compulsion


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com·pul·sion

 (kəm-pŭl′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of compelling.
b. The state of being compelled.
2.
a. An irresistible impulse to act, regardless of the rationality of the motivation: "The compulsion to protect the powerful from the discomfort of public disclosure feeds further abuse and neglect" (Boston Globe).
b. An act or acts performed in response to such an impulse.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin compulsiō, compulsiōn-, from Latin compulsus, past participle of compellere, to compel; see compel.]

compulsion

(kəmˈpʌlʃən)
n
1. the act of compelling or the state of being compelled
2. something that compels
3. (Psychiatry) psychiatry an inner drive that causes a person to perform actions, often of a trivial and repetitive nature, against his or her will. See also obsession
[C15: from Old French, from Latin compellere to compel]

com•pul•sion

(kəmˈpʌl ʃən)

n.
1. the act of compelling; constraint; coercion.
2. the state or condition of being compelled.
3. a strong, usu. irresistible impulse to perform an act, esp. one that is irrational or contrary to one's will.
[1375–1425; late Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Late Latin compulsiō, derivative (with -tiō -tion) of Latin compellere; see compel]

compulsion

An irresistible urge, often a neurotic reaction, taking such forms as having to wash one’s hands every few minutes or touching certain objects before leaving a room.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.compulsion - an urge to do or say something that might be better left undone or unsaid; "he felt a compulsion to babble on about the accident"
irrational impulse - a strong spontaneous and irrational motivation; "his first impulse was to denounce them"; "the urge to find out got him into trouble"
2.compulsion - an irrational motive for performing trivial or repetitive actions, even against your will; "her compulsion to wash her hands repeatedly"
irrational motive - a motivation that is inconsistent with reason or logic
onomatomania - obsession with a particular word which the person uses repeatedly or which intrudes into consciousness
3.compulsion - using force to cause something to occur; "though pressed into rugby under compulsion I began to enjoy the game"; "they didn't have to use coercion"
causation, causing - the act of causing something to happen
constructive eviction, eviction - action by a landlord that compels a tenant to leave the premises (as by rendering the premises unfit for occupancy); no physical expulsion or legal process is involved

compulsion

noun
1. urge, need, obsession, necessity, preoccupation, drive He felt a compulsion to talk about his ex-wife all the time.
2. force, pressure, obligation, constraint, urgency, coercion, duress, demand Students learn more when they are in classes out of choice rather than compulsion.

compulsion

noun
Power used to overcome resistance:
Translations
إكْراه، إجْبار، ضَغْط عَلى
nátlak
tvang
kényszer
nauîung, òvingun
būtinaiprivalomaspriverstinai
piespiešana
pritisk

compulsion

[kəmˈpʌlʃən] N
1. (= urge) → compulsión f
2. (= force) under compulsiona la fuerza, bajo coacción
you are under no compulsionno tienes ninguna obligación

compulsion

[kəmˈpʌlʃən] n
(= force) → contrainte f, force f
under compulsion → sous la contrainte
(= strong desire) → besoin m
to feel a compulsion to do sth → avoir la manie de faire qch

compulsion

nZwang m, → Druck m; (Psych) → innerer Zwang; under compulsionunter Druck or Zwang; you are under no compulsionSie sind nicht gezwungen, niemand zwingt Sie

compulsion

[kəmˈpʌlʃn] n
a.costrizione f, pressione f
under compulsion → sotto costrizione, dietro or sotto pressione
he is under no compulsion (to do it) → nessuno lo costringe (a farlo)

compulsion

(kəmˈpalʃən) noun
compelling or being compelled. You are under no compulsion to go.
comˈpulsory adjective
which must be done or carried out. Is it compulsory for me to attend the class?; a compulsory examination.
comˈpulsorily adverb

com·pul·sion

n. compulsión.

compulsion

n compulsión f
References in classic literature ?
Highcamp was a plain, bald-headed man, who only talked under compulsion.
Physical compulsion or restraint was effectual, of course, while it lasted.
I said I was a slave, the property of the great Earl Grip, who had arrived just after dark at the Tabard inn in the village on the other side of the water, and had stopped there over night, by compulsion, he being taken deadly sick with a strange and sudden disorder.
Perhaps the president of a corps notices that one of the membership who is no longer an exempt--that is a freshman-- has remained a sophomore some little time without volunteering to fight; some day, the president, instead of calling for volunteers, will APPOINT this sophomore to measure swords with a student of another corps; he is free to decline--everybody says so--there is no compulsion.
Miranda would have allowed, on compulsion, that in the nature of things a large number of persons must necessarily be born outside this sacred precinct; but she had her opinion of them, and it was not a flattering one.
And it is like bending back a stiff spring: it is by compulsion that I do the slightest act not prompted by one thought; and by compulsion that I notice anything alive or dead, which is not associated with one universal idea.
He clasped his hands in despair at the picture of pecuniary compulsion which his fancy had conjured up -- his own golden life-blood spouting from him in great jets of prodigality, under the lancet of Mrs.
I went forth last night on compulsion, and I learnt a lesson which is working now.
So my son took, of his own will, and on no compulsion, to the course in which he can always, when it is his pleasure, outstrip every competitor,' she pursued.
Who but felt of late When the fierce Foe hung on our brok'n Rear Insulting, and pursu'd us through the Deep, With what compulsion and laborious flight We sunk thus low?
Then she took up her basket, rose, and prepared to go, as if under compulsion.
It is not long since it contained forty provinces; but is now not much bigger than all Spain, and consists but of five kingdoms and six provinces, of which part is entirely subject to the Emperor, and part only pays him some tribute, or acknowledgment of dependence, either voluntarily or by compulsion.