complication


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com·pli·ca·tion

 (kŏm′plĭ-kā′shən)
n.
1. The act of complicating.
2. A confused or intricate relationship of parts.
3. A factor, condition, or element that complicates.
4. Medicine A secondary disease, an accident, or a negative reaction occurring during the course of an illness and usually aggravating the illness.

complication

(ˌkɒmplɪˈkeɪʃən)
n
1. a condition, event, etc, that is complex or confused
2. the act or process of complicating
3. a situation, event, or condition that complicates or frustrates: her coming was a serious complication.
4. (Pathology) a disease or disorder arising as a consequence of another disease

com•pli•ca•tion

(ˌkɒm plɪˈkeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of complicating.
2. a complicated or involved state or condition.
3. a complex combination of elements or things.
4. something that introduces, usu. unexpectedly, a difficulty, problem, change, etc.
5. a concurrent disease, accident, or adverse reaction that aggravates the original disease.
[1605–15; < Late Latin]
com′pli•ca`tive, adj.

Complication

 

can of worms A situation or specific problem which threatens to cause trouble and have unresolvable complications for all concerned; a sore spot; a sensitive topic better left unexplored. A can of worms might pass for an acceptable product before it is opened. However, to open a can of worms means to instigate trouble, to broach a subject or do something questionable which has uncontrollable, complex, and negative repercussions.

Pandora’s box A source of afflictions and complications which plague one without warning; a loaded situation; something which appears in a positive light but is negative in effect. In Greek mythology, Pandora, the first woman, was showered with gifts from the gods, among them a magnificent box presented her by Zeus which she was told never to open. Disobeying the gods, she opened it, and unwittingly allowed all of the human ills contained within to escape. Only Hope remained. The term appeared as early as the mid-16th century.

I cannot liken our affection better than … to Pandora’s box, lift up the lid, out flies the Devil; shut it up fast, it cannot hurt us. (Stephen Gosson, The School of Abuse, 1579)

red tape Excessive formality and petty routine, preventing expeditious disposal of important matters. The term derives from the literal red tape with which official and legal documents were formerly bound and sealed. Though its use has proliferated along with the proliferation of bureaucracy and departmentalization, its current figurative meaning is by no means recent:

All the morning at the customhouse, plagued with red tape. (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Life, 1869)

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.complication - the act or process of complicating
interference, hinderance, hindrance - the act of hindering or obstructing or impeding
2.complication - a situation or condition that is complex or confused; "her coming was a serious complication"
situation, state of affairs - the general state of things; the combination of circumstances at a given time; "the present international situation is dangerous"; "wondered how such a state of affairs had come about"; "eternal truths will be neither true nor eternal unless they have fresh meaning for every new social situation"- Franklin D.Roosevelt
3.complication - any disease or disorder that occurs during the course of (or because of) another disease; "bed sores are a common complication in cases of paralysis"
disease - an impairment of health or a condition of abnormal functioning
4.complication - a development that complicates a situation; "the court's decision had many unforeseen ramifications"
development - a recent event that has some relevance for the present situation; "recent developments in Iraq"; "what a revolting development!"
5.complication - puzzling complexity
complexity, complexness - the quality of being intricate and compounded; "he enjoyed the complexity of modern computers"

complication

noun
1. problem, difficulty, obstacle, drawback, snag, uphill (S. African), stumbling block, aggravation The age difference was a complication to the relationship.
2. complexity, combination, mixture, web, confusion, intricacy, entanglement His poetry was characterised by a complication of imagery and ideas.

complication

noun
Something complex:
Translations
تَعْقِيدتَعْقيد، شَيءٌ مُعَقَّدتَعْقيدات، صُعوبات
komplikace
komplikationindviklethed
hankaluus
komplikacija
szövõdmény
aukakvilli
複雑な要因
골칫거리
komplikácia
težavazaplet
komplikation
การทำให้ยุ่งยาก
sự phức tạp

complication

[ˌkɒmplɪˈkeɪʃən] Ncomplicación f
it seems there are complicationsparece que han surgido complicaciones or dificultades

complication

[ˌkɒmplɪˈkeɪʃən] n
(= problem) (gen)complication f
(medical)complication f

complication

nKomplikation f; (= complicated nature)Kompliziertheit f

complication

[ˌkɒmplɪˈkeɪʃn] ncomplicazione f

complicate

(ˈkomplikeit) verb
to make difficult. His illness will complicate matters.
ˈcomplicated adjective
(negative uncomplicated) difficult to understand. complicated instructions.
ˌcompliˈcation noun
1. something making a situation etc more difficult. Taking the dog with us on holiday will be an added complication.
2. a development (in an illness etc) which makes things worse.

complication

تَعْقِيد komplikace komplikation Komplikation περιπλοκή complicación hankaluus complication komplikacija complicazione 複雑な要因 골칫거리 complicatie forvikling powikłanie complicação затруднение komplikation การทำให้ยุ่งยาก zorluk sự phức tạp 复杂化

com·pli·ca·tion

n. complicación.

complication

n complicación f
References in classic literature ?
Tom gave no sign that there was any complication in his affair with Mary Nestor, and of course Ned did not tell anything of what he knew about it.
The social complication that threatened her now seemed to her rather the outcome of her half-civilized parlor than of the sylvan glade.
After long reflection he resolved at last to go to his friend's village, where he had been staying when he afforded opportunities for the contrivance of this complication of misfortune.
I have unfolded to you a complication of dangers to which you would be exposed, should you permit that sacred knot which binds the people of America together be severed or dissolved by ambition or by avarice, by jealousy or by misrepresentation.
It was marvellous, a feast for the eyes, this complication of coloured tints, a perfect kaleidoscope of green, yellow, orange, violet, indigo, and blue; in one word, the whole palette of an enthusiastic colourist
It is therefore evident that the unravelling of the plot, no less than the complication, must arise out of the plot itself, it must not be brought about by the 'Deus ex Machina'--as in the Medea, or in the Return of the Greeks in the Iliad.
On the 10th of June, the party was a little to the east of the Wind River Mountains, where they halted for a time in excellent pasturage, to give their horses a chance to recruit their strength for a long journey; for it was Captain Bonneville's intention to shape his course to the settlements; having already been detained by the complication of his duties, and by various losses and impediments, far beyond the time specified in his leave of absence.
It could be heard and cause some beastly complication.
But the end to which both will arrive at last will be the same: the one are fast destroying themselves by sensual indulgences, and the other are fast being destroyed by a complication of disorders, and the want of wholesome food.
It was too horrible a confusion of guilt, too gross a complication of evil, for human nature, not in a state of utter barbarism, to be capable of
I was perpetually exasperated with the petty promptings of his conceit and his love of patronage, with his self-complacent belief in Bertha Grant's passion for him, with his half-pitying contempt for me--seen not in the ordinary indications of intonation and phrase and slight action, which an acute and suspicious mind is on the watch for, but in all their naked skinless complication.
It was transient: cleared away in an instant; but Anne could imagine she read there the consciousness of having, by some complication of mutual trick, or some overbearing authority of his, been obliged to attend(perhaps for half an hour) to his lectures and restrictions on her designs on Sir Walter.