conduct


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

con·duct

 (kən-dŭkt′)
v. con·duct·ed, con·duct·ing, con·ducts
v.tr.
1. To direct the course of; manage or control: a police officer who conducts traffic; a scientist who conducts experiments.
2. To lead or guide: conducted the tourists through the museum.
3. Music To direct the performance of (an orchestra or chorus, for example).
4. To serve as a medium for conveying; transmit: Some metals conduct heat.
5. To comport (oneself) in a specified way: The students conducted themselves with dignity throughout the ceremony.
v.intr.
1. To act as a director or conductor.
2. To show the way; lead.
n. (kŏn′dŭkt′)
1. The way a person acts, especially from the standpoint of morality and ethics.
2. The act of directing or controlling; management.
3. Obsolete A guide; an escort.

[Middle English conducten, from Latin condūcere, conduct-, to lead together; see conduce.]

con·duct′i·bil′i·ty n.
con·duct′i·ble adj.
Synonyms: conduct, direct, manage, control, steer1
These verbs mean to exercise direction over an activity: Conduct applies to the guidance, authority, and responsibility of a single person or group: The judge conducted the hearing. The committee conducted an investigation into the scandal.
Direct stresses regulation to ensure proper planning and implementation: The seasoned politician directed a brilliant political campaign.
Manage suggests ongoing guidance of a person, group, or organization: It takes skill to manage a large hotel.
Control stresses regulation and usually domination through restraint: The harbormaster controls the number of boats allowed inside the breakwater.
Steer suggests guidance that controls direction or course: I deftly steered the conversation away from politics. See Also Synonyms at accompany, behavior.

conduct

n
1. the manner in which a person behaves; behaviour
2. the way of managing a business, affair, etc; handling
3. rare the act of guiding or leading
4. rare a guide or leader
vb
5. (tr) to accompany and guide (people, a party, etc) (esp in the phrase conducted tour)
6. (tr) to lead or direct (affairs, business, etc); control
7. (tr) to do or carry out: conduct a survey.
8. (tr) to behave or manage (oneself): the child conducted himself well.
9. (Music, other) to control or guide (an orchestra, choir, etc) by the movements of the hands or a baton. Also (esp US): direct
10. (General Physics) to transmit (heat, electricity, etc): metals conduct heat.
[C15: from Medieval Latin conductus escorted, from Latin: drawn together, from condūcere to conduce]
conˈductible adj
conˌductiˈbility n

con•duct

(n. ˈkɒn dʌkt; v. kənˈdʌkt)

n.
1. personal behavior; way of acting; deportment.
2. direction, management, or execution: the conduct of a business.
3. the act of leading; guidance; escort.
4. Obs. a guide; escort.
v.t.
5. to behave or manage (oneself).
6. to direct in action or course; manage; carry on: to conduct a test.
7. to direct (an orchestra, chorus, etc.) as leader.
8. to lead or guide; escort: to conduct a tour.
9. to serve as a channel or medium for (heat, electricity, sound, etc.): Copper conducts electricity.
v.i.
10. to lead.
11. to act as conductor, esp. of a musical group.
[1440–1450; late Middle English < Medieval Latin conductus escort < Latin conductus, past participle of condūcere conduce]
con•duct′i•ble, adj.
con•duct`i•bil′i•ty, n.

conduct


Past participle: conducted
Gerund: conducting

Imperative
conduct
conduct
Present
I conduct
you conduct
he/she/it conducts
we conduct
you conduct
they conduct
Preterite
I conducted
you conducted
he/she/it conducted
we conducted
you conducted
they conducted
Present Continuous
I am conducting
you are conducting
he/she/it is conducting
we are conducting
you are conducting
they are conducting
Present Perfect
I have conducted
you have conducted
he/she/it has conducted
we have conducted
you have conducted
they have conducted
Past Continuous
I was conducting
you were conducting
he/she/it was conducting
we were conducting
you were conducting
they were conducting
Past Perfect
I had conducted
you had conducted
he/she/it had conducted
we had conducted
you had conducted
they had conducted
Future
I will conduct
you will conduct
he/she/it will conduct
we will conduct
you will conduct
they will conduct
Future Perfect
I will have conducted
you will have conducted
he/she/it will have conducted
we will have conducted
you will have conducted
they will have conducted
Future Continuous
I will be conducting
you will be conducting
he/she/it will be conducting
we will be conducting
you will be conducting
they will be conducting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been conducting
you have been conducting
he/she/it has been conducting
we have been conducting
you have been conducting
they have been conducting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been conducting
you will have been conducting
he/she/it will have been conducting
we will have been conducting
you will have been conducting
they will have been conducting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been conducting
you had been conducting
he/she/it had been conducting
we had been conducting
you had been conducting
they had been conducting
Conditional
I would conduct
you would conduct
he/she/it would conduct
we would conduct
you would conduct
they would conduct
Past Conditional
I would have conducted
you would have conducted
he/she/it would have conducted
we would have conducted
you would have conducted
they would have conducted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conduct - manner of acting or controlling yourselfconduct - manner of acting or controlling yourself
activity - any specific behavior; "they avoided all recreational activity"
aggression - deliberately unfriendly behavior
bohemianism - conduct characteristic of a bohemian
dirty pool - conduct that is unfair or unethical or unsportsmanlike
dirty tricks - underhand commercial or political behavior designed to discredit an opponent
offense, offensive activity, discourtesy, offence - a lack of politeness; a failure to show regard for others; wounding the feelings or others
easiness - the quality of being easy in behavior or style; "there was an easiness between them"; "a natural easiness of manner"
the way of the world, the ways of the world - the manner in which people typically behave or things typically happen; "the ordinary reader is endowed with considerable wisdom and knowledge of the way of the world"; "she was well-versed in the ways of the world before she had taken the veil"; "he was amazingly innocent of the ways of the world"
2.conduct - (behavioral attributes) the way a person behaves toward other peopleconduct - (behavioral attributes) the way a person behaves toward other people
trait - a distinguishing feature of your personal nature
manners - social deportment; "he has the manners of a pig"
citizenship - conduct as a citizen; "award for good citizenship"
swashbuckling - flamboyantly reckless and boastful behavior
correctitude, properness, propriety - correct or appropriate behavior
improperness, impropriety - an improper demeanor
personal manner, manner - a way of acting or behaving
Verb1.conduct - direct the course of; manage or control; "You cannot conduct business like this"
handle, manage, care, deal - be in charge of, act on, or dispose of; "I can deal with this crew of workers"; "This blender can't handle nuts"; "She managed her parents' affairs after they got too old"
racketeer - carry on illegal business activities involving crime
2.conduct - lead, as in the performance of a composition; "conduct an orchestra; Barenboim conducted the Chicago symphony for years"
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
perform, do, execute - carry out or perform an action; "John did the painting, the weeding, and he cleaned out the gutters"; "the skater executed a triple pirouette"; "she did a little dance"
conduct - lead musicians in the performance of; "Bernstein conducted Mahler like no other conductor"; "she cannot conduct modern pieces"
3.conduct - behave in a certain mannerconduct - behave in a certain manner; "She carried herself well"; "he bore himself with dignity"; "They conducted themselves well during these difficult times"
carry, bear, hold - support or hold in a certain manner; "She holds her head high"; "He carried himself upright"
fluster - be flustered; behave in a confused manner
act, move - perform an action, or work out or perform (an action); "think before you act"; "We must move quickly"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"; "The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel"
put forward, assert - insist on having one's opinions and rights recognized; "Women should assert themselves more!"
deal - behave in a certain way towards others; "He deals fairly with his employees"
walk around - behave in a certain manner or have certain properties; "He walks around with his nose in the air"; "She walks around with this strange boyfriend"
posture, pose - behave affectedly or unnaturally in order to impress others; "Don't pay any attention to him--he is always posing to impress his peers!"; "She postured and made a total fool of herself"
4.conduct - take somebody somewhere; "We lead him to our chief"; "can you take me to the main entrance?"; "He conducted us to the palace"
beacon - guide with a beacon
hand - guide or conduct or usher somewhere; "hand the elderly lady into the taxi"
misguide, mislead, lead astray, misdirect - lead someone in the wrong direction or give someone wrong directions; "The pedestrian misdirected the out-of-town driver"
usher, show - take (someone) to their seats, as in theaters or auditoriums; "The usher showed us to our seats"
5.conduct - transmit or serve as the medium for transmissionconduct - transmit or serve as the medium for transmission; "Sound carries well over water"; "The airwaves carry the sound"; "Many metals conduct heat"
convey, express, carry - serve as a means for expressing something; "The painting of Mary carries motherly love"; "His voice carried a lot of anger"
bring, convey, take - take something or somebody with oneself somewhere; "Bring me the box from the other room"; "Take these letters to the boss"; "This brings me to the main point"
wash up - carry somewhere (of water or current or waves); "The tide washed up the corpse"
pipe in - bring in through pipes; "Music was piped into the offices"
bring in - transmit; "The microphone brought in the sounds from the room next to mine"
retransmit - transmit again
carry - be conveyed over a certain distance; "Her voice carries very well in this big opera house"
6.conduct - lead musicians in the performance of; "Bernstein conducted Mahler like no other conductor"; "she cannot conduct modern pieces"
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
perform - give a performance (of something); "Horowitz is performing at Carnegie Hall tonight"; "We performed a popular Gilbert and Sullivan opera"
conduct, direct, lead - lead, as in the performance of a composition; "conduct an orchestra; Barenboim conducted the Chicago symphony for years"

conduct

verb
1. carry out, run, control, manage, direct, handle, organize, govern, regulate, administer, supervise, preside over I decided to conduct an experiment.
2. transmit, carry, spread, pass on, convey, diffuse, impart Water conducts heat faster than air.
3. accompany, lead, escort, guide, attend, steer, convey, usher, pilot He asked if he might conduct us to the ball.
noun
1. management, running, control, handling, administration, direction, leadership, organization, guidance, supervision Also up for discussion will be the conduct of free and fair elections.
2. behaviour, ways, bearing, attitude, manners, carriage, demeanour, deportment, mien (literary), comportment Other people judge you by your conduct.
conduct yourself behave yourself, act, carry yourself, acquit yourself, deport yourself, comport yourself The way he conducts himself reflects on the party.

conduct

verb
1. To control the course of (an activity):
2. To engage in (a war or campaign, for example):
3. To show the way to:
4. To serve as a conduit:
noun
The manner in which one behaves:
action (often used in plural), behavior, comportment, deportment, way.
Translations
إدارَه، تَدْبيرسُلوك، تَصَرُّفيَتَصَرَّفُ تَصَرُّفا حَسَنا، يَتَأَدَّبيُدَبِّرُ شُؤون العَمَليَقود
véstdirigovatprovádětprovéstřídit
dirigeredriftdriveførelede
hoitaajohtaajohtaminenkäytöskäyttäytyä
provesti
vezényeligazgat
fara meî, fylgjaframkvæmd, stjórnhaga sérhegîunleiîa
行う
...을 실시하다
atliktidirigentasdiriguotielgsenakonduktorius
diriģētpavadītuzvestiesvadītvest
dirigovať
dirigirativedenjevoditi
föraledauträtta
จัดการ
yürütmekdavranışdavranmakgeçirmekhareketlerini kontrol etmek
thực hiện

conduct

A. [ˈkɒndʌkt] N (= behaviour) → comportamiento m, conducta f; [of business etc] → dirección f, manejo m
B. [kənˈdʌkt] VT
1. (= guide) → llevar, conducir
conducted tourvisita f con guía
we were conducted to the interview roomnos llevaron or condujeron a la sala de entrevistas
we were conducted round by Lord RiceLord Rice actuó de guía
2. [+ heat, electricity] → conducir
3. [+ campaign] → dirigir, llevar; [+ legal case] → presentar (Mus) → dirigir
I don't like the way they conduct businessno me gusta la forma en que llevan los negocios, no me gusta la forma de hacer negocios que tienen
to conduct a correspondence with sbestar en correspondencia con algn, cartearse con algn
4. (= behave) to conduct o.scomportarse
C. [kənˈdʌkt] VI (Mus) → dirigir
D. [ˈkɒndʌkt] CPD conduct report N (Scol) → informe m de conducta

conduct

[ˈkɒndʌkt] n (= behaviour) → conduite f
vt [kənˈdʌkt]
(= manage) [+ business] → mener
to conduct o.s. → se conduire, se comporter
(= carry out) [+ survey] → mener, conduire
[+ orchestra, choir] → diriger
(ELECTRICITY, ELECTRONICS) [+ electricity, heat] → être conducteur/trice
(= lead) [+ person] → conduireconducted tour [kənˌdʌktɪdˈtʊər] n [region] → voyage m organisé; [building] → visite f guidée

conduct

n
(= behaviour)Verhalten nt, → Benehmen nt(towards gegenüber); (of children also)Betragen nt; (of prisoner)Führung f; the rules of conductdie Verhaltensregeln
(= management)Führung f; (of conference, commission of inquiry)Leitung f; (of investigation)Durchführung f; his conduct of the warseine Kriegsführung; their conduct of the campaigndie Art, wie sie die Kampagne durchführen/durchgeführt haben
vt
(= guide)führen; (ceremoniously) → geleiten (geh); conducted tour (of) (of country)Gesellschaftsreise f(durch); (of building)Führung f(durch)
(= direct, manage) war, campaign, correspondence, conversationführen; meeting, business alsoleiten; investigationdurchführen; private affairshandhaben; he conducted his own defenceer übernahm seine eigene Verteidigung
(Mus) → dirigieren
(Phys, Physiol) → leiten; lightningableiten, erden
vi
(Mus) → dirigieren
(Phys) → leiten
vrsich verhalten, sich benehmen; (prisoner)sich führen; her husband conducted himself abominablyihr Mann führte sich unmöglich auf

conduct

[n ˈkɒndʌkt; vb kənˈdʌkt]
1. ncondotta
2. vt (gen) (Phys) → condurre; (guide) → accompagnare (Law) → presentare (Mus) → dirigere; (manage) → dirigere, amministrare
to conduct o.s. → comportarsi

conduct

(kənˈdakt) verb
1. to lead or guide. We were conducted down a narrow path by the guide; He conducted the tour.
2. to carry or allow to flow. Most metals conduct electricity.
3. to direct (an orchestra, choir etc).
4. to behave (oneself). He conducted himself well at the reception.
5. to manage or carry on (a business).
(ˈkondakt) noun
1. behaviour. His conduct at school was disgraceful.
2. the way in which something is managed, done etc. the conduct of the affair.
conducted tour noun
conˈduction (-ʃən) noun
transmission of heat etc by a conductor.
conˈductor noun
1. a thing that conducts heat or electricity. Copper is a good conductor of heat.
2. a director of an orchestra, choir etc.
3. (feminine conˈductress) a person who collects fares on a bus etc. a bus conductor.
4. (American) a guard on a train.

conduct

يَقُودُ provést udføre leiten διεξάγω conducir, llevar a cabo tehdä mener provesti condurre 行う ...을 실시하다 uitvoeren føre zaprowadzić conduzir проводить uträtta จัดการ yürütmek thực hiện 进行

conduct

v. dirigir, conducir.
References in classic literature ?
cried Jo, prancing about while Meg went to conduct Mother to the seat of honor.
Now, with a ring of earnestness in his voice, he was advising concerning some course of conduct.
The article seems to be written with an idea of interesting scientists and research societies, so that they will raise money to conduct a searching expedition.
It was a fixed belief with Madame Lebrun that the conduct of the universe and all things pertaining thereto would have been manifestly of a more intelligent and higher order had not Monsieur Lebrun been removed to other spheres during the early years of their married life.
I wish no contention of idle words with you, friend," said Heyward, curbing his dissatisfied manner, and speaking in a more gentle voice; "if you will tell me the distance to Fort Edward, and conduct me thither, your labor shall not go without its reward.
Let these influencing powers actuate, by the permission or disposal of Providence, from selfish or social views, yet in time the mysterious will of Heaven is unfolded, and we behold our conduct, from whatsoever motives excited, operating to answer the important designs of heaven.
You force me to anticipate a disclosure I expected to make to you only when I came to ask permission to woo your daughter Jessie; and when I tell you what it is, you will understand that I have no right to criticise your conduct.
It was well known that the victim had recognized the bitterness of personal enmity in his persecutor's conduct towards him, and that he declared himself hunted to death for his spoil.
There was one direction, assuredly, in which these discoveries stopped: deep obscurity continued to cover the region of the boy's conduct at school.
And how pleasing to God was this conduct in Jonah, is shown in the eventual deliverance of him from the sea and the whale.
However curious it may seem for an oil-ship to be borrowing oil on the whale-ground, and however much it may invertedly contradict the old proverb about carrying coals to Newcastle, yet sometimes such a thing really happens; and in the present case Captain Derick De Deer did indubitably conduct a lamp-feeder as Flask did declare.
If you don't stop that directly, I'll have you arrested for leaving your horses, and for brutal conduct.