conflation


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

con·flate

 (kən-flāt′)
tr.v. con·flat·ed, con·flat·ing, con·flates
1. To bring together; meld or fuse: "The problems [with the biopic] include ... dates moved around, lovers deleted, many characters conflated into one" (Ty Burr).
2. To combine (two variant texts, for example) into one whole.
3. To fail to distinguish between; confuse. See Usage Note below.

[Latin cōnflāre, cōnflāt- : com-, com- + flāre, to blow; see bhlē- in Indo-European roots.]

con·fla′tion n.
Usage Note: Traditionally, conflate means "To bring together; meld or fuse," as in the sentence I have trouble differentiating Jane Austen's heroines; I realized I had conflated Elizabeth Bennet and Emma Woodhouse into a single character in my mind. In our 2015 survey, 87 percent of the Usage Panelists accepted this traditional usage. Recently, a new sense for conflate has emerged, meaning "To mistake one thing for another," as if it were a synonym for confuse. In 2015, our usage panelists found this new sense to be marginally acceptable, with 55 percent accepting the sentence People often conflate the national debt with the federal deficit; when the senator talked about reducing the debt, he was actually referring to the deficit.

con•fla•tion

(kənˈfleɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the process or result of fusing items into one entity; fusion; amalgamation.
2. a text formed by combining two variant texts.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin]
Translations

conflation

[kənˈfleɪʃən] Ncombinación f

conflation

References in periodicals archive ?
The opening image reveals the conflation of beauty and ugliness as seen in the desolation and wreck--The age as shown on Dupont Street.
He may be confusing the issue with the 2005 Treaty of Lisbon and the promise by Gordon Brown to hold a referendum and his subsequent refusal on the grounds that it was not a new treaty but a conflation of previous agreements into one document.
There is conflation between politics and Islam and this led to distort the pure image of Islam and its concepts" Hadi added, emphasizing that Muslims lack to tolerance and fraternity to put an end to conflicts.
In style, the book owes much to the urbane and knowing surrealism of Borges, and the urgency and elan of magical realism, with fantastic situations and events taken at face value as part of the fabric of everyday life: the Dean transforms into a great white bird and carries a group of gypsies across the mountains; the Dean of Conflation reveals to Thomas the bizarre metaphysics of the Activated Eye.
For use by archivists and librarians, this selection of correspondence by McQuaid, the Archbishop of Dublin between 1940 and 1972, seeks to illustrate the conflation of McQuaid's generous private and vicious public lives.
According to the report, Brown told the Leveson Inquiry that The Sun was guilty of 'the conflation of fact and opinion' in its coverage of the Afghanistan conflict and of his premiership.
Examining a small number of pertinent works, Adams exposes the American citizen's conflation of war with manhood, the wider American cultural paradigm that enables the mythologized equivalence between these two terms, and most stolidly, the disjuncture between civilian perceptions of war's relationship with masculinity and the disruptive narratives his examined texts offer to counter these popular perceptions.
David Yates' hugely entertaining film builds relentlessly to the final battle at Hogwarts, which is brilliantly realised with a seamless conflation of live action and dazzling digital trickery.
and an upper house without hereditary peers but this conflates 'democracy' with a constitution in which all participants are elected, a rather dubious conflation.
The discussion has been confused by a conflation of two things.
The appointment of the well-regarded man and manager Roy Hodgson is the acceptable conflation of business and football interests.
COP OUT (1hr 47 mins) Certificate: Starring: Morgan, Ana Director: Star rating: The screen chemistry between actors Bruce Willis, as veteran detective Jimmy Monroe, and Tracy Morgan, as partner Paul Hodges, is inert, and the conflation of crime thriller and buddy comedy doesn't quite gel.