conditioned response


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conditioned response

n. Psychology
A new or modified response elicited by a stimulus after conditioning. Also called conditioned reflex.

conditioned response

n
(Psychology) psychol a response that is transferred from the second to the first of a pair of stimuli. A well-known Pavlovian example is salivation by a dog when it hears a bell ring, because food has always been presented when the bell has been rung previously. Also called (esp formerly): conditioned reflex See also classical conditioning, unconditioned response
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conditioned response - an acquired response that is under the control of (conditional on the occurrence of) a stimulusconditioned response - an acquired response that is under the control of (conditional on the occurrence of) a stimulus
learned reaction, learned response - a reaction that has been acquired by learning
conditioned avoidance, conditioned avoidance response - a conditioned response that anticipates the occurrence of an aversive stimulus
References in periodicals archive ?
Of further concern is the suggestion that it is unlikely that a classically conditioned response could come under the control of an abstract verbal stimulus, such as "truth value," on theoretical grounds.
Rather, I am saying that the producers of the film were aware of the theory of "classic conditioned response.
Elicitation of the conditioned responses (CRs) in the nonsleep state is specific to the sleep stage present during training.
For hunters to be successful, they have to get outside of that conditioned response.
Much of the focus of discussion was on criminal behavior and state-sanctioned punishment, and whether a conditioned response was a preferable form of behavior modification than incarceration.
First, something different may involve reproducing an 'old' conditioned response in an unfamiliar setting.
Instead of simplistic rules to help readers get better at choosing, Iyengar gently points out the pathologies of bias and conditioned response.
These bibles, trained every school morning since the bequest of thirty years ago, had developed a conditioned response.
The craft of hypnosis interrupts the conditioned response to stress and other stimuli.
At my Stop-Smoking Programme we keep exposing the person to the stimulus, but train them not to get the conditioned response.
Moreover, since the mechanisms of conditioning were naturally selected for producing stimulus-response correlations, there's a sense in which the representation of a given stimulus has the derivative function of eliciting its conditioned response.
Later, simply the ringing of a bell (even with no food accompanying the pealing) elicited the same conditioned response.