complexify


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complexify

(kəmˈplɛksɪˌfaɪ)
vb, -fies, -fying or -fied
to make or become complex
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.complexify - have or develop complicating consequences; "These actions will ramify"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
2.complexify - make complex; "he unnecessarily complexified every problem"
complicate, perplex - make more complicated; "There was a new development that complicated the matter"
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The element that would typically complexify a traditional inter vivos trust is the inclusion of future interests, which carry trusts out of the sphere of spot transfers and into the sphere that we shall call anticipatory transfers--an area demanding greater formality for additional reasons, as we shall presently see.
A simple way to construct such a group is to take a finite real reflection group (or, equivalently, a finite Coxeter group together with its natural geometric realization) and to complexify it.
The unconscious connection between mother and daughter reveals an intellectual complexify that women, black and white, have felt compelled to repress.
This might be called the vertical dimension (or "higher truth"), but there is also a horizontal one ("relative truth"), which reveals that forms complexify over time.
No matter how badly somebody acts, I try to put some qualities in them that are good, something to complexify the character for the reader.
By the same token, literary studies ought to aspire not merely to exemplify but also to complexify research in other disciplines.
Scholarship continues to complexify our understanding of these relationships, but it is at least clear that gay identities in Mexican immigrants do not coincide with our general understanding of these identities in the United States.
I am therefore not interested in the relations that may or may not exist between the "(pre)-basic variety" of the following section, Bickerton's "protolanguage", or indeed Givon's (1979) "pragmatic mode" (see Klein and Perdue 1997; Jackendoff 1999 for a discussion), (4) but merely in the methodological necessity of analyzing restricted linguistic systems (Botha 2004) in order to understand how, and why, they complexify.
VERGNE: Perhaps confuse isn't the right word, but rather complexify.
The University can, by bringing the Church's past to bear in these and other ways, help to sensitize and complexify the Church's present, calling it to an acknowledgement and understanding of what it has been in such a way as to open up possibilities for what it can become.
In War and Peace, Tolstoy asks why it could not be that if we looked behind the mass of contingent historical events, things would not simplify, but complexify.
Another possibility is to complexify the C-space polyvector valued coordinates Z = [Z.