compounded


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com·pound 1

 (kŏm-pound′, kəm-, kŏm′pound′)
v. com·pound·ed, com·pound·ing, com·pounds
v.tr.
1. To combine so as to form a whole; mix: Tin was often compounded with lead to make pewter.
2. To produce or create by combining two or more ingredients or parts; compose or make up: pharmacists compounding prescriptions.
3. To settle (a debt, for example) by agreeing on an amount less than the claim; adjust.
4. To compute (interest) on the principal and accrued interest.
5.
a. To add to or intensify so as to make worse: "The university authorities ... compounded their crime in dismissing [the professor] by denying that their action ... reflected any abridgment of academic freedom" (John Kenneth Galbraith).
b. To make worse by being an additional or intensifying factor: High winds compounded the difficulties of the firefighters.
v.intr.
1. To combine in or form a compound.
2. To come to terms; agree.
adj. (kŏm′pound′, kŏm-pound′, kəm-)
1. Consisting of two or more substances, ingredients, elements, or parts.
2. Botany Composed of more than one part: a compound pistil.
n. (kŏm′pound′)
1. A combination of two or more elements or parts.
2. Linguistics A word that consists either of two or more elements that are independent words, such as loudspeaker, self-portrait, or high school, or of specially modified combining forms of words, such as Greek philosophia, from philo-, "loving," and sophia, "wisdom."
3. Chemistry A pure, macroscopically homogeneous substance consisting of atoms or ions of two or more different elements in definite proportions that cannot be separated by physical means. A compound usually has properties unlike those of its constituent elements.

[Alteration of Middle English compounen, from Old French componre, compondre, to put together, from Latin compōnere; see component.]

com·pound′a·ble adj.
com·pound′er n.

com·pound 2

 (kŏm′pound′)
n.
1. A building or buildings, especially a residence or group of residences, set off and enclosed by a barrier.
2. An enclosed area used for confining prisoners of war.

[Alteration of Malay kampong, village.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.compounded - combined into or constituting a chemical compound
combined - made or joined or united into one
References in classic literature ?
As, in an inquiry into every other subject, it is necessary to separate the different parts of which it is compounded, till we arrive at their first elements, which are the most minute parts thereof; so by the same proceeding we shall acquire a knowledge of the primary parts of a city and see wherein they differ from each other, and whether the rules of art will give us any assistance in examining into each of these things which are mentioned.
Karnegie sent them up, and then compounded a certain mixture of eggs and hot wine.
Fifthly, I would do away with those great long compounded words; or require the speaker to deliver them in sections, with intermissions for refreshments.
I had long since prepared my tincture; I purchased at once, from a firm of wholesale chemists, a large quantity of a particular salt which I knew, from my experiments, to be the last ingredient required; and late one accursed night, I compounded the elements, watched them boil and smoke together in the glass, and when the ebullition had subsided, with a strong glow of courage, drank off the potion.
But time began at last to obliterate the freshness of my alarm; the praises of conscience began to grow into a thing of course; I began to be tortured with throes and longings, as of Hyde struggling after freedom; and at last, in an hour of moral weakness, I once again compounded and swallowed the transforming draught.
Hyde had a song upon his lips as he compounded the draught, and as he drank it, pledged the dead man.
Reitinger, "The blooming of sulfur and other ingredients form compounded stocks," Rubber Chemistry and Technology, vol.
Distributes prime, virgin, repelletized, reground, and compounded commodity and engineering resins including, PE, PP, PS, PVC, ABS, PC, PC/ABS, nylon, acetal, PBT, TPO, TPU, PES, and PEEK.
In fact, securities analysts review a company's compounded growth rate of earnings for five years to determine a company's profitability.