comprise


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com·prise

 (kəm-prīz′)
tr.v. com·prised, com·pris·ing, com·pris·es
1. To be composed of or contain: The staff comprises eight physicians, two dozen nurses, and various administrative people. See Synonyms at include.
2. Usage Problem To compose; make up; constitute: the countries and territories that comprised the British Empire.

[Middle English comprisen, from Old French compris, past participle of comprendre, to include, from Latin comprehendere, comprēndere; see comprehend.]

com·pris′a·ble adj.
Usage Note: The traditional rule states that the whole comprises the parts and the parts compose the whole. In strict usage: The Union comprises 50 states. Fifty states compose (or make up) the Union. Even though careful writers often maintain this distinction, comprise is increasingly used in place of compose, especially in the passive: The Union is comprised of 50 states. Our surveys show that opposition to this usage is abating. In the 1960s, 53 percent of the Usage Panel found this usage unacceptable; in 1996, only 35 percent objected. See Usage Note at include.

comprise

(kəmˈpraɪz)
vb (tr)
1. to include; contain
2. to constitute the whole of; consist of: her singing comprised the entertainment.
[C15: from French compris included, understood, from comprendre to comprehend]
comˈprisable adj
comˈprisal n
Usage: The use of of after comprise should be avoided: the library comprises (not comprises of) 500 000 books and manuscripts

com•prise

(kəmˈpraɪz)

v.t. -prised, -pris•ing.
1. to include or contain: The Soviet Union comprised several republics.
2. to consist of; be composed of: The advisory board comprises six members.
3. to form or constitute: Seminars and lectures comprised the day's activities.
Idioms:
be comprised of, to consist of; be composed of: The sales network is comprised of independent outlets and chain stores.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Middle French compris, past participle of comprendre < Latin comprehēndere; see comprehend]
com•pris′a•ble, adj.
com•pris′al, n.
syn: See include.
usage: comprise has had an interesting history of sense development. In addition to its original senses, dating from the 15th century, “to include” and “to consist of” (The United States of America comprises 50 states), comprise has had since the late 18th century the meaning “to form or constitute” (Fifty states comprise the United States of America). Since the late 19th century it has also been used in passive constructions with a sense synonymous with one of its original meanings, “to consist of, be composed of”: The United States of America is comprised of 50 states. These later uses are often criticized, but they occur with increasing frequency even in formal speech and edited writing.

comprise

1. 'comprise'

You say that something comprises particular things when you are mentioning all its parts.

The village's facilities comprised one public toilet and two telephones.
2. 'be composed of' and 'consist of'

You can also say that something is composed of or consists of particular things. There is no difference in meaning.

The body is composed of many kinds of cells, such as muscle, bone, nerve, and fat.
The committee consists of scientists and engineers.

Be Careful!
Don't use a passive form of consist of. Don't say, for example, 'The committee is consisted of scientists and engineers'.

3. 'constitute'

Constitute works in the opposite way to the verbs just mentioned. If a number of things or people constitute something, they are the parts or members that form it.

Volunteers constitute more than 95% of The Center's work force.
4. 'make up'

Make up can be used in either an active or passive form. In its active form, it has the same meaning as constitute.

Women made up two-fifths of the audience.

In its passive form, it is followed by of and has the same meaning as be composed of.

All substances are made up of molecules.
Nearly half the Congress is made up of lawyers.

Be Careful!
Don't use a progressive form of any of these verbs. Don't say, for example, 'The committee is consisting of scientists and engineers'.

comprise


Past participle: comprised
Gerund: comprising

Imperative
comprise
comprise
Present
I comprise
you comprise
he/she/it comprises
we comprise
you comprise
they comprise
Preterite
I comprised
you comprised
he/she/it comprised
we comprised
you comprised
they comprised
Present Continuous
I am comprising
you are comprising
he/she/it is comprising
we are comprising
you are comprising
they are comprising
Present Perfect
I have comprised
you have comprised
he/she/it has comprised
we have comprised
you have comprised
they have comprised
Past Continuous
I was comprising
you were comprising
he/she/it was comprising
we were comprising
you were comprising
they were comprising
Past Perfect
I had comprised
you had comprised
he/she/it had comprised
we had comprised
you had comprised
they had comprised
Future
I will comprise
you will comprise
he/she/it will comprise
we will comprise
you will comprise
they will comprise
Future Perfect
I will have comprised
you will have comprised
he/she/it will have comprised
we will have comprised
you will have comprised
they will have comprised
Future Continuous
I will be comprising
you will be comprising
he/she/it will be comprising
we will be comprising
you will be comprising
they will be comprising
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been comprising
you have been comprising
he/she/it has been comprising
we have been comprising
you have been comprising
they have been comprising
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been comprising
you will have been comprising
he/she/it will have been comprising
we will have been comprising
you will have been comprising
they will have been comprising
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been comprising
you had been comprising
he/she/it had been comprising
we had been comprising
you had been comprising
they had been comprising
Conditional
I would comprise
you would comprise
he/she/it would comprise
we would comprise
you would comprise
they would comprise
Past Conditional
I would have comprised
you would have comprised
he/she/it would have comprised
we would have comprised
you would have comprised
they would have comprised
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.comprise - be composed of; "The land he conquered comprised several provinces"; "What does this dish consist of?"
be - have the quality of being; (copula, used with an adjective or a predicate noun); "John is rich"; "This is not a good answer"
2.comprise - include or contain; have as a component; "A totally new idea is comprised in this paper"; "The record contains many old songs from the 1930's"
include - have as a part, be made up out of; "The list includes the names of many famous writers"
3.comprise - form or compose; "This money is my only income"; "The stone wall was the backdrop for the performance"; "These constitute my entire belonging"; "The children made up the chorus"; "This sum represents my entire income for a year"; "These few men comprise his entire army"
make - constitute the essence of; "Clothes make the man"
compose - form the substance of; "Greed and ambition composed his personality"
form, constitute, make - to compose or represent:"This wall forms the background of the stage setting"; "The branches made a roof"; "This makes a fine introduction"
straddle, range - range or extend over; occupy a certain area; "The plants straddle the entire state"
fall into, fall under - be included in or classified as; "This falls under the rubric 'various'"
pose, present - introduce; "This poses an interesting question"
supplement - serve as a supplement to; "Vitamins supplemented his meager diet"

comprise

verb
1. be composed of, include, contain, consist of, take in, embrace, encompass, comprehend The exhibition comprises 50 oils and watercolours.
2. make up, form, constitute, compose Women comprise 44% of hospital medical staff.
Usage: The use of of after comprise should be avoided: the library comprises (not comprises of) 6500,000 books and manuscripts. Consist, however, should be followed by of when used in this way: Her crew consisted of children from Devon and Cornwall.

comprise

verb
Translations
يَشْمَل، يَتَضَمَّن
obsahovatskládat se z
bestå afindeholde
samanstanda af
susidėti iš
ietvertsastādītveidot
meydana gelmekoluşmak

comprise

[kəmˈpraɪz] VT (= include) → comprender; (= be made up of) → constar de, consistir en

comprise

[kəmˈpraɪz] vt
(= consist of) → comprendre
to be comprised of → comprendre
(= make up) → constituer

comprise

comprise

[kəmˈpraɪz] vt (also be comprised of) (be made up of) → comprendere; (make up) → costituire

comprise

(kəmˈpraiz) verb
to contain or consist of. Her family comprises two sons and a daughter.

The team comprises (not comprises of) five members.
References in classic literature ?
In their researches into the human frame, it may be that the higher and more subtle faculties of such men were materialised, and that they lost the spiritual view of existence amid the intricacies of that wondrous mechanism, which seemed to involve art enough to comprise all of life within itself.
Finally, though, as will soon be revealed, its contents partly comprise the most delicate oil; yet, you are now to be apprised of the nature of the substance which so impregnably invests all that apparent effeminacy.
Jennings; the length of which, though never exactly fixed, had been expected by all to comprise at least five or six weeks.
By these considerations I was induced to seek some other method which would comprise the advantages of the three and be exempt from their defects.
According to this distribution, each confederacy would comprise an extent of territory larger than that of the kingdom of Great Britain.
But why is the experiment of an extended republic to be rejected, merely because it may comprise what is new?
The conditions of bourgeois society are too narrow to comprise the wealth created by them.
I have just received your letter, and shall devote this whole morning to answering it, as I foresee that a little writing will not comprise what I have to tell you.
It occurred to me that a work of this kind might comprise a variety of those curious details, so interesting to me, illustrative of the fur trade; of its remote and adventurous enterprises, and of the various people, and tribes, and castes, and characters, civilized and savage, affected by its operations.
After the waste of a few minutes in saying the proper nothings, she began to give the invitation which was to comprise all the remaining dues of the Musgroves.
The new statement will comprise the skepticisms as well as the faiths of society, and out of unbeliefs a creed shall be formed.
They therefore began to chat also about other things, and the tulip-fancier found out to his great astonishment what a vast range of subjects a conversation may comprise.