confiscation


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Related to confiscation: Confiscation of property

con·fis·cate

 (kŏn′fĭ-skāt′)
tr.v. con·fis·cat·ed, con·fis·cat·ing, con·fis·cates
1. To seize (private property) for the public treasury, especially as a penalty for wrongdoing.
2. To seize by authority: The teacher confiscated all the comic books we had in class. See Synonyms at appropriate.
adj. (kŏn′fĭ-skāt′, kən-fĭs′kət)
1. Seized by a government; appropriated.
2. Having lost property through confiscation.

[Latin cōnfiscāre, cōnfiscāt : com-, com- + fiscus, treasury.]

con′fis·ca′tion n.
con′fis·ca′tor n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.confiscation - seizure by the governmentconfiscation - seizure by the government    
seizure - the taking possession of something by legal process
expropriation - taking out of an owner's hands (especially taking property by public authority)

confiscation

noun seizure, appropriation, impounding, forfeiture, expropriation, sequestration, takeover Anyone convicted of drug trafficking would be liable to confiscation of assets and imprisonment.

confiscation

noun
The act of taking quick and forcible possession of:
Translations
مُصادَرَه
konfiskacezabavení
konfiskering
konfisko
elkobzás
upptaka
konfiškácia
el koyma

confiscation

[ˌkɒnfɪsˈkeɪʃən] Nconfiscación f, incautación f

confiscation

[ˌkɒnfɪˈskeɪʃən] nconfiscation f

confiscation

confiscation

[ˌkɒnfɪsˈkeɪʃn] nconfisca

confiscate

(ˈkonfiskeit) verb
to seize or take (something) away, usually as a penalty. The teacher confiscated the boy's comic which he was reading in class.
ˌconfiˈscation noun
References in classic literature ?
During the Revolution, the Pyncheon of that epoch, adopting the royal side, became a refugee; but repented, and made his reappearance, just at the point of time to preserve the House of the Seven Gables from confiscation.
The penalty of refusal or avoidance was confiscation.
Again: those nobles who had seen the coming storm in time, and anticipating plunder or confiscation, had made provident remittances to Tellson's, were always to be heard of there by their needy brethren.
The daroga was let off with the loss of the imperial favor, the confiscation of his property and an order of perpetual banishment.
Would not the prospect of a total indemnity for all the preliminary steps be a greater temptation to undertake and persevere in an enterprise against the public liberty, than the mere prospect of an exemption from death and confiscation, if the final execution of the design, upon an actual appeal to arms, should miscarry?
Confiscation of the property of all emigrants and rebels.
While, however, he discharged his functions with credit and fidelity, Marmaduke never seemed to lose sight of his own interests; for, when the estates of the adherents of the crown fell under the hammer, by the acts of confiscation, he appeared in New York, and became the purchaser of extensive possessions at comparatively low prices.
The worst that can happen to us is the confiscation of our merchandise.
Now it is the proper business of the public assembly to determine concerning war and peace, making or breaking off alliances, to enact laws, to sentence to death, banishment, or confiscation of goods, and to call the magistrates to account for their behaviour when in office.
There is not, among the most religious and instructed men of the most religious and civil nations, a reliance on the moral sentiment and a sufficient belief in the unity of things, to persuade them that society can be maintained without artificial restraints, as well as the solar system; or that the private citizen might be reasonable and a good neighbor, without the hint of a jail or a confiscation.
Cornelius was a scholar, and was wealthy, -- at least he had been before the confiscation of his property; Cornelius belonged to the merchant-bourgeoisie, who were prouder of their richly emblazoned shop signs than the hereditary nobility of their heraldic bearings.
The aggressor, moreover, lost caste in the estimation of his equals and this was considered by the British as of more consequence than the confiscation of his land.