condescension


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con·de·scen·sion

 (kŏn′dĭ-sĕn′shən)
n.
1. The act of condescending or an instance of it.
2. Patronizingly superior behavior or attitude.

[Late Latin condēscēnsiō, condēscēnsiōn-, from condēscēnsus, past participle of condēscendere, to condescend; see condescend.]

condescension

(ˌkɒndɪˈsɛnʃən)
n
the act or an instance of behaving in a patronizing way

con•de•scen•sion

(ˌkɒn dəˈsɛn ʃən)

n.
1. an act or instance of condescending.
2. behavior that is patronizing or condescending.
3. voluntary assumption of equality with a person regarded as inferior.
[1635–45; < Late Latin condēscēnsiō. See con-, descension]

Condescension

 a company of actors—Hare.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.condescension - the trait of displaying arrogance by patronizing those considered inferior
arrogance, haughtiness, hauteur, high-handedness, lordliness - overbearing pride evidenced by a superior manner toward inferiors
2.condescension - a communication that indicates lack of respect by patronizing the recipient
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
3.condescension - affability to your inferiors and temporary disregard for differences of position or rank; "the queen's condescension was intended to make us feel comfortable"
affability, affableness, amiableness, bonhomie, geniality, amiability - a disposition to be friendly and approachable (easy to talk to)

condescension

noun patronizing attitude, superiority, disdain, haughtiness, loftiness, superciliousness, lordliness, airs There was a tinge of condescension in the way the girl received me.

condescension

noun
Superciliously indulgent treatment, especially of those considered inferior:
Translations
تَنازُل
blahosklonnostpovýšenost
nedladenhed
lítillæti; yfirlæti
blahosklonnosť
küçümsemelütuftenezzül

condescension

[ˌkɒndɪˈsenʃən] Ncondescendencia f

condescension

[ˌkɒndɪˈsɛnʃən] ncondescendance f

condescension

n (pej)Herablassung f; (= attitude also)herablassende Haltung

condescension

[ˌkɒndɪˈsɛnʃn] nsussiego, aria di superiorità

condescend

(kondiˈsend) verb
to agree (to do something) in spite of one's feeling of superiority. The president of the company condescended to having dinner with the cleaning staff.
ˌcondeˈscending adjective
giving the impression that one is superior. a condescending manner.
ˌcondeˈscendingly adverb
ˌcondeˈscension (-ʃən) noun
References in classic literature ?
Miss Kate put up her glass, and, having taken a survey of the little tableau before her, shut her sketch book, saying with condescension, "You've a nice accent and in time will be a clever reader.
With an easy condescension, and kind forbearance towards our stupidity -- which, to his order of mind, must have seemed little short of crime -- would he forth-with, by the merest touch of his finger, make the incomprehensible as clear as daylight.
And though of all men the moody captain of the Pequod was the least given to that sort of shallowest assumption; and though the only homage he ever exacted, was implicit, instantaneous obedience; though he required no man to remove the shoes from his feet ere stepping upon the quarter-deck; and though there were times when, owing to peculiar circumstances connected with events hereafter to be detailed, he addressed them in unusual terms, whether of condescension or in terrorem, or otherwise; yet even Captain Ahab was by no means unobservant of the paramount forms and usages of the sea.
They were as humble as animals to me; and when I pro- posed to breakfast with them, they were so flattered, so overwhelmed by this extraordinary condescension of mine that at first they were not able to believe that I was in earnest.
As Harriet now lived, the Martins could not get at her, without seeking her, where hitherto they had wanted either the courage or the condescension to seek her; for since her refusal of the brother, the sisters never had been at Mrs.
The equality between her and me was real; not the mere result of condescension on her part: so much the better--my position was all the freer.
He was saying the affectionate word, however, with a far more grudging condescension and patronage than he could have shown if their relative merits and positions had been reversed (which is invariably the case, all the world over), when Mr.
and in the hall appeared the schoolmaster himself, who glared on Master Scrooge with a ferocious condescension, and threw him into a dreadful state of mind by shaking hands with him.
He told me, when I shook hands with him, that he was proud to be noticed by me, and that he really felt obliged to me for my condescension.
I promised myself that I would do something for them one of these days, and formed a plan in outline for bestowing a dinner of roast-beef and plumpudding, a pint of ale, and a gallon of condescension, upon everybody in the village.
And in consequence of this, the party on the high-screened seats in the kitchen was more numerous than usual; several personages, who would otherwise have been admitted into the parlour and enlarged the opportunity of hectoring and condescension for their betters, being content this evening to vary their enjoyment by taking their spirits-and-water where they could themselves hector and condescend in company that called for beer.
But if we are allowed to sit at meat with her,--ever a royal condescension,--it is ours at least to pass her the salt, to see that she is never kept waiting a moment for the mustard or the pepper, to cut the bread for her with geometrical precision, and to lean as near her warm shoulder as we dare to pour out for her the sacred wine.