complexity


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com·plex·i·ty

 (kəm-plĕk′sĭ-tē)
n. pl. com·plex·i·ties
1. The quality or condition of being complex.
2. One of the components of something complex: a maze of bureaucratic and legalistic complexities.

complexity

(kəmˈplɛksɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the state or quality of being intricate or complex
2. something intricate or complex; complication

com•plex•i•ty

(kəmˈplɛk sɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the state or quality of being complex; intricacy: the complexity of urban life.
2. something complex: the complexities of foreign policy.
[1715–25]

Complexity

 

See Also: DIFFICULTY

  1. (He was) as complex as the double helix and sometimes as simple as a Paramecium —Mike Sommer
  2. As complicated and unavailing as a cut-out paper snowflake —Eudora Welty
  3. As complicated as a full-bore, rollicking infidelity right in their own homes —Richard Ford
  4. As complicated as the flush valve on a water closet —Anon
  5. [A family’s history] convoluted as a Greek drama —Gail Godwin
  6. (Character is as) detailed, as intricately woven as the intricate Oriental carpets and brocades in Freud’s office —Vincent Canby, New York Times, September 24, 1986

    The Oriental carpet and brocade comparison was particularly apt for Canby’s review of Nineteen-Nineteen, a movie about two Freud patients, with many scenes in Freud’s heavily carpeted Vienna office.

  7. The detail was astonishing, like the circuits on a computer chip —James Morrow
  8. (By marriage she had to assume a whole new family of blood kin) elaborate as a graph —George Garrett
  9. (Their relationship seemed as) intricate as a DNA blueprint —Joseph Wambaugh
  10. To say Freud was complex is like saying Tolstoy could write —Anon
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.complexity - the quality of being intricate and compounded; "he enjoyed the complexity of modern computers"
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
elaborateness, intricacy, involution, elaboration - marked by elaborately complex detail
tapestry - something that resembles a tapestry in its complex pictorial designs; "the tapestry of European history"
trickiness - the quality of requiring skill or caution; "these puzzles are famous for their trickiness"
simplicity, simpleness - the quality of being simple or uncompounded; "the simplicity of a crystal"

complexity

noun complication, involvement, intricacy, entanglement, convolution a diplomatic problem of great complexity

complexity

noun
Something complex:
Translations
تعقيدتَعْقيدشَيء مُعَقَّد
complexitat
složitostkomplexnost
indviklethedkompleksitetkompleks tilstandindviklet tilstand
keerukuskeerulisus
hankaluusmonimutkaisuusmutkikkuusongelmavaikeus
מורכבות
bonyodalombonyolultságkomplikációösszetett volta
flókiî málmargbrotiî eîli
複雑さ
painumassudėtingumas
komplicētībasarežģītība
zawiłośćzłożoność
complexitate
zapletenostzložitosť
zapletenost
komplikationkrånglighet
karmaşıklıkkarmaşıkkarmaşık şey

complexity

[kəmˈpleksɪtɪ] Ncomplejidad f, lo complejo

complexity

[kəmˈplɛksɪti]
n (= difficult nature) [problem] → complexité f
complexities npl (= problems) [life] → complications f
legal complexities → complexités fpl juridiques

complexity

nKomplexität f; (of person, mind, issue, question, problem, poem also)Vielschichtigkeit f; (of theory, task, system also, machine, pattern)Differenziertheit f, → Kompliziertheit f

complexity

[kəmˈplɛksɪtɪ] ncomplessità f inv

complex

(ˈkompleks) , ((American) kəmˈpleks) adjective
1. composed of many parts. a complex piece of machinery.
2. complicated or difficult. a complex problem.
(ˈkompleks) noun
1. something made up of many different pieces. The leisure complex will include a swimming-pool, tennis courts, a library etc.
2. (often used loosely) an abnormal mental state caused by experiences in one's past which affect one's behaviour. She has a complex about her weight; inferiority complex.
complexity (kəmˈpleksəti) plural comˈplexities noun
1. the quality of being complex.
2. something complex.
References in classic literature ?
Besides the obscurity arising from the complexity of objects, and the imperfection of the human faculties, the medium through which the conceptions of men are conveyed to each other adds a fresh embarrassment.
But later too, and the next day and the third day, she still found no words in which she could express the complexity of her feelings; indeed, she could not even find thoughts in which she could clearly think out all that was in her soul.
He was a famous poet in his day, and the world recognised his genius with a unanimity which the greater complexity of modern life has rendered infrequent.
And without considering the multiplicity and complexity of the conditions any one of which taken separately may seem to be the cause, he snatches at the first approximation to a cause that seems to him intelligible and says: "This is the cause
To some minds it will not appear a trivial objection, that it could tend to increase the complexity of the political machine, and to add a new spring to the government, the utility of which would at best be questionable.
What a complex riddle --a complexity of complexities--do they present
Let him betray his friend's confidence, and he will adore that same cunning complexity called Chance, which gives him the hope that his friend will never know.
Alfred Ainger has done such good service, the great and peculiar change which was begun at the end of the last century, and dominates our own; that sudden increase of the width, the depth, the complexity of intellectual interest, which has many times torn and distorted literary style, even with those best able to comprehend its laws.
Nor could I consider the magnitude and complexity of my plan as any argument of its impracticability.
Language sometimes conceals the complexity of a belief.
They had more rites, more ceremonies, more complexity in their sensations, more knowledge of evil, more varied meanings to the subtle phrases of their language.
Whatever happened to him now would be one more motive to add to the complexity of the pattern, and when the end approached he would rejoice in its completion.