confection


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con·fec·tion

 (kən-fĕk′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of confecting or the result of it: "These sentiments are not the confection of a consummate courtroom actor" (Ron Rosenbaum).
2. A sweet preparation, such as candy.
3. A sweetened medicinal compound; an electuary.
4. A piece displaying splendid craft, skill, and work: The gown was a confection of satin and applique.
tr.v. con·fec·tioned, con·fec·tion·ing, con·fec·tions
To make into a confection.

confection

(kənˈfɛkʃən)
n
1. the act or process of compounding or mixing
2. (Cookery) any sweet preparation of fruit, nuts, etc, such as a preserve or a sweet
3. (Clothing & Fashion) an elaborate article of clothing, esp for women
4. anything regarded as overelaborate or frivolous: the play was merely an ingenious confection.
5. (Pharmacology) a medicinal drug sweetened with sugar, honey, etc
[C14: from Old French, from Latin confectiō a preparing, from conficere to produce; see confect]

con•fec•tion

(kənˈfɛk ʃən)

n.
1. a sweet preparation, as a candy or preserve.
2. the process of confecting something.
3. something, as a book or play, regarded as frivolous, amusing, or contrived.
4. something made up or confected; concoction.
5. something, as a garment, that is very delicate or elaborate.
6. a medicinal preparation made with sugar, honey, or syrup.
v.t.
7. Archaic. to prepare as a confection.
[1300–50; Middle English < Latin]

Confection, Confectionery

 sweetmeats, pastry, etc.; a composition of a light nature, either musical of literary.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.confection - a food rich in sugar
dainty, goody, kickshaw, treat, delicacy - something considered choice to eat
confectionery - candy and other sweets considered collectively; "the business decided to concentrate on confectionery and soft drinks"
confiture - preserved or candied fruit
sweetmeat - a sweetened delicacy (as a preserve or pastry)
candy, confect - a rich sweet made of flavored sugar and often combined with fruit or nuts
hardbake - a British sweet made with molasses and butter and almonds
chewing gum, gum - a preparation (usually made of sweetened chicle) for chewing
candied apple, candy apple, caramel apple, taffy apple, toffee apple - an apple that is covered with a candy-like substance (usually caramelized sugar)
centre, center - the sweet central portion of a piece of candy that is enclosed in chocolate or some other covering
comfit - candy containing a fruit or nut
maraschino, maraschino cherry - cherry preserved in true or imitation maraschino liqueur
nonpareil - colored beads of sugar used as a topping on e.g. candies and cookies
2.confection - the act of creating something (a medicine or drink or soup etc.) by compounding or mixing a variety of components
creating from raw materials - the act of creating something that is different from the materials that went into it
Verb1.confection - make into a confection; "This medicine is home-confected"
assemble, put together, tack together, set up, piece, tack - create by putting components or members together; "She pieced a quilt"; "He tacked together some verses"; "They set up a committee"
Translations

confection

[kənˈfekʃən] N
1. (Culin) → dulce m, confite m
2. (= thing produced) → creacion f
3. (= manufacture) → confeccion f, hechura f

confection

[kənˈfɛkʃən] n
(= sweets) → sucrerie f
(= cakes) → patisserie f
(intricate creation)confection f

confection

n
(= sweets)Konfekt nt, → Zucker- or Naschwerk nt (old)
(Comm: = item of ladies’ clothing) → modischer Artikel; a charming little confection from Dioreine bezaubernde kleine Kreation von Dior
References in classic literature ?
Maclaren pressed them to taste his mutton-ham and "the wife's brose," reminding them the wife was out of Athole and had a name far and wide for her skill in that confection.
de Saint-Remy, my maitre d'hotel, who presided over the confection of that excellent daube truffee which your majesty seemed so much to appreciate.
California a constitution that was a confection of sin in a diction of