concupiscence


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con·cu·pis·cence

 (kŏn-kyo͞o′pĭ-səns)
n.
A strong desire, especially sexual desire; lust.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin concupīscentia, from Latin concupīscēns, concupīscent-, present participle of concupīscere, inchoative of concupere, to desire strongly : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + cupere, to desire.]

con·cu′pis·cent adj.

concupiscence

(kənˈkjuːpɪsəns)
n
strong desire, esp sexual desire
[C14: from Church Latin concupiscentia, from Latin concupiscere to covet ardently, from cupere to wish, desire]
conˈcupiscent adj

con•cu•pis•cence

(kɒnˈkyu pɪ səns, kɒŋ-)

n.
1. sexual desire; lust.
2. ardent longing.
[1300–50; Middle English < Late Latin concupīscentia < Latin concupīscent-, s. of concupīscēns, present participle of concupīscere <concupere to desire (con- + cupere to desire) + -ia -ia]
con•cu′pis•cent, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.concupiscence - a desire for sexual intimacy
desire - the feeling that accompanies an unsatisfied state
erotic love, sexual love, love - a deep feeling of sexual desire and attraction; "their love left them indifferent to their surroundings"; "she was his first love"
aphrodisia - a desire for heterosexual intimacy
anaphrodisia - decline or absence of sexual desire
passion - a feeling of strong sexual desire
sensualism, sensuality, sensualness - desire for sensual pleasures
amativeness, sexiness, amorousness, eroticism, erotism - the arousal of feelings of sexual desire
fetish - a form of sexual desire in which gratification depends to an abnormal degree on some object or item of clothing or part of the body; "common male fetishes are breasts, legs, hair, shoes, and underwear"
libido - (psychoanalysis) a Freudian term for sexual urge or desire
lecherousness, lust, lustfulness - a strong sexual desire
nymphomania - abnormally intense sexual desire in women
satyriasis - abnormally intense sexual desire in men
the hots - intense sexual desire

concupiscence

noun
Translations

concupiscence

[kənˈkjuːpɪsəns] N (frm) → concupiscencia f

concupiscence

nLüsternheit f
References in classic literature ?
Poor Miss Tita's sense of her failure had produced an extraordinary alteration in her, but I had been too full of my literary concupiscence to think of that.
Our concupiscence is originally bad, our Heart evil, the seat of our Affections captivates and enforceth our Will: So that in voluntary things we are averse from God and goodness, bad by Nature, by ignorance worse, by Art, Discipline, Custom, we get many bad Habits, suffering them to domineer and tyrannise over us, and the Devil is still ready at hand, with his evil suggestions, to tempt our depraved will to some ill-disposed action, to precipitate us to destruction.
Even intercourse between wife and husband for the sake of producing a baby cannot escape the taint of concupiscence, which is overweening desire.
Concupiscence is present in all men and in all areas of their lives; it is born of original sin but is not itself a sin.
Chapter 3 presents unceasing prayer both as practice and as struggle against concupiscence.
In poems such as the Prisons and the Mirror of the Sinful Soul, Marguerite makes frequent reference to the alternating anguish and hope of the soul imprisoned in the body ("Ma paovre ame, esclave, et prisonniere, / Les piedz liez par sa concupiscence /.
The "foreigner" or people of "other nations" were those either inside or outside Israel who embraced the gods of unilateral aristocratic or military power (Amon-Re, Baal) or rapaciousness or concupiscence (Dagon, Ashteroth).
It was not possible to engage in the sexual act without sinful concupiscence.
As Screech's note points out, "trop meilleur" is an interpretation rather than a translation of "melius," and the Vulgate gives merely "uri," so that the fires can be interpreted as those of concupiscence or of hell.
It follows that the concupiscence that remains in the baptized is not, properly speaking, sin.
Phillips's aggressively two-dimensional portrayal of female concupiscence gave Edmier's sculptures a pornographic tinge they would nor otherwise have projected, but in spite of the truly nostalgic picture of woman as a simulated handmaiden to male creativity, the work looked weird and good.
The effects of existential alienation are self-elevation (hubris), unbelief, sin, irrationality, and concupiscence.