computerese


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com·put·er·ese

 (kəm-pyo͞o′tə-rēz′, -rēs′)
n.
The technical language of those involved in computer technology.

computerese

(kəmˌpjuːtəˈriːz)
n
(Computer Science) the jargon and terminology associated with computers

com•put•er•ese

(kəmˌpyu təˈriz, -ˈris)

n.
the jargon and technical terms associated with computers and their operation.
[1955–60]

computerese

language used by those in the business of manufacturing, selling, servicing, or using electronic computers, characterized by many abbreviations and acronyms, excessive use of technical jargon, and, frequently, lack of concern for traditional spelling and grammar.
See also: Language Style
the jargon or language typical of those involved with computers.
See also: Automation
Translations

computerese

[kəmˌpjuːtəˈriːz] Njerga f informática

computerese

n (inf: = jargon) → Computerjargon m
References in periodicals archive ?
IF people in Wales can get official documents in Welsh, older people should be able to get official documents in plain English rather than technical computerese.
You don't have to be a computer teacher or be fluent in computerese to use technology thoughtfully across subjects.
Using the jargon of computerese, reflexes are "hardwired.
a state where people eventually lose the ability to write complete paragraphs consisting of grammatically correct full sentences because they spend most of their time writing short bullet points or computerese slang.
Thoroughly assimilated and fluent in computerese, the tall, dark-haired boy does share his dad's overriding cynicism.
Barely literate in computerese, I had often e-prostrated before this junior lecturer so that he'd extricate me from my latest electronic blunder.
12) Others echoed that criticism, speaking of the "virtual reality" the novel creates, which is made even worse by Pelevin's penchant for computerese.
Jones even draws a distinction between Computerese and Technobabble:
Garner himself has miniessays on AIRLINESE, COMPUTERESE, LEGALESE, and BUREAUCRATESE, and he more or less calls all of them jargon.
I spoke enough computerese to know that "reinitialize" was a bad word, at least when applied to a hard disk that contained three years of files.
In engineering computerese, it means the ability for CAD, computer-aided manufacturing, and computer-aided engineering information to be read universally across programs.

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