compotier

compotier

(kɔ̃mpɔtje)
n
(Cookery) a dish for holding compote
References in periodicals archive ?
Though she is not depicted in Nature morte au compotier (Fig.
Top ten most expensive paintings 1 Garcon a la Pipe Picasso pounds 70m 2 Portrait of Dr Gachet Van Gogh pounds 55m 3 Bal du Moulin de la Galette Rodin pounds 52m 4 Massacre of the Innocents Rubens pounds 50m 5 Portrait de l'artiste sans barbe Van Gogh pounds 44m 6 Rideau, Cruchon et Compotier Cezanne pounds 37m 7 Les Noces de Pierrette Picasso pounds 34m 8 Femme aux Bras Croises Picasso pounds 33m 9 Irises Van Gogh pounds 31m 10 Le Reve Picasso pounds 30m
Cezanne's Nature Morte au Compotier is a still life featuring a fruit dish--a compotier--with a circular lip.
The notorious lip of the compotier would have been a case in point.
The critical response to Cezanne's 1895 exhibition is an object lesson in the optics of art appreciation: the marked eccentricities, epitomized by the lip of the compotier, were seen as evidence of Cezanne's Provencal authenticity.
Nothing in Cezanne's culture explains the lip of the compotier, or the brush strokes, or the astonishing space, or the way forms tilt toward the viewer.
In the latter category I would single out Compotier, Pitcher, and Fruit (Nature morte), a picture remarkable in its absolute resolution and grandeur which stands amongst the most joyous and sumptuous of his career.
The top of each dish was to have a different shape--round, oval or quatrefoil--and it is from these shapes that they derive their names; Compotier de Forme Ovale (Fig.
For example, the drawing for the base of the Compotier en Forme de Trefle shows lines running down its length.
The face on the Compotier de Forme Ronde, enclosed within a distorted circle, is formed from a great, raised, sweeping line standing for the nose, the cheeks and eyebrows.
Picasso staggered ftom style to style, but in a way Braque never stopped being a Cubist: And perhaps the Cubist painting became its own prototype for an artist whose life was spent increasingly in his own studio, where nothing was more familiar -not the rickety table, the guitar or the compotier -than their representations in Cubist works.
Still life, bouquet, and compotier by Henri Matisse (1869-1954), 1924.