complexion

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com·plex·ion

 (kəm-plĕk′shən)
n.
1. The natural color, texture, and appearance of the skin, especially of the face.
2. General character, aspect, or appearance: findings that will alter the complexion of the problem.
3. A viewpoint, inclination, or attitude: a conservative political complexion.
4. The combination of the four humors of cold, heat, moistness, and dryness in specific proportions, thought in ancient and medieval physiology to control the temperament and the constitution of the body.

[Middle English complexioun, physical constitution, from Old French complexion, from Late Latin complexiō, complexiōn-, balance of the humors, from Latin, combination, from complexus, past participle of complectī, to entwine; see complect.]

com·plex′ion·al adj.

complexion

(kəmˈplɛkʃən)
n
1. the colour and general appearance of a person's skin, esp of the face
2. aspect, character, or nature: the general complexion of a nation's finances.
3. obsolete
a. the temperament of a person
b. the temperature and general appearance of the body
[C14: from medical Latin complexiō one's bodily characteristics, from Latin: a combination, from complectī to embrace; see complex]
comˈplexional adj

com•plex•ion

(kəmˈplɛk ʃən)

n.
1. the natural color, texture, and appearance of the skin, esp. of the face.
2. appearance; aspect; character: This testimony put a different complexion on things.
3. viewpoint, attitude, or conviction: one's political complexion.
4. (in medieval physiology) the constitution or nature of body and mind, regarded as the result of certain combined qualities.
[1300–50; Middle English < Medieval Latin complexiō constitution, temperament, Latin: combination, group, literally, the act of embracing. See complex, -tion]
com•plex′ion•al, adj.

Complexion

See also skin.

absence of pigmentation in the skin.
greensickness; a disease of girls in puberty, characterized by, among other symptoms, greenishness of the complexion.
a redness of beard and hair and ruddiness of complexion. — erythristic, erythrismal, adj.
a mania for blushing.
paleness of color as a result of illness or exclusion from light. See also plants.
the condition of being florid or highly colored, especially reddish, used especially of the complexion. — florid, adj.
chlorosis.
jaundice.
a disease of the liver, characterized by, among other symptoms, yellowness of the skin. Also called icterus.
darkness or blackness of eyes, hair, or complexion.
1. the state, condition, quality, or process of becoming or being red.
2. a blush.
3. the act of blushing. — rubescent, adj.
reddishness or ruddiness, especially of the complexion. — rubicund, adj.
a chronic condition of dilatation of the capillaries and other blood vessels, as seen in the reddish faces of heavy drinkers and people whose faces are continually exposed to cold climates. — telangiectic, adj.
a person with light-colored hair and fair complexion. — xanthochroid, xanthochroous, adj.

Complexion

 

See Also: SKIN, WRINKLES

  1. A blotchy complexion like salami —Jilly Cooper
  2. The cluster of red veins, like Rorschach patterns, sticking out on his cheeks —Henry Van Dyke
  3. Complexion … as red as a boiled shrimp —Kenzaburo Oë
  4. Complexion … as smooth as white mushrooms —Bobbie Ann Mason
  5. Complexion dark as cholera —Cynthia Ozick
  6. Complexion like a choir boy’s —Robert Campbell
  7. A complexion like the blossoms of apples —W. B. Yeats
  8. A complexion like the moon at short range —Harry Prince
  9. Complexion … like the skin on porridge —Frank Swinnerton
  10. Complexion like twelve-year-old Scotch going down —Loren D. Estleman
  11. Complexion the color of porridge —Christopher Isherwood
  12. Complexion, which had become pale in the dimness of the house … shone as if it had been varnished —Guy de Maupassant
  13. Face glistened as if it were covered with scar tissue from a newly healed burn —Kenzaburo Oë
  14. Face … pock-marked like a wall against which men had stood to take the bullets of a firing squad —Penelope Gilliatt
  15. Her complexion in its pallor showed clear as a lily petal —Ethel Cook Eliot
  16. His face had an unnatural smoothness as though it were massaged and nourished with cold creams —W. Somerset Maugham
  17. Suntan that looks like it was done on a rotisserie —Tom Wolfe Wolfe is describing actor Cary Grant.
  18. The thin veins on his massive cheeks were like the engraving on giltedged securities —Ludwig Bemelmans
  19. A tracery of red veins, distinct as mapped rivers and tributaries, showed on his cheeks —Anne Tyler
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.complexion - the coloring of a person's facecomplexion - the coloring of a person's face  
color, coloring, colouring, colour - a visual attribute of things that results from the light they emit or transmit or reflect; "a white color is made up of many different wavelengths of light"
blondness, paleness, fairness - the property of having a naturally light complexion
ruddiness, rosiness - a healthy reddish complexion
achromasia, lividness, paleness, pallidness, pallor, wanness, luridness, lividity - unnatural lack of color in the skin (as from bruising or sickness or emotional distress)
sallowness - a sickly yellowish skin color
tawniness - the quality or state of being the color of tanned leather; "the tawniness of his complexion"
swarthiness, duskiness, darkness - a swarthy complexion
whiteness - lightness or fairness of complexion; "only the whiteness of her cheeks gave any indication of the stress from which she was suffering"
2.complexion - a combination that results from coupling or interlinking; "diphthongs are complexions of vowels"
combination - a collection of things that have been combined; an assemblage of separate parts or qualities
3.complexion - a point of view or general attitude or inclination; "he altered the complexion of his times"; "a liberal political complexion"
point of view, standpoint, viewpoint, stand - a mental position from which things are viewed; "we should consider this problem from the viewpoint of the Russians"; "teaching history gave him a special point of view toward current events"
4.complexion - texture and appearance of the skin of the face
appearance, visual aspect - outward or visible aspect of a person or thing
5.complexion - (obsolete) a combination of elements (of dryness and warmth or of the four humors) that was once believed to determine a person's health and temperament
nature - the complex of emotional and intellectual attributes that determine a person's characteristic actions and reactions; "it is his nature to help others"
archaicism, archaism - the use of an archaic expression
Verb1.complexion - give a certain color to; "The setting sun complexioned the hills"
tinct, tint, tinge, touch - color lightly; "her greying hair was tinged blond"; "the leaves were tinged red in November"

complexion

noun
1. skin, colour, colouring, hue, skin tone, pigmentation She had short brown hair and a pale complexion.
2. nature, character, make-up, cast, stamp, disposition The political complexion of the government has changed.
3. perspective, look, light, appearance, aspect, angle, slant This latest development puts a different complexion on things.

complexion

noun
1. Skin tone, especially of the face:
2. The combination of emotional, intellectual, and moral qualities that distinguishes an individual:
3. A person's customary manner of emotional response:
Translations
بَشَرَةلَوْن البَشَرَه
barva pletipleťpokožka
teinthudfarve
ihonväri
put
arcszín
litarháttur, hörundslitur
顔色
안색
sejas krāsa
hy
ผิว
derinin doğal rengiten
nước da

complexion

[kəmˈplekʃən] Ntez f, cutis m; (in terms of colour) → tez f, piel f (fig) → cariz m, aspecto m
that puts a different complexion on iteso le da otro cariz or aspecto

complexion

[kəmˈplɛkʃən] n
[face] → teint m
(= nature) [event] → aspect m, caractère m

complexion

n
Teint m; (= skin colour)Gesichtsfarbe f
(fig: = aspect) → Anstrich m, → Aspekt m; to put a new/different etc complexion on somethingetw in einem neuen/anderen etc Licht erscheinen lassen; of a different political/religious complexionmit anderen politischen/religiösen Anschauungen

complexion

[kəmˈplɛkʃn] n (of face) → carnagione f (fig) (aspect, appearance) → aspetto
that puts a different complexion on it (fig) → ciò fa apparire la cosa sotto tutta un'altra luce or tutto un altro aspetto

complexion

(kəmˈplekʃən) noun
the colour or appearance of the skin especially of the face. a beautiful complexion.

complexion

بَشَرَة barva pleti teint Teint απόχρωση επιδερμίδας tez ihonväri teint put carnagione 顔色 안색 huidskleur ansiktsfarge cera cor da pele, tez цвет лица hy ผิว ten nước da 面色

com·plex·ion

n. cutis, complexión, tez.

complexion

n cutis m, tez f
References in classic literature ?
Not so easy, however, is it to assign an adequate cause for the endless variety of complexions to be seen in the Typee Valley.
I could have given my own sect the preference and made everybody a Presby- terian without any trouble, but that would have been to affront a law of human nature: spiritual wants and instincts are as various in the human family as are physical appetites, complexions, and features, and a man is only at his best, morally, when he is equipped with the religious garment whose color and shape and size most nicely accommodate themselves to the spirit- ual complexion, angularities, and stature of the indi- vidual who wears it; and, besides, I was afraid of a united Church; it makes a mighty power, the mightiest conceivable, and then when it by and by gets into selfish hands, as it is always bound to do, it means death to human liberty and paralysis to human thought.
The startling contrast between the corpse-like pallor of her complexion and the overpowering life and light, the glittering metallic brightness in her large black eyes, held him literally spell-bound.
But we assert that she died of an overdose of arsenic, ignorantly taken, in the privacy of her own room, as a remedy for the defects--the proved and admitted defects--of her complexion.
Where features were indifferent, a fine complexion gave beauty to them all; and where they were good, the effect wasfortunately he need not attempt to describe what the effect was.
The servant caught a severe cold, but he never changed his color or complexion.
While she spoke, an involuntary glance showed her Darcy, with a heightened complexion, earnestly looking at her, and his sister overcome with confusion, and unable to lift up her eyes.
And off I started, cursorily glancing sideways as I passed the toilet-table, surmounted by a looking-glass: a thin irregular face I saw, with sunk, dark eyes under a large, square forehead, complexion destitute of bloom or attraction; something young, but not youthful, no object to win a lady's love, no butt for the shafts of Cupid.
The youngest of the two was short, and of fair complexion.
So dark in the complexion that we all set him down in the office for an Indian, or something of that sort.
She was a pretty woman, of a striking modern type, tall, well-proportioned, strong, I should say, with a good complexion that had evidently been made just a little better.
Sometimes I have not been successful in my purpose, sometimes I have, supporting it upon the shoulders of the truth; which truth is so clear that I can almost say I have with my own eyes seen Amadis of Gaul, who was a man of lofty stature, fair complexion, with a handsome though black beard, of a countenance between gentle and stern in expression, sparing of words, slow to anger, and quick to put it away from him; and as I have depicted Amadis, so I could, I think, portray and describe all the knights-errant that are in all the histories in the world; for by the perception I have that they were what their histories describe, and by the deeds they did and the dispositions they displayed, it is possible, with the aid of sound philosophy, to deduce their features, complexion, and stature.