conceded


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Related to conceded: concededly

con·cede

 (kən-sēd′)
v. con·ced·ed, con·ced·ing, con·cedes
v.tr.
1. To acknowledge, often reluctantly, as being true, just, or proper; admit: conceded that we made a mistake. See Synonyms at acknowledge.
2.
a. To acknowledge or admit (defeat).
b. To acknowledge defeat in: concede an election; concede a chess match.
3.
a. To yield or surrender (something owned or disputed, such as land): conceded the region when signing the treaty.
b. To yield or grant (a privilege or right, for example).
c. Sports To allow (a goal or point, for example) to be scored by the opposing team or player.
v.intr.
To make a concession or acknowledge defeat; yield: The losing candidate conceded after the polls had closed.

[French concéder, from Latin concēdere : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + cēdere, to yield; see ked- in Indo-European roots.]

con·ced′ed·ly (-sē′dĭd-lē) adv.
con·ced′er n.
References in classic literature ?
Yielding to his powerful interest in the subject, and impatient of a delay that seemed fraught with so much additional danger, Heyward drew still nigher to the dusky group, with an intention of making his offers of compensation more definite, when the white man, motioning with his hand, as if he conceded the disputed point, turned away, saying in a sort of soliloquy, and in the English tongue:
It was partly to get you to do something," I conceded.
And whatever they may reveal of the divine love in the Son, the soft, curled, hermaphroditical Italian pictures, in which his idea has been most successfully embodied; these pictures, so destitute as they are of all brawniness, hint nothing of any power, but the mere negative, feminine one of submission and endurance, which on all hands it is conceded, form the peculiar practical virtues of his teachings.
This had been a conceded point with her old mistress, Marie's mother; and "Miss Marie," as Dinah always called her young mistress, even after her marriage, found it easier to submit than contend; and so Dinah had ruled supreme.
The blunting effects of slavery upon the slaveholder's moral perceptions are known and conceded, the world over; and a privileged class, an aristocracy, is but a band of slaveholders under another name.
It was generally conceded by the artists with whom I talked, that that subdued splendor, that mellow richness, is imparted to the picture by AGE.
Joe was for being a hermit, and living on crusts in a remote cave, and dying, some time, of cold and want and grief; but after listening to Tom, he conceded that there were some conspicuous advantages about a life of crime, and so he consented to be a pirate.
The experience of FREDERICK DOUGLASS, as a slave, was not a peculiar one; his lot was not especially a hard one; his case may be regarded as a very fair specimen of the treatment of slaves in Maryland, in which State it is conceded that they are better fed and less cruelly treated than in Georgia, Alabama, or Louisiana.
With an expressive little cough, and with one steady look at her master, the housekeeper conceded the point, and took her seat against the right-hand door-post.
Spiritual revelations were conceded to England at that favoured period, as at this.
Circumstances beyond my individual control have, for a considerable lapse of time, effected a severance of that intimacy which, in the limited opportunities conceded to me in the midst of my professional duties, of contemplating the scenes and events of the past, tinged by the prismatic hues of memory, has ever afforded me, as it ever must continue to afford, gratifying emotions of no common description.
I think it will be conceded by my most disputatious reader, that she could hardly have directed an unfortunate boy to do anything in the wide world more difficult to be done under the circumstances.