vessel

(redirected from conduit vessel)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

ves·sel

 (vĕs′əl)
n.
1. A hollow utensil, such as a cup, vase, or pitcher, used as a container, especially for liquids.
2.
a. Nautical A craft, especially one larger than a rowboat, designed to navigate on water.
b. An airship.
3. Anatomy A duct, canal, or other tube that contains or conveys a body fluid: a blood vessel.
4. Botany One of the tubular water-conducting structures of xylem, consisting of a series of vessel elements attached end to end and connected by perforations. Vessels are found in nearly all flowering plants.
5. A person seen as the agent or embodiment, as of a quality: a vessel of mercy.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin vāscellum, diminutive of Latin vāsculum, diminutive of vās, vessel.]

vessel

(ˈvɛsəl)
n
1. any object used as a container, esp for a liquid
2. (Nautical Terms) a passenger or freight-carrying ship, boat, etc
3. (Aeronautics) an aircraft, esp an airship
4. (Anatomy) anatomy a tubular structure that transports such body fluids as blood and lymph
5. (Botany) botany a tubular element of xylem tissue consisting of a row of cells in which the connecting cell walls have broken down
6. rare a person regarded as an agent or vehicle for some purpose or quality: she was the vessel of the Lord.
[C13: from Old French vaissel, from Late Latin vascellum urn, from Latin vās vessel]

ves•sel

(ˈvɛs əl)

n.
1. a craft for traveling on water, esp. a fairly large one.
2. a hollow or concave utensil, as a cup, bowl, or pitcher, used for holding liquids or other contents.
3. a tube or duct, as an artery or vein, conveying blood or some other body fluid.
4. a water-conducting duct within the xylem of vascular plants, composed of connected cells without intervening partitions.
5. a person regarded as a holder or receiver of a particular trait or quality: a vessel of grace.
[1250–1300; < Old French vessel, va(i)ssel < Latin vāscellum, derivative of vās (see vase)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vessel - a tube in which a body fluid circulates
tube-shaped structure, tube - (anatomy) any hollow cylindrical body structure
blood vessel - a vessel in which blood circulates
vascular system - the vessels and tissue that carry or circulate fluids such as blood or lymph or sap through the body of an animal or plant
2.vessel - a craft designed for water transportationvessel - a craft designed for water transportation
anchor, ground tackle - a mechanical device that prevents a vessel from moving
bareboat - a vessel (such as a yacht) that can be chartered without a captain or crew or provisions
bilge - where the sides of the vessel curve in to form the bottom
bilge keel - either of two lengthwise fins attached along the outside of a ship's bilge; reduces rolling
boat - a small vessel for travel on water
fore, prow, bow, stem - front part of a vessel or aircraft; "he pointed the bow of the boat toward the finish line"
clench, clinch - a small slip noose made with seizing
craft - a vehicle designed for navigation in or on water or air or through outer space
fishing boat, fishing smack, fishing vessel - a vessel for fishing; often has a well to keep the catch alive
galley - (classical antiquity) a crescent-shaped seagoing vessel propelled by oars
galley - a large medieval vessel with a single deck propelled by sails and oars with guns at stern and prow; a complement of 1,000 men; used mainly in the Mediterranean for war and trading
hull - the frame or body of ship
ice yacht, iceboat, scooter - a sailing vessel with runners and a cross-shaped frame; suitable for traveling over ice
patrol boat, patrol ship - a vessel assigned to patrol an area
rudder - (nautical) steering mechanism consisting of a hinged vertical plate mounted at the stern of a vessel
sailing ship, sailing vessel - a vessel that is powered by the wind; often having several masts
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
shrimper - a vessel engaged in shrimping
strake, wale - thick plank forming a ridge along the side of a wooden ship
splashboard, washboard - protective covering consisting of a broad plank along a gunwale to keep water from splashing over the side
weather ship - an oceangoing vessel equipped to make meteorological observations
racing yacht, yacht - an expensive vessel propelled by sail or power and used for cruising or racing
3.vessel - an object used as a container (especially for liquids)vessel - an object used as a container (especially for liquids)
autoclave, steriliser, sterilizer - a device for heating substances above their boiling point; used to manufacture chemicals or to sterilize surgical instruments
barrel, cask - a cylindrical container that holds liquids
base - a flat bottom on which something is intended to sit; "a tub should sit on its own base"
basin - a bowl-shaped vessel; usually used for holding food or liquids; "she mixed the dough in a large basin"
bath - a vessel containing liquid in which something is immersed (as to process it or to maintain it at a constant temperature or to lubricate it); "she soaked the etching in an acid bath"
bathing tub, bathtub, tub, bath - a relatively large open container that you fill with water and use to wash the body
bedpan - a shallow vessel used by a bedridden patient for defecation and urination
boiler, steam boiler - sealed vessel where water is converted to steam
bone-ash cup, cupel, refractory pot - a small porous bowl made of bone ash used in assaying to separate precious metals from e.g. lead
bottle - a glass or plastic vessel used for storing drinks or other liquids; typically cylindrical without handles and with a narrow neck that can be plugged or capped
feeding bottle, nursing bottle, bottle - a vessel fitted with a flexible teat and filled with milk or formula; used as a substitute for breast feeding infants and very young children
bowl - a round vessel that is open at the top; used chiefly for holding food or liquids;
brim, lip, rim - the top edge of a vessel or other container
bucket, pail - a roughly cylindrical vessel that is open at the top
censer, thurible - a container for burning incense (especially one that is swung on a chain in a religious ritual)
butter churn, churn - a vessel in which cream is agitated to separate butterfat from buttermilk
container - any object that can be used to hold things (especially a large metal boxlike object of standardized dimensions that can be loaded from one form of transport to another)
crucible, melting pot - a vessel made of material that does not melt easily; used for high temperature chemical reactions
drinking vessel - a vessel intended for drinking
metal drum, drum - a cylindrical metal container used for shipping or storage of liquids
eye cup, eyebath, eyecup - a small vessel with a rim curved to fit the orbit of the eye; use to apply medicated or cleansing solution to the eyeball; "an eyecup is called an eyebath in Britain"
flagon - a large metal or pottery vessel with a handle and spout; used to hold alcoholic beverages (usually wine)
jar - a vessel (usually cylindrical) with a wide mouth and without handles
ladle - a spoon-shaped vessel with a long handle; frequently used to transfer liquids from one container to another
ostensorium, monstrance - (Roman Catholic Church) a vessel (usually of gold or silver) in which the consecrated Host is exposed for adoration
mortar - a bowl-shaped vessel in which substances can be ground and mixed with a pestle
muller - a vessel in which wine is mulled
ewer, pitcher - an open vessel with a handle and a spout for pouring
poacher - a cooking vessel designed to poach food (such as fish or eggs)
pot - metal or earthenware cooking vessel that is usually round and deep; often has a handle and lid
retort - a vessel where substances are distilled or decomposed by heat
steeper - a vessel (usually a pot or vat) used for steeping
storage tank, tank - a large (usually metallic) vessel for holding gases or liquids
tin - a vessel (box, can, pan, etc.) made of tinplate and used mainly in baking
tub, vat - a large open vessel for holding or storing liquids
urceole - a vessel that holds water for washing the hands
water jacket - a container filled with water that surrounds a machine to cool it; especially that surrounding the cylinder block of an engine
well - a cavity or vessel used to contain liquid

vessel

noun
1. ship, boat, craft, barque (poetic) a Moroccan fishing vessel
2. container, receptacle, can, bowl, tank, pot, drum, barrel, butt, vat, bin, jar, basin, tub, jug, pitcher, urn, canister, repository, cask plastic storage vessels see boats and ships
Translations
سَفينَهوَعاء
loďnádobacéva
containerskib
alusastiasäiliö
edényhajótálvízi jármű
ílátskip
kuģis, laivatrauks
loďnádoba
krvna žilaplovilo
fartyg

vessel

[ˈvesl] N
1. (= ship) → barco m, buque m, embarcación f
2. (= receptacle) → vasija f, recipiente m
3. (Anat, Bot) → vaso m
see also blood B

vessel

[ˈvɛsəl] n
(ANATOMY)vaisseau m
(= ship) → vaisseau m
(= container) → récipient m

vessel

n
(Naut) → Schiff nt
(form: = receptacle) → Gefäß nt; drinking vesselTrinkgefäß nt
(Anat, Bot) → Gefäß nt

vessel

[ˈvɛsl] n (ship) → vascello, nave f; (container) → recipiente m (Anat) → vaso

vessel

(ˈvesl) noun
1. a container, usually for liquid. a plastic vessel containing acid.
2. a ship. a 10,000-ton grain-carrying vessel.

ves·sel

n. vaso, conducto o canal portador de un fluido tal como la sangre y la linfa;
blood ______ sanguíneo;
collateral ______ colateral;
great ___ -sgrandes ___ -s;
lymphatic ______ linfático.

vessel

n vaso; blood — vaso sanguíneo
References in periodicals archive ?
As more patients are indicated for surgery, it is important to ensure the highest level of conduit vessel quality through the use of next generation technology to further improve the surgeon's experience and patient outcomes.
A possible mechanism responsible for exercise training-mediated conduit vessel enlargement relates to the effect of repeated episodic increases in flow and shear stress related to systematic exercise training.
Under normal conditions, the elastic conduit vessels constitute a hydraulic buffer that acts to convert the intermittent cardiac output into steady flow that not only reduces cardiac workload during systole and conserves energy expenditure for the heart, but also alleviates pulsatile stress for the perfused organs.