confines


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con·fines

 (kŏn′fīnz′)
pl.n.
1. The limits of a space or area; the borders: within the confines of one county.
2. Restraining elements: wanted to escape the confines of corporate politics.
3. Purview; scope: a theory that is well within the confines of science.

[Old French confins, boundaries, from Latin cōnfīnia, pl. of cōnfīnium, boundary, from cōnfīnis, adjoining : com-, com- + fīnis, border.]

confines

(ˈkɒnfaɪnz)
pl n
limits; boundaries
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.confines - a bounded scope; "he stayed within the confines of the city"
ambit, range, scope, reach, compass, orbit - an area in which something acts or operates or has power or control: "the range of a supersonic jet"; "a piano has a greater range than the human voice"; "the ambit of municipal legislation"; "within the compass of this article"; "within the scope of an investigation"; "outside the reach of the law"; "in the political orbit of a world power"
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Translations
حَدود
hranicepomezí
grænseramme
határok
mörk
hranice
hudutlarsınırlar

confines

[ˈkɒnfaɪnz] NPLconfines mpl, límites mpl

confines

[ˈkɒnfaɪnz] nplconfins mpl, limites fpl
within the confines of → dans les limites de

confines

[ˈkɒnfaɪnz] npl (bounds) → confini mpl

confine

(kənˈfain) verb
1. to keep within limits; to stop from spreading. They succeeded in confining the fire to a small area.
2. to shut up or imprison. The prince was confined in the castle for three years.
conˈfined adjective
1. (with to) kept in or shut up in. confined to bed with a cold.
2. narrow, small. a confined space.
conˈfinement noun
1. state of being shut up or imprisoned. solitary confinement.
2. (the time of) the birth of a child. her third confinement.
ˈconfines (ˈkon-) noun plural
limits or boundaries. within the confines of the city.
References in classic literature ?
They had recently seen a chosen army from that country, which, reverencing as a mother, they had blindly believed invincible--an army led by a chief who had been selected from a crowd of trained warriors, for his rare military endowments, disgracefully routed by a handful of French and Indians, and only saved from annihilation by the coolness and spirit of a Virginian boy, whose riper fame has since diffused itself, with the steady influence of moral truth, to the uttermost confines of Christendom.
The happy man inevitably confines himself within ancient limits.
For my part, I feel that with regard to Nature I live a sort of border life, on the confines of a world into which I make occasional and transient forays only, and my patriotism and allegiance to the state into whose territories I seem to retreat are those of a moss-trooper.
We made good time; and a couple of hours before sunset we stood upon the high confines of the Valley of Holiness, and our eyes swept it from end to end and noted its features.
Hear and obey: --You will immediately remove every trace of your offensive work from the Schiller monument; you pay a fine of ten thousand francs; you will suffer two years' imprisonment at hard labor; you will then be horsewhipped, tarred and feathered, deprived of your ears, ridden on a rail to the confines of the canton, and banished forever.
Still you are miserable; for hope has quitted you on the very confines of life: your sun at noon darkens in an eclipse, which you feel will not leave it till the time of setting.
Having reached this stage of the explanation, and having purposely skirted, as it were, round the confines of truth, in the event of the housekeeper's curiosity leading her to make any private inquiries on the subject of Mrs.
It was known directly, to the furthest confines of the crowd.
I bought an approved scheme of the noble art and mystery of stenography (which cost me ten and sixpence); and plunged into a sea of perplexity that brought me, in a few weeks, to the confines of distraction.
Well have ye judg'd, well ended long debate, Synod of Gods, and like to what ye are, Great things resolv'd; which from the lowest deep Will once more lift us up, in spight of Fate, Neerer our ancient Seat; perhaps in view Of those bright confines, whence with neighbouring Arms And opportune excursion we may chance Re-enter Heav'n; or else in some milde Zone Dwell not unvisited of Heav'ns fair Light Secure, and at the brightning Orient beam Purge off this gloom; the soft delicious Air, To heal the scarr of these corrosive Fires Shall breath her balme.
The emperor had not only written to him, but had sent a Moor and Portuguese as his ambassadors, to secure us a kind reception; these in their way to this prince had come through the countries of Chumo-Salamay and Senaa, the utmost confines of Abyssinia, and had carried thither the emperor's orders concerning our passage.
When the author of this great history comes to relate what is set down in this chapter he says he would have preferred to pass it over in silence, fearing it would not he believed, because here Don Quixote's madness reaches the confines of the greatest that can be conceived, and even goes a couple of bowshots beyond the greatest.