conduction


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Related to conduction: electrical conduction, Heat conduction

con·duc·tion

 (kən-dŭk′shən)
n.
The transmission or conveying of something through a medium or passage, especially the transmission of electric charge or heat through a conducting medium without perceptible motion of the medium itself.

conduction

(kənˈdʌkʃən)
n
1. (General Physics) the transfer of energy by a medium without bulk movement of the medium itself: heat conduction; electrical conduction; sound conduction. Compare convection1
2. (Physiology) the transmission of an electrical or chemical impulse along a nerve fibre
3. the act of conveying or conducting, as through a pipe
4. (General Physics) physics another name for conductivity1
conˈductional adj

con•duc•tion

(kənˈdʌk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of conducting, as of water through a pipe.
2.
a. the transfer of heat between two parts of a stationary system at different temperatures.
3. the carrying of sound waves, electrons, heat, or nerve impulses by a nerve or other tissue.
[1530–40; < Latin]
con•duc′tion•al, adj.

con·duc·tion

(kən-dŭk′shən)
The flow of energy, such as heat or an electric charge, through a substance. In heat conduction, the energy flows by direct contact of the substance's molecules with each other. Although the molecules vibrate, they do not change position in the transfer of energy. In electrical conduction, energy flows by the movement of electrons or ions.
Did You Know? Heat is a form of energy that results in the motion of molecules. Heat travels by conduction, convection, or radiation. In conduction, heat spreads through a solid by making its molecules vibrate faster. As faster molecules bump slower ones, the slower ones are made to vibrate faster, and the solid becomes hotter. This is how the handle of a teaspoon sticking out of a cup of hot tea eventually gets hot. When liquids and gases are heated, their molecules, which are free to move about, move farther apart. The hotter portions of the liquid or gas expand, become less dense, and rise, and cooler portions move down to take their place. This movement causes the liquid or gas to circulate in the process called convection. The currents of the ocean are convection currents caused by the uneven heating of the ocean waters by the sun. Radiation carries heat in the form of waves through space. A hot object, like the hot wire in a heat lamp, gives off energy waves called infrared rays. When these rays strike an object, its molecules absorb the rays' energy and vibrate or move faster, and so the object becomes hotter. The sunlight that warms your face has traveled through 93 million miles of space by radiation.

conduction

1. The transfer of heat from molecule to molecule.
2. The flow of electrons from atom to atom through a conductor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conduction - the transmission of heat or electricity or sound
physical phenomenon - a natural phenomenon involving the physical properties of matter and energy
electrical conduction - the passage of electricity through a conductor
Translations
تَوْصيلُ الحَرارَه
vedení
ledning
johtuminen
kondukcija
hõvezetés
varmaleiîing
konduksjonledning
iletim

conduction

[kənˈdʌkʃən] N (Elec) → conducción f

conduction

[kənˈdʌkʃən] n (ELECTRICITY, ELECTRONICS) [heat, electricity] → conduction f

conduction

n (Phys, Physiol) → Leitung f (→ along durch or (Physiol) → entlang)

conduction

[kənˈdʌkʃn] n (Elec, Phys) → conduzione f

conduct

(kənˈdakt) verb
1. to lead or guide. We were conducted down a narrow path by the guide; He conducted the tour.
2. to carry or allow to flow. Most metals conduct electricity.
3. to direct (an orchestra, choir etc).
4. to behave (oneself). He conducted himself well at the reception.
5. to manage or carry on (a business).
(ˈkondakt) noun
1. behaviour. His conduct at school was disgraceful.
2. the way in which something is managed, done etc. the conduct of the affair.
conducted tour noun
conˈduction (-ʃən) noun
transmission of heat etc by a conductor.
conˈductor noun
1. a thing that conducts heat or electricity. Copper is a good conductor of heat.
2. a director of an orchestra, choir etc.
3. (feminine conˈductress) a person who collects fares on a bus etc. a bus conductor.
4. (American) a guard on a train.

conduction

n conducción f
References in periodicals archive ?
Aim and Objectives: To study the correlation of height with the nerve conduction study (NCS) variables, i.
Analysis of the data shows that the farmers' competency in the conduction of agricultural activities land preparation and direct sowing were top in rank order in member and non-members' farmers.
Objective: To find out the frequency of ischemic heart disease in patients with conduction disorders requiring permanent pacemaker implantation.
A successful bone conduction hearing aid was implanted for the first time in the UAE, on a patient with a thin skull thickness by Dubai Hospital doctors, helping an Emirati teenager born with hearing difficulty.
Dubai: A teenager has fully gained her hearing ability after getting a successful bone conduction hearing aid implant by Dubai Hospital doctors.
The ensuing atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia has a reentrant circuit usually characterized by so-called orthdromic conduction down the atrioventricular node, His bundle, and bundle branches, i.
Background and Objectives: Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) test measures the speed of conduction of an electrical impulse through a nerve.
A drug commonly used to treat high blood pressure has been shown to significantly reduce the risk of blocked electrical impulses to the heart and could be an effective treatment for certain types of heart disease known as conduction disease, in which the progression of electrical impulses through the heart is impeded, according to researchers at UCSF and Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU).
Background: To study lesions' location and prognosis of cubital tunnel syndrome (CubTS) by routine motor nerve conduction studies (MNCSs) and short-segment nerve conduction studies (SSNCSs, inching test).
Sural nerve sensory conduction and tibial and peroneal nerve motor conduction studies at least in one lower extremity and median and ulnar nerve motor and sensory conduction studies and palmar cutaneous nerve sensory conduction studies in both upper extremities were performed in all patients.
Bisphenol A (BPA) may slow electrical conduction in the heart, according to a 2014 laboratory experiment.
Diffusion and Conduction in Zeolites: Data Compilation