comprehended


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com·pre·hend

 (kŏm′prĭ-hĕnd′)
tr.v. com·pre·hend·ed, com·pre·hend·ing, com·pre·hends
1. To take in the meaning, nature, or importance of; grasp. See Synonyms at understand.
2. To have as part of something larger; encompass or include. See Synonyms at include.

[Middle English comprehenden, from Latin comprehendere : com-, com- + prehendere, to grasp; see ghend- in Indo-European roots.]

com′pre·hend′i·ble adj.
com′pre·hend′ing·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.comprehended - fully understood or graspedcomprehended - fully understood or grasped; "dangers not yet appreciated"; "these apprehended truths"; "a thing comprehended is a thing known as fully as it can be known"
understood - fully apprehended as to purport or meaning or explanation; "the understood conditions of troop withdrawal were clear"
References in classic literature ?
This appalling declaration, which the scout uttered with the cool assurance of a man who fully comprehended, while he did not fear to face the danger, served to remind Heyward of the importance of the charge with which he himself had been intrusted.
In spite of her cold indignation, and the fact that she could understand only a part of Mattingly's speech, Christie comprehended enough to make her lift her clear eyes to the speaker, as she replied freezingly that she feared she would not trouble them long with her company.
They comprehended nothing of his emotions, and supposed him merely disturbed by the unaccustomed tumult.
Bred up from boyhood in the Custom-House, it was his proper field of activity; and the many intricacies of business, so harassing to the interloper, presented themselves before him with the regularity of a perfectly comprehended system.
But his guttural responses satisfied me at once that he but ill comprehended my meaning.
All the riffraff of the kingdom seemed to be comprehended in it; and all drunk at that.
If he had been a great and wise philosopher, like the writer of this book, he would now have comprehended that Work consists of whatever a body is OBLIGED to do, and that Play consists of whatever a body is not obliged to do.
But, she thought, if there were somebody who not only loved but understood; who spoke her language, comprehended her desires, and responded to her mysterious longings
She speedily comprehended all his merits; the persuasion of his regard for Elinor perhaps assisted her penetration; but she really felt assured of his worth: and even that quietness of manner, which militated against all her established ideas of what a young man's address ought to be, was no longer uninteresting when she knew his heart to be warm and his temper affectionate.