complex conjugate

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complex conjugate

n.
Either one of a pair of complex numbers whose real parts are identical and whose imaginary parts differ only in sign; for example, 6 + 4i and 6 - 4i are complex conjugates.

complex conjugate

n
(Mathematics) maths the complex number whose imaginary part is the negative of that of a given complex number, the real parts of both numbers being equal: a ib is the complex conjugate of a +ib.
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Noun1.complex conjugate - either of two complex numbers whose real parts are identical and whose imaginary parts differ only in sign
complex number, complex quantity, imaginary, imaginary number - (mathematics) a number of the form a+bi where a and b are real numbers and i is the square root of -1
References in periodicals archive ?
The triangle is isosceles because one root is always on the horizontal (real) axis and the other two roots, being complex conjugates, appear symmetrically behind and in front of the real axis.
Here we demonstrated the separation of minor actinides using complex conjugates of MNPs with diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) chelator.
Then, the reflection (R) and transmission (T) coefficients from the structure become the complex conjugates of their counterparts.
This method involves designing drugs for the target protein by analyzing and comparing the structure of various compounds and complex conjugates in order to develop an overall understanding of the mechanism by which protein activity is inhibited (or activated).
Because the inner products cancel when complex conjugates are multiplied
50), then d, and y (they are the complex conjugates of d, y) are solutions to Eqs.
1) [Mathematical Expression Omitted] (2) [Mathematical Expression Omitted] where <> = the time average * = the complex conjugate N is a Hermitian matrix, that is, its nondiagonal elements are complex conjugates of each other, which will be true of all power correlation matrices.
To solve the quintic equation there are now only two more roots to identify; these--we know in advance--are complex conjugates of each other, as the coefficients of the original equation are all real, and we are well on our way to finding all five roots of the polynomial equation.