concurrence


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con·cur·rence

 (kən-kûr′əns, -kŭr′-) also con·cur·ren·cy (-ən-sē)
n. pl. con·cur·renc·es also con·cur·renc·ies
1. Agreement in opinion.
2. Cooperation, as of agents, circumstances, or events.
3. Simultaneous occurrence; coincidence.

concurrence

(kənˈkʌrəns)
n
1. the act of concurring
2. agreement in opinion; accord; assent
3. cooperation or combination
4. simultaneous occurrence; coincidence
5. (Mathematics) geometry a point at which three or more lines intersect
Also (for senses 1–4): concurrency

con•cur•rence

(kənˈkɜr əns, -ˈkʌr-)

n.
1. the act of concurring.
2. accordance in opinion; agreement.
3. cooperation, as of agents or causes; combined action or effort.
4. simultaneous occurrence; coincidence.
5. Law. the equal sharing of a power or claim.
Also, con•cur′ren•cy.
[1515–25; < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.concurrence - agreement of results or opinions
agreement - the verbal act of agreeing
2.concurrence - acting together, as agents or circumstances or events
cooperation - joint operation or action; "their cooperation with us was essential for the success of our mission"
3.concurrence - a state of cooperationconcurrence - a state of cooperation    
accord, agreement - harmony of people's opinions or actions or characters; "the two parties were in agreement"
4.concurrence - the temporal property of two things happening at the same time; "the interval determining the coincidence gate is adjustable"
simultaneity, simultaneousness - happening or existing or done at the same time
concomitance - occurrence or existence together or in connection with one another
overlap - the property of partial coincidence in time
contemporaneity, contemporaneousness - the quality of belonging to the same period of time
unison - occurring together or simultaneously; "the two spoke in unison"

concurrence

noun
Translations
تَوافَق، تَزامُن
shodasouběžnost
enighedsammenfaldsamtidighedtilslutning
sopimus
samòykki
fikir birliğiuyuşma

concurrence

[kənˈkʌrəns] N
1. (frm) (= consent) → conformidad f
2. (= coincidence) → concurrencia f

concurrence

[kənˈkʌrəns] n
(formal) (= agreement) (between people)accord m

concurrence

n
(= accordance)Übereinstimmung f; (= agreement, permission)Einverständnis nt, → Zustimmung f
(of events)Zusammentreffen nt
(Math) → Schnittpunkt m; at the concurrence of the two linesim Schnittpunkt der beiden Geraden

concur

(kənˈkəː) past tense past participle conˈcurred verb
to agree; to come together, or coincide.
conˈcurrence (-ˈka-) , ((American) -ˈkə:-) noun
concurrent (kənˈkarənt) , ((American) -ˈkə:-) adjective
conˈcurrently adverb
References in classic literature ?
When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no Person shall be convicted without the Concurrence of two thirds of the Members present.
Augusta (replied the noble Youth) I thought you had a better opinion of me, than to imagine I would so abjectly degrade myself as to consider my Father's Concurrence in any of my affairs, either of Consequence or concern to me.
Stuart and Clarke felt highly displeased at his taking so precipitate a step, without waiting for their concurrence, when he must have known that their arrival could not be far distant.
One State, we may remember, persisted for several years in refusing her concurrence, although the enemy remained the whole period at our gates, or rather in the very bowels of our country.
Lydgate, I hope we shall not vary in sentiment as to a measure in which you are not likely to be actively concerned, but in which your sympathetic concurrence may be an aid to me.
Elinor was grateful for the attention, but it could not alter her design; and their mother's concurrence being readily gained, every thing relative to their return was arranged as far as it could be;-- and Marianne found some relief in drawing up a statement of the hours that were yet to divide her from Barton.
The success of it would require not merely a factious majority in the legislature, but the concurrence of the courts of justice and of the body of the people.
Collins," I am particularly obliged to you for this friendly caution, and you may depend upon my not taking so material a step without her ladyship's concurrence.
His brethren of the north had now courteously invited him to be present on an occasion, when the concurrence of every eminent member of their community was peculiarly desirable.
It is a thing I do the rather mention, because, computing backwards, I have found some concurrence.
This could not be otherwise, for in order that the will of Napoleon and Alexander (on whom the event seemed to depend) should be carried out, the concurrence of innumerable circumstances was needed without any one of which the event could not have taken place.
He desired leave to go to Sophia, that he might endeavour to obtain her concurrence with her father's inclinations.