computerese


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com·put·er·ese

 (kəm-pyo͞o′tə-rēz′, -rēs′)
n.
The technical language of those involved in computer technology.

computerese

(kəmˌpjuːtəˈriːz)
n
(Computer Science) the jargon and terminology associated with computers

com•put•er•ese

(kəmˌpyu təˈriz, -ˈris)

n.
the jargon and technical terms associated with computers and their operation.
[1955–60]

computerese

language used by those in the business of manufacturing, selling, servicing, or using electronic computers, characterized by many abbreviations and acronyms, excessive use of technical jargon, and, frequently, lack of concern for traditional spelling and grammar.
See also: Language Style
the jargon or language typical of those involved with computers.
See also: Automation
Translations

computerese

[kəmˌpjuːtəˈriːz] Njerga f informática

computerese

n (inf: = jargon) → Computerjargon m
References in periodicals archive ?
Using the jargon of computerese, reflexes are "hardwired.
a state where people eventually lose the ability to write complete paragraphs consisting of grammatically correct full sentences because they spend most of their time writing short bullet points or computerese slang.
Barely literate in computerese, I had often e-prostrated before this junior lecturer so that he'd extricate me from my latest electronic blunder.
12) Others echoed that criticism, speaking of the "virtual reality" the novel creates, which is made even worse by Pelevin's penchant for computerese.
At the heart of its push for new technology is the digital revolution, whereby pictures and words are compressed, encoded and transmitted in computerese, rather than electrical signals, which is then decoded at the other end.
For the millions who need to learn about new software but have no desire to become fluent in computerese, Kilcullen began producing anxiety-free computer reference books.
Compared to Greek, Latin, and Japanese, English is relatively easy to learn, although its vocabulary is extensive and increasing daily as computerese has pushed its way into daily living.
This involves becoming involved in or at least visiting operations when possible, identifying and working with not just key decisionmakers but also the front line people who know the real business, and presenting studies and models not as exercises in techniques but as possible solutions to the real problems of real people - with the presentation in English - not statistics, computerese, or theory.
About the only major difference is that he feels free to use more computerese.

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