condense


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con·dense

 (kən-dĕns′)
v. con·densed, con·dens·ing, con·dens·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To make more dense or compact: gravity condensing matter into stars.
b. To concentrate (a substance), especially by removing water.
2. To make more concise; abridge or shorten: condensed the list of guests.
3. To cause (a gas or vapor) to change to a liquid.
v.intr.
1. To become more dense or compact.
2. To undergo condensation.

[Middle English condensen, from Old French condenser, from Latin condēnsāre : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + dēnsāre, to thicken (from dēnsus, thick).]

con·dens′a·bil′i·ty n.
con·dens′a·ble, con·dens′i·ble adj.

condense

(kənˈdɛns)
vb
1. (tr) to increase the density of; compress
2. to reduce or be reduced in volume or size; make or become more compact
3. (General Physics) to change or cause to change from a gaseous to a liquid or solid state
4. (Chemistry) chem to undergo or cause to undergo condensation
[C15: from Latin condēnsāre, from dēnsāre to make thick, from dēnsus dense]
conˈdensable, conˈdensible adj
conˌdensaˈbility, conˌdensiˈbility n

con•dense

(kənˈdɛns)

v. -densed, -dens•ing. v.t.
1. to make more dense or compact; reduce the volume or extent of; concentrate.
2. to reduce (a text, speech, etc.) to a shorter form; abridge.
3. to reduce to another and denser form, as a gas or vapor to a liquid or solid state.
v.i.
4. to become denser or more compact.
5. to reduce a book, speech, or the like to a shorter form.
6. to become liquid or solid, as a gas or vapor: The steam condensed into droplets.
[1475–85; < Middle French condenser < Latin condēnsāre=con- con- + dēnsāre to thicken, v. derivative of dēnsus dense]
con•den′sa•ble, con•den′si•ble, adj.
con•den`sa•bil′i•ty, con•den`si•bil′i•ty, n.

condense


Past participle: condensed
Gerund: condensing

Imperative
condense
condense
Present
I condense
you condense
he/she/it condenses
we condense
you condense
they condense
Preterite
I condensed
you condensed
he/she/it condensed
we condensed
you condensed
they condensed
Present Continuous
I am condensing
you are condensing
he/she/it is condensing
we are condensing
you are condensing
they are condensing
Present Perfect
I have condensed
you have condensed
he/she/it has condensed
we have condensed
you have condensed
they have condensed
Past Continuous
I was condensing
you were condensing
he/she/it was condensing
we were condensing
you were condensing
they were condensing
Past Perfect
I had condensed
you had condensed
he/she/it had condensed
we had condensed
you had condensed
they had condensed
Future
I will condense
you will condense
he/she/it will condense
we will condense
you will condense
they will condense
Future Perfect
I will have condensed
you will have condensed
he/she/it will have condensed
we will have condensed
you will have condensed
they will have condensed
Future Continuous
I will be condensing
you will be condensing
he/she/it will be condensing
we will be condensing
you will be condensing
they will be condensing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been condensing
you have been condensing
he/she/it has been condensing
we have been condensing
you have been condensing
they have been condensing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been condensing
you will have been condensing
he/she/it will have been condensing
we will have been condensing
you will have been condensing
they will have been condensing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been condensing
you had been condensing
he/she/it had been condensing
we had been condensing
you had been condensing
they had been condensing
Conditional
I would condense
you would condense
he/she/it would condense
we would condense
you would condense
they would condense
Past Conditional
I would have condensed
you would have condensed
he/she/it would have condensed
we would have condensed
you would have condensed
they would have condensed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.condense - undergo condensation; change from a gaseous to a liquid state and fall in drops; "water condenses"; "The acid distills at a specific temperature"
condense - develop due to condensation; "All our planets condensed out of the same material"
condense - remove water from; "condense the milk"
flux, liquify, liquefy - become liquid or fluid when heated; "the frozen fat liquefied"
2.condense - make more concise; "condense the contents of a book into a summary"
abbreviate, abridge, foreshorten, shorten, contract, reduce, cut - reduce in scope while retaining essential elements; "The manuscript must be shortened"
capsule, capsulise, capsulize, encapsulate - put in a short or concise form; reduce in volume; "capsulize the news"
telescope - make smaller or shorter; "the novel was telescoped into a short play"
3.condense - remove water from; "condense the milk"
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
condense, distil, distill - undergo condensation; change from a gaseous to a liquid state and fall in drops; "water condenses"; "The acid distills at a specific temperature"
condense - cause a gas or vapor to change into a liquid; "The cold air condensed the steam"
4.condense - cause a gas or vapor to change into a liquid; "The cold air condensed the steam"
change integrity - change in physical make-up
condense - remove water from; "condense the milk"
5.condense - become more compact or concentrated; "Her feelings condensed"
deepen, intensify - become more intense; "The debate intensified"; "His dislike for raw fish only deepened in Japan"
concentrate, condense, contract - compress or concentrate; "Congress condensed the three-year plan into a six-month plan"
6.condense - develop due to condensation; "All our planets condensed out of the same material"
come up, arise - result or issue; "A slight unpleasantness arose from this discussion"
condense, distil, distill - undergo condensation; change from a gaseous to a liquid state and fall in drops; "water condenses"; "The acid distills at a specific temperature"
7.condense - compress or concentrate; "Congress condensed the three-year plan into a six-month plan"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
condense - become more compact or concentrated; "Her feelings condensed"

condense

verb
1. abridge, contract, concentrate, compact, shorten, summarize, compress, curtail, encapsulate, abbreviate, epitomize, précis The English translation has been condensed into a single more readable book.
abridge increase, expand, elaborate, enlarge, lengthen, spin out, pad out, expatiate
2. concentrate, reduce, precipitate (Chemistry), thicken, boil down, solidify, coagulate The compressed gas is cooled and condenses into a liquid.
concentrate thin (out), weaken, dilute, water down, make thinner

condense

verb
1. To make short or shorter the duration or extent of:
2. To make thick or thicker, especially through evaporation or condensation:
Translations
يُسيِّل السائِليُكَثِّف، يركّزيوجِز، يُلَخِّص
kondenzovatsrazit sezestručnitzhustit
fortættefortykkegøre kortfattetkondenseresammentrænge
cseppfolyósíttömörít
minnka, styttaòéttaòykkja
aprasojimaskondensacijakondensavimaskondensuotikondensuotis
iebiezinātkondensētkondensētiessabiezētsaīsināt
kondenzovaťzhustiť
kısaltmaközetlemekyoğunlaşmakyoğunlaştırmak

condense

[kənˈdens]
A. VT
1. [+ vapour] → condensar
condensed milkleche f condensada
2. [+ text] → abreviar, resumir
B. VIcondensarse

condense

[kənˈdɛns]
vi [liquid] → se condenser
vt (= shorten) → condenser

condense

vt
(= reduce)kondensieren
(Phys) gaskondensieren; (= compress)verdichten; raysbündeln
(= shorten)zusammenfassen; in a very condensed formin sehr gedrängter Form
vi (gas)kondensieren, sich niederschlagen

condense

[kənˈdɛns]
1. vtcondensare
2. vicondensarsi

condense

(kənˈdens) verb
1. to make smaller. They have produced a condensed version of the book for children.
2. to make (a liquid) thicker, stronger or more concentrated. condensed milk.
3. (of vapour) to turn to liquid. Steam condensed on the kitchen windows.
ˌcondenˈsation (konden-) noun
1. the act of condensing.
2. liquid formed from vapour. I can't see out because of the condensation on the window.

con·dense

v. condensar, hacer más denso o compacto.
References in classic literature ?
As she drew nigh, the arch-fiend whispered him to condense into small compass, and drop into her tender bosom a germ of evil that would be sure to blossom darkly soon, and bear black fruit betimes.
Father Mapple rose, and in a mild voice of unassuming authority ordered the scattered people to condense.
Yet soon he heal'd; for Spirits that live throughout Vital in every part, not as frail man In Entrailes, Heart or Head, Liver or Reines, Cannot but by annihilating die; Nor in thir liquid texture mortal wound Receive, no more then can the fluid Aire: All Heart they live, all Head, all Eye, all Eare, All Intellect, all Sense, and as they please, They Limb themselves, and colour, shape or size Assume, as likes them best, condense or rare.
You boil it in sawdust: you salt it in glue: You condense it with locusts and tape: Still keeping one principal object in view-- To preserve its symmetrical shape.
She sat thinking for some time after I had spoken, and then, turning to me with a brisk air of resolution, she broke into a remarkable statement which I will condense for your benefit.
Philip remembered the story of the Eastern King who, desiring to know the history of man, was brought by a sage five hundred volumes; busy with affairs of state, he bade him go and condense it; in twenty years the sage returned and his history now was in no more than fifty volumes, but the King, too old then to read so many ponderous tomes, bade him go and shorten it once more; twenty years passed again and the sage, old and gray, brought a single book in which was the knowledge the King had sought; but the King lay on his death-bed, and he had no time to read even that; and then the sage gave him the history of man in a single line; it was this: he was born, he suffered, and he died.
His notes already made a formidable range of volumes, but the crowning task would be to condense these voluminous still-accumulating results and bring them, like the earlier vintage of Hippocratic books, to fit a little shelf.
Such experience, to him (to use a trite simile), will be like the storm to the oak, which, though it may scatter the leaves, and snap the smaller branches, serves but to rivet the roots, and to harden and condense the fibres of the tree.
To condense the Squire's meditation, it was somewhat as follows: "I won't tell him to read his Bible, and love and serve God; if he don't do that for his mother's sake and teaching, he won't for mine.