two words: the British benefits system is phenomenally complex and is administered by a complicated range of agencies.

complex

adjective
1. Consisting of two or more interconnected parts:
2. Difficult to understand because of intricacy:
noun
1. A usually large entity composed of interconnected parts:
2. A center of organization, supply, or activity:
Military: installation.
3. An exaggerated concern:
Informal: hang-up.
Translations
مُرَكَّبمُعَقَّدعُقْدَهمُجَمَّع مبانٍ، مُنْشَأَهمُرَكَّب
komplexsložitýkomplexnísloženýcelek
komplekskompliceretsammensatvanskelig
kompleks
monimutkainen-keskuskompleksi
komplekssložen
kombinátkomplex
geîhnútur, duldmargbrotinn, flókinnsamstæîa
複合の複合体
복잡한복합체
kompleksassudėtingassudėtingas dalykassudėtingumassudėtinis
kompleksskomplicētssaliktssarežģīts
complex
komplex
komplekszapleten
komplexkomplicerad
คอมเพล็กซ์ซับซ้อน
karmaşıkkomplekssitetesisleranlaşılması güç
phức tạptòa phức hợp

complex

[ˈkɒmpleks]
A. ADJ (= difficult) → complejo, complicado; (= consisting of different parts) → complejo (Ling) → compuesto
B. N
1. (Psych) → complejo m
inferiority/Oedipus complexcomplejo m de inferioridad/Edipo
he's got a complex about his noseestá acomplejado por su nariz, su nariz lo acompleja
2. [of buildings] → complejo m
sports complexcomplejo m deportivo
housing complexcolonia f de viviendas, urbanización f
shopping complexcomplejo m comercial

complex

[ˈkɒmplɛks]
adj (= complicated) → complexe
n (PSYCHOLOGY, PSYCHIATRY)complexe m
a guilt complex → un complexe de culpabilité
[buildings] → complexe m
a sports complex → un complexe sportif

complex

adj
komplex; person, mind, issue, question, problem, poem alsovielschichtig; theory, task, system also, machine, patterndifferenziert, kompliziert; situation also, paragraphverwickelt, kompliziert
(Gram) a complex sentenceein Satzgefüge nt
n
Komplex m; industrial complexIndustriekomplex m
(Psych) → Komplex m; he has a complex about his earser hat Komplexe or einen Komplex wegen seiner Ohren; don’t get a complex about itdeswegen brauchst du keine Komplexe zu bekommen

complex

[ˈkɒmplɛks]
1. adj (all senses) → complesso/a
2. n
a. (Psych) → complesso
he's got a complex about his weight → ha il complesso del peso, è complessato per il peso
b. (of buildings) → complesso
sports/housing complex → complesso sportivo/edilizio

complex

(ˈkompleks) , ((American) kəmˈpleks) adjective
1. composed of many parts. a complex piece of machinery.
2. complicated or difficult. a complex problem.
(ˈkompleks) noun
1. something made up of many different pieces. The leisure complex will include a swimming-pool, tennis courts, a library etc.
2. (often used loosely) an abnormal mental state caused by experiences in one's past which affect one's behaviour. She has a complex about her weight; inferiority complex.
complexity (kəmˈpleksəti) plural comˈplexities noun
1. the quality of being complex.
2. something complex.

complex

مُرَكَّب, مُرَكَّب komplex, složitý kompleks Komplex σύμπλεγμα, σύνθετος complejo -keskus, monimutkainen complexe kompleks, složen complesso 複合の, 複合体 복잡한, 복합체 complex kompleks, sammensatt kompleks, złożony complexo комплекс, комплексный komplex, komplicerad คอมเพล็กซ์, ซับซ้อน karmaşık, kompleks phức tạp, tòa phức hợp 复杂的, 联合体

com·plex

n. complejo, serie de procesos mentales interrelacionados que afectan la conducta y la personalidad;
castration ______ de castración;
guilt ______ de culpa;
inferiority ______ de inferioridad;
Electra's ______ de Electra;
Oedipus ______ de Edipo;
a. complejo-a; complicado-a.

complex

n complejo; inferiority — complejo de inferioridad; Mycobacterium avium — (MAC) complejo Mycobacterium avium; Oedipus — complejo de Edipo; superiority — complejo de superioridad
References in classic literature ?
Nina was only six, and she was rather more complex than the other children.
What a complex riddle --a complexity of complexities--do they present
It was a good show, and as stately and complex as guard-mount and the trooping of the colors; and it had its own special music, composed for the occasion by the bandmaster of the Seventh; and the child was as serious as the most serious war-worn soldier of them all; and finally when they throned her upon the shoulder of the oldest veteran, and pronounced her "well and truly adopted," and the bands struck up and all saluted and she saluted in return, it was better and more moving than any kindred thing I have seen on the stage, because stage things are make-believe, but this was real and the players' hearts were in it.
I was informed, later, by a higher authority, that there was an "exception" which permits one to say "wegen DEN Regen" in certain peculiar and complex circumstances, but that this exception is not extended to anything BUT rain.
Socialism if the race has at last evolved the faculty of coordinating the functions of a society too crowded and complex to be worked any longer on the old haphazard private-property system.
He brought Bell to his house and showed him what Helmholtz had done--how he had kept tuning-forks in vibration by the power of electro-magnets, and blended the tones of several tuning-forks together to produce the complex quality of the human voice.
Situation, soil, climate, the nature of the productions, the nature of the government, the genius of the citizens, the degree of information they possess, the state of commerce, of arts, of industry, these circumstances and many more, too complex, minute, or adventitious to admit of a particular specification, occasion differences hardly conceivable in the relative opulence and riches of different countries.
But no language is so copious as to supply words and phrases for every complex idea, or so correct as not to include many equivocally denoting different ideas.
Yet for the sake of the young and inexperienced, who may perchance infer -- from the two simple instances I have given above, of the manner in which I should recognize my Father and my Sons -- that Recognition by sight is an easy affair, it may be needful to point out that in actual life most of the problems of Sight Recognition are far more subtle and complex.
A terrible noise filled the air, a complex noise, made up of the howls of the crushed waves, the roaring of the wind, and the claps of thunder.
Yet they're odd; complex, like everything else alive.
Yet these people were clothed in pleasant fabrics that must at times need renewal, and their sandals, though undecorated, were fairly complex specimens of metalwork.