compound

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Related to compounds: Organic compounds, Chemical compounds

com·pound 1

 (kŏm-pound′, kəm-, kŏm′pound′)
v. com·pound·ed, com·pound·ing, com·pounds
v.tr.
1. To combine so as to form a whole; mix: Tin was often compounded with lead to make pewter.
2. To produce or create by combining two or more ingredients or parts; compose or make up: pharmacists compounding prescriptions.
3. To settle (a debt, for example) by agreeing on an amount less than the claim; adjust.
4. To compute (interest) on the principal and accrued interest.
5.
a. To add to or intensify so as to make worse: "The university authorities ... compounded their crime in dismissing [the professor] by denying that their action ... reflected any abridgment of academic freedom" (John Kenneth Galbraith).
b. To make worse by being an additional or intensifying factor: High winds compounded the difficulties of the firefighters.
v.intr.
1. To combine in or form a compound.
2. To come to terms; agree.
adj. (kŏm′pound′, kŏm-pound′, kəm-)
1. Consisting of two or more substances, ingredients, elements, or parts.
2. Botany Composed of more than one part: a compound pistil.
n. (kŏm′pound′)
1. A combination of two or more elements or parts.
2. Linguistics A word that consists either of two or more elements that are independent words, such as loudspeaker, self-portrait, or high school, or of specially modified combining forms of words, such as Greek philosophia, from philo-, "loving," and sophia, "wisdom."
3. Chemistry A pure, macroscopically homogeneous substance consisting of atoms or ions of two or more different elements in definite proportions that cannot be separated by physical means. A compound usually has properties unlike those of its constituent elements.

[Alteration of Middle English compounen, from Old French componre, compondre, to put together, from Latin compōnere; see component.]

com·pound′a·ble adj.
com·pound′er n.

com·pound 2

 (kŏm′pound′)
n.
1. A building or buildings, especially a residence or group of residences, set off and enclosed by a barrier.
2. An enclosed area used for confining prisoners of war.

[Alteration of Malay kampong, village.]

compound

n
1. (Chemistry) a substance that contains atoms of two or more chemical elements held together by chemical bonds
2. any combination of two or more parts, aspects, etc
3. (Linguistics) a word formed from two existing words or combining forms
vb (mainly tr)
4. to mix or combine so as to create a compound or other product
5. to make by combining parts, elements, aspects, etc: to compound a new plastic.
6. to intensify by an added element: his anxiety was compounded by her crying.
7. (Banking & Finance) finance to calculate or pay (interest) on both the principal and its accrued interest
8. (also intr) to come to an agreement in (a quarrel, dispute, etc)
9. (Banking & Finance) (also intr) to settle (a debt, promise, etc) for less than what is owed; compromise
10. (Law) law to agree not to prosecute in return for a consideration: to compound a crime.
11. (Electrical Engineering) electrical engineering to place duplex windings on the field coil of (a motor or generator), one acting as a shunt, the other being in series with the main circuit, thus making the machine self-regulating
adj
12. composed of or created by the combination of two or more parts, elements, etc
13. (Linguistics) (of a word) consisting of elements that are also words or productive combining forms
14. (Grammar) (of a sentence) formed by coordination of two or more sentences
15. (Grammar) (of a verb or the tense, mood, etc, of a verb) formed by using an auxiliary verb in addition to the main verb: the future in English is a compound tense involving the use of such auxiliary verbs as 'shall' and 'will'.
16. (Music, other) music
a. denoting a time in which the number of beats per bar is a multiple of three: six-four is an example of compound time.
b. (of an interval) greater than an octave
17. (Zoology) zoology another word for colonial6
18. (Mechanical Engineering) (of a steam engine, turbine, etc) having multiple stages in which the steam or working fluid from one stage is used in a subsequent stage
19. (Mechanical Engineering) (of a piston engine) having a turbocharger powered by a turbine in the exhaust stream
[C14: from earlier compounen, from Old French compondre to collect, set in order, from Latin compōnere]
comˈpoundable adj
comˈpounder n

compound

(ˈkɒmpaʊnd)
n
1. (Mining & Quarrying) (esp formerly in South Africa) an enclosure, esp on the mines, containing the living quarters for Black workers
2. any similar enclosure, such as a camp for prisoners of war
3. (Historical Terms) (formerly in India, China, etc) the enclosure in which a European's house or factory stood
[C17: by folk etymology (influenced by compound1) from Malay kampong village]

com•pound1

(adj. ˈkɒm paʊnd, kɒmˈpaʊnd; n. ˈkɒm paʊnd; v. kəmˈpaʊnd, ˈkɒm paʊnd)

adj.
1. composed of two or more parts, elements, or ingredients: Soap is a compound substance.
2. having or involving two or more actions or functions: The mouth is a compound organ.
3. (of a word)
a. consisting of two or more parts that are also words, as housetop, many-sided, playact, or upon.
b. consisting of two or more parts that are also bases, as biochemistry or ethnography.
4. (of a verb tense) consisting of an auxiliary verb and a main verb, as are swimming, have spoken, or will write (opposed to simple).
5. composed of several similar parts that combine to form a whole: a compound fruit.
6. composed of a number of distinct but connected individuals, as coral.
n.
7. something formed by compounding or combining parts, elements, etc.
8. a pure substance composed of two or more elements whose chemical composition is constant.
9. a compound word, esp. one composed of two or more words that are otherwise unaltered, as moonflower or rainstorm.
v.t.
10. to put together into a whole; combine: to compound drugs to form a new medicine.
11. to make or form by combining parts, elements, etc.; construct: a medicine compounded from various drugs.
12. to increase or add to, esp. so as to worsen: a problem that was compounded by their isolation.
13. to settle or adjust by agreement, esp. for a reduced amount, as a debt.
14. to agree, for a consideration, not to prosecute or punish a wrongdoer for: to compound a crime or felony.
15. to pay (interest) on the accrued interest as well as the principal.
v.i.
16. to make a bargain; come to terms; compromise.
17. to form a compound.
[1350–1400; Middle English compounen < Middle French compon-, s. of compondre < Latin compōnere; see component]
com•pound′a•ble, adj.
com•pound′ed•ness, n.
com•pound′er, n.

com•pound2

(ˈkɒm paʊnd)

n.
a separate area, usu. fenced or walled, containing residences, business offices, barracks, or other structures.
[1670–80; alter., by association with compound1, of Malay kampung village, collection, gathering; compare kampong]

com·pound

(kŏm′pound′)
Noun
Chemistry A substance made up of two or more elements joined by chemical bonds into a molecule. The elements are combined in a definite ratio. Water, for example, is a compound having two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom in each molecule.
Adjective
Composed of more than one part, as a compound eye or leaf.

Compound

 a union; a chemical bonding of elements—Wilkes.
Example: compound of two liquids, 1710.

compound


Past participle: compounded
Gerund: compounding

Imperative
compound
compound
Present
I compound
you compound
he/she/it compounds
we compound
you compound
they compound
Preterite
I compounded
you compounded
he/she/it compounded
we compounded
you compounded
they compounded
Present Continuous
I am compounding
you are compounding
he/she/it is compounding
we are compounding
you are compounding
they are compounding
Present Perfect
I have compounded
you have compounded
he/she/it has compounded
we have compounded
you have compounded
they have compounded
Past Continuous
I was compounding
you were compounding
he/she/it was compounding
we were compounding
you were compounding
they were compounding
Past Perfect
I had compounded
you had compounded
he/she/it had compounded
we had compounded
you had compounded
they had compounded
Future
I will compound
you will compound
he/she/it will compound
we will compound
you will compound
they will compound
Future Perfect
I will have compounded
you will have compounded
he/she/it will have compounded
we will have compounded
you will have compounded
they will have compounded
Future Continuous
I will be compounding
you will be compounding
he/she/it will be compounding
we will be compounding
you will be compounding
they will be compounding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been compounding
you have been compounding
he/she/it has been compounding
we have been compounding
you have been compounding
they have been compounding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been compounding
you will have been compounding
he/she/it will have been compounding
we will have been compounding
you will have been compounding
they will have been compounding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been compounding
you had been compounding
he/she/it had been compounding
we had been compounding
you had been compounding
they had been compounding
Conditional
I would compound
you would compound
he/she/it would compound
we would compound
you would compound
they would compound
Past Conditional
I would have compounded
you would have compounded
he/she/it would have compounded
we would have compounded
you would have compounded
they would have compounded

compound

A word formed from two or more other words or word parts.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.compound - a whole formed by a union of two or more elements or parts
whole - all of something including all its component elements or parts; "Europe considered as a whole"; "the whole of American literature"
2.compound - (chemistry) a substance formed by chemical union of two or more elements or ingredients in definite proportion by weight
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
vanillin - a crystalline compound found in vanilla beans and some balsam resins; used in perfumes and flavorings
acceptor - (chemistry) in the formation of a coordinate bond it is the compound to which electrons are donated
adduct - a compound formed by an addition reaction
antiknock - any of various compounds that are added to gasoline to reduce engine knocking
acid - any of various water-soluble compounds having a sour taste and capable of turning litmus red and reacting with a base to form a salt
arsenide - a compound of arsenic with a more positive element
hydrogen cyanide - a highly poisonous gas or volatile liquid that smells like bitter almonds; becomes a gas at around 90 degree Fahrenheit and is most dangerous when inhaled; the anhydride of hydrocyanic acid; used in manufacturing
anionic compound - a compound characterized by an active anion
alkali, base - any of various water-soluble compounds capable of turning litmus blue and reacting with an acid to form a salt and water; "bases include oxides and hydroxides of metals and ammonia"
binary compound - chemical compound composed of only two elements
taurine - a colorless crystalline substance obtained from the bile of mammals
chromogen - a compound that can be converted to a pigment
manganese tetroxide - an oxide of manganese found naturally as hausmannite
monomer - a simple compound whose molecules can join together to form polymers
ozonide - any of a class of unstable chemical compounds resulting from the addition of ozone to a double bond in an unsaturated compound
organic compound - any compound of carbon and another element or a radical
ammine - a complex inorganic compound that contains ammonia molecules
anhydride - a compound formed from one or more other compounds in a reaction resulting in removal of water
azide - a chemical compound containing the azido group combined with an element or radical
bitter principle - any one of several hundred compounds having a bitter taste; not admitting of chemical classification
buffer - (chemistry) an ionic compound that resists changes in its pH
calcium-cyanamide, cyanamide - a compound used as a fertilizer and as a source of nitrogen compounds
carbonyl - a compound containing metal combined with carbon monoxide
carbon disulfide - a toxic colorless flammable liquid (CS2); used in the manufacture of rayon and cellophane and carbon tetrachloride and as a solvent for rubber
cofactor - a substance (as a coenzyme) that must join with another to produce a given result
cementite, iron carbide - a chemical compound that is a constituent of steel and cast iron; very hard and brittle
chemical, chemical substance - material produced by or used in a reaction involving changes in atoms or molecules
chloropicrin, nitrochloroform - a heavy colorless insoluble liquid compound that causes tears and vomiting; used as a pesticide and as tear gas
coordination compound, complex - a compound described in terms of the central atom to which other atoms are bound or coordinated
allomorph - any of several different crystalline forms of the same chemical compound; "calcium carbonate occurs in the allomorphs calcite and aragonite"
corrosive - a substance having the tendency to cause corrosion (such a strong acids or alkali)
aluminate - a compound of alumina and a metallic oxide
defoliant - a chemical that is sprayed on plants and causes their leaves to fall off
depilatory - a chemical (usually a sulfide) used to remove hair or wool or bristles from hides
derivative - a compound obtained from, or regarded as derived from, another compound
dimer - a compound whose molecules are composed of two identical monomers
fixing agent, fixer - a chemical compound that sets or fixes something (as a dye or a photographic image)
flavone - a colorless crystalline compound that is part of a number of white or yellow plant pigments
formulation, preparation - a substance prepared according to a formula; "the physician prescribed a commercial preparation of the medicine"
enantiomer, enantiomorph - either one of a pair of compounds (crystals or molecules) that are mirror images on each other but are not identical
exotherm - a compound that gives off heat during its formation and absorbs heat during its decomposition
goitrogen - any substance (such as thiouracil) that induces the formation of a goiter
benzofuran, coumarone, cumarone - a colorless oily compound extracted from coal tar and used in manufacturing synthetic resins
synthetic, synthetic substance - a compound made artificially by chemical reactions
3.compound - an enclosure of residences and other building (especially in the Orient)
enclosure - a structure consisting of an area that has been enclosed for some purpose
Verb1.compound - make more intense, stronger, or more marked; "The efforts were intensified", "Her rudeness intensified his dislike for her"; "Pot smokers claim it heightens their awareness"; "This event only deepened my convictions"
increase - become bigger or greater in amount; "The amount of work increased"
screw up, hot up, heat up - make more intense; "Emotions were screwed up"
fan - make (an emotion) fiercer; "fan hatred"
enhance, heighten, raise - increase; "This will enhance your enjoyment"; "heighten the tension"
amplify - increase the volume of; "amplify sound"
sharpen - make crisp or more crisp and precise; "We had to sharpen our arguments"
heighten, sharpen - make (one's senses) more acute; "This drug will sharpen your vision"
2.compound - put or add together; "combine resources"
add - make an addition (to); join or combine or unite with others; increase the quality, quantity, size or scope of; "We added two students to that dorm room"; "She added a personal note to her letter"; "Add insult to injury"; "Add some extra plates to the dinner table"
totalise, totalize - make into a total; "Can we totalize these different ideas into one philosophy?"
recombine - to combine or put together again
mix - combine (electronic signals); "mixing sounds"
synthesise, synthesize - combine so as to form a more complex, product; "his operas synthesize music and drama in perfect harmony"; "The liver synthesizes vitamins"
3.compound - calculate principal and interest
account, calculate - keep an account of
4.compound - create by mixing or combining
assemble, put together, tack together, set up, piece, tack - create by putting components or members together; "She pieced a quilt"; "He tacked together some verses"; "They set up a committee"
5.compound - combine so as to form a whole; mix; "compound the ingredients"
incorporate, integrate - make into a whole or make part of a whole; "She incorporated his suggestions into her proposal"
heterodyne - combine (a radio frequency wave) with a locally generated wave of a different frequency so as to produce a new frequency equal to the sum or the difference between the two
sulfurette, sulphurette - combine with sulfur
amalgamate, commix, mingle, unify, mix - to bring or combine together or with something else; "resourcefully he mingled music and dance"
carburet - combine with carbon
Adj.1.compound - composed of more than one part; "compound leaves are composed of several lobes; "compound flower heads"
phytology, botany - the branch of biology that studies plants
complex - complicated in structure; consisting of interconnected parts; "a complex set of variations based on a simple folk melody"; "a complex mass of diverse laws and customs"
smooth - of the margin of a leaf shape; not broken up into teeth
rough - of the margin of a leaf shape; having the edge cut or fringed or scalloped
unsubdivided, simple - (botany) of leaf shapes; of leaves having no divisions or subdivisions
2.compound - consisting of two or more substances or ingredients or elements or parts; "soap is a compound substance"; "housetop is a compound word"; "a blackberry is a compound fruit"
complex - complicated in structure; consisting of interconnected parts; "a complex set of variations based on a simple folk melody"; "a complex mass of diverse laws and customs"
3.compound - composed of many distinct individuals united to form a whole or colony; "coral is a colonial organism"
zoological science, zoology - the branch of biology that studies animals
complex - complicated in structure; consisting of interconnected parts; "a complex set of variations based on a simple folk melody"; "a complex mass of diverse laws and customs"

compound

noun
1. combination, mixture, blend, composite, conglomerate, fusion, synthesis, alloy, medley, amalgam, meld, composition Organic compounds contain carbon in their molecules.
combination element
adjective
1. complex, multiple, composite, conglomerate, intricate, not simple a tall shrub with shiny compound leaves
complex single, simple, pure, unmixed
verb
1. intensify, add to, complicate, worsen, heighten, exacerbate, aggravate, magnify, augment, add insult to injury Additional bloodshed will only compound the misery.
intensify moderate, modify, decrease, lessen, minimize
2. combine, unite, mix, blend, fuse, mingle, synthesize, concoct, amalgamate, coalesce, intermingle, meld An emotion oddly compounded of pleasure and bitterness flooded over me.
combine part, divide, segregate

compound

verb
To bring or come together into a united whole:
adjective
Consisting of two or more interconnected parts:
noun
The result of combining:
Translations
فِناء حَوْلَ بِناءمُركّب
sloučeninasloženinasloženýohrazené místoopevněný objekt
indhegningområdesammensætningsammensat
laitosyhdistääyhdisteyhdyssana
לשלב
elegyfogolytáborkeverékösszetételösszetett szó
afgirt svæîiblanda; samsett orî; efnasambandsamsettur
iežogots pagalms/teritorijamaisījumssaliktenissaliktssavienojums
ohradené miestozloženinazlúčenina
spojina
försvåraförvärrasammansattsammansättning

compound

[ˈkɒmpaʊnd]
A. N
1. (Chem) → compuesto m
2. (= word) → palabra f compuesta
3. (= enclosed area) → recinto m (cercado)
B. [ˈkɒmpaʊnd] ADJ
1. (Chem) → compuesto
2. [number, sentence, tense] → compuesto
3. [fracture] → múltiple
C. [kəmˈpaʊnd] VT (fig) [+ problem, difficulty] → agravar
to compound a felonyaceptar dinero para no entablar juicio
D. [kəmˈpaʊnd] VI (Jur etc) to compound withcapitular con
E. [ˈkɒmpaʊnd] CPD compound interest Ninterés m compuesto

compound

[ˈkɒmpaʊnd]
n
(CHEMISTRY) (= substance) → composé m
(LINGUISTICS) (= word) → composé m
(= enclosure) → enclos m, enceinte f
adjcomposé(e)
[kəmˈpaʊnd] vt
(= exacerbate) [+ problem, error, misery] → aggraver
(= constitute) to be compounded of sth → être composé(e) de qchcompound fracture nfracture f compliquéecompound interest nintérêt m composé

compound

:
compound eye
n (Zool) → Facetten- or Netzauge nt
compound fraction
n (Math) → Doppelbruch m
compound fracture
n (Med) → offener or komplizierter Bruch

compound

:
compound interest
n (Fin) → Zinseszins m
compound number
n (Math) → zusammengesetzte Zahl
compound sentence
n (Gram) → Satzgefüge nt; (of two or more main clauses) → Satzreihe f, → Parataxe f

compound

1
n (Chem) → Verbindung f; (Gram) → Kompositum nt, → zusammengesetztes Wort
adj
(Chem) compound substanceVerbindung f
(Gram) tense, wordzusammengesetzt
vt
(rare, = combine) → verbinden; (Chem) → mischen; to be compounded of … (liter)sich zusammensetzen aus …
(Jur) debtbegleichen, tilgen; quarrelbeilegen; to compound a crimeein Verbrechen wegen erhaltener Entschädigung nicht verfolgen
(= make worse)verschlimmern; problemverstärken, vergrößern; this only compounds our difficultiesdas erschwert unsere Lage or Situation noch zusätzlich
vieinen Vergleich schließen; (with creditors) → sich vergleichen; to compound with somebody for somethingsich mit jdm auf etw (acc)einigen

compound

2
n (= enclosed area)Lager nt; (in prison) → Gefängnishof m; (= living quarters)Siedlung f; (in zoo) → Gehege nt

compound

[n ˈkɒmpaʊnd; adj kəmˈpaʊnd]
1. n
a. (enclosed area) → recinto
b. (Chem) → composto (Ling) → parola composta, composto
2. adjcomposto/a
compound substance → composto
3. vt (fig) (problem, difficulty) → peggiorare

compound1

(ˈkompaund) adjective
composed of a number of parts. a compound substance.
noun
a substance, word etc formed from two or more elements. The word racetrack is a compound; chemical compounds.

compound2

(ˈkompaund) noun
a fenced or walled-in area, eg round a factory, school etc.

com·pound

n. compuesto.

compound

n compuesto
References in classic literature ?
But these little instances are trifles indeed, contrasted with the ponderous and dismal German system of piling jumbled compounds together.
Some of them struck me as singularly odd compounds of ardour and flatness; commencing in strong feeling, and concluding in the affected, wordy style that a schoolboy might use to a fancied, incorporeal sweetheart.
During these movements the landlady was busily occupied with mixing the various compounds required by her customers, with her own hands, and occasionally exchanging greetings and inquiries concerning the conditions of their respective families, with such of the villagers as approached the bar.
They are a shining reproof to all low-grade German "ruby" enamels, so-called "boort" facings, and the dangerous and unsatisfactory alumina compounds which please dividend-hunting owners and turn skippers crazy.
The chief pleasure of these philosophers lay in going every Saturday night, when work was done, to Chaseborough, a decayed market-town two or three miles distant; and, returning in the small hours of the next morning, to spend Sunday in sleeping off the dyspeptic effects of the curious compounds sold to them as beer by the monopolizers of the once independent inns.
The fact is," added the doctor, "that Joe, along with a thousand other virtues, has a remarkable talent for the preparation of that delicious beverage: he compounds it of a mixture of various origin, but he never would reveal to me the ingredients.
but it differs in its meaning from the use of the simple, as many other compounds do.
This crook-nosed, gross-bodied harpy'; 'this civic sinner, this judicial highwayman'; 'possessing the morals of the Tenderloin and an honor which thieves' honor puts to shame'; 'who compounds criminality with shyster-sharks, and in atonement railroads the unfortunate and impecunious to rotting cells,'--and so forth and so forth, style sophomoric and devoid of the dignity and tone one would employ in a dissertation on 'Surplus Value,' or 'The Fallacies of Marxism,' but just the stuff the dear public likes.
So far as richness, delicacy, and wildness of flavour, and substantial nourishment were concerned, the viand might well have claimed a decided superiority over the meretricious cookery and laboured compounds of the most renowned artist; though the service of the dainty was certainly achieved in a manner far from artificial.
The first of these humming compounds was a speciality of the Porters, which, through an inscription on its door-posts, gently appealed to your feelings as,
Weller and the red-nosed gentleman had commented on this inhuman usage in a very forcible manner, and had vented a variety of pious and holy execrations against its authors, the latter recommended a bottle of port wine, warmed with a little water, spice, and sugar, as being grateful to the stomach, and savouring less of vanity than many other compounds.
Though the word ambergris is but the French compound for grey amber, yet the two substances are quite distinct.