conformist

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con·form·ist

 (kən-fôr′mĭst)
n.
A person who uncritically or habitually conforms to the customs, rules, or styles of a group.
adj.
Marked by conformity or convention: "Underneath the image, teenagers today are surprisingly conformist" (Selina S. Guber).

con·form′ism n.

conformist

(kənˈfɔːmɪst)
n
1. a person who adopts the attitudes, behaviour, dress, etc of the group to which he belongs
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a person who complies with the practices of an established church, esp the Church of England
adj
of a conforming nature or character

con•form•ist

(kənˈfɔr mɪst)

n.
1. a person who conforms, esp. unquestioningly, to the usual practices or standards of a group, society, etc.
2. (often cap.) a person who conforms to the usages of an established church, esp. the Church of England.
adj.
3. of or characterized by conforming, esp. in action or appearance.
[1625–35]
con•form′ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conformist - someone who conforms to established standards of conduct (especially in religious matters)
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
conservative, conservativist - a person who is reluctant to accept changes and new ideas
recusant, nonconformist - someone who refuses to conform to established standards of conduct
Adj.1.conformist - marked by convention and conformity to customs or rules or styles; "underneath the radical image teenagers are surprisingly conformist"
nonconformist, unconformist - not conforming to some norm or socially approved pattern of behavior or thought; "their rabidly nonconformist deportment has made them legendary"; "the old stubborn nonconformist spirit of the early settlers"
2.conformist - adhering to established customs or doctrines (especially in religion)
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
orthodox - adhering to what is commonly accepted; "an orthodox view of the world"

conformist

noun traditionalist, conservative, reactionary, Babbitt (U.S.), stickler, yes man, stick-in-the-mud (informal), conventionalist He's described as a conformist, an orthodox member of his party.

conformist

adjective
Conforming to established practice or standards:
Slang: square.
Translations

conformist

[kənˈfɔːmɪst]
A. ADJconformista
B. Nconformista mf

conformist

[kənˈfɔːrmɪst] n
(gen)conformiste mf
(RELIGION)conformiste mf

conformist

nKonformist m (also Brit Eccl)

conformist

[kənˈfɔːmɪst]
1. adjconformistico/a
2. nconformista m/f
References in periodicals archive ?
Kaufman skillfully weaves into his narration of these events their reception by Catholics, reformists, and conformists identifiable through sermons and printed texts.
Diane makes a formal complaint against Sabrina to the Non Conformists.
A companion to the art exhibition, GULAG: Soviet Forced Labor Camps and the Struggle for Freedom, this volume documents the work of seven contemporary artists representing two generations of non- conformists born during the Stalin and Kruschev eras grappling the history and mythology of the gulags.
Many saw the bishops' authority for subscription and deprivation as contrary to common law, because a clergyman's livelihood was his own property, but conformists countered that argument with the assertion that the historical ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the church was ancient and thus had primacy.
BM programs, however, are secular exercises in tearing down willful personalities and re-casting them as conformists.
Much like people, chimpanzees are inveterate conformists whose copycat tendencies enable them to develop cultural traditions, a new study suggests.
In an article in Sweden's Axess Magazine, William Strauss and Nell Howe, generational studies gurus and authors of Millennials Rising, call today's young adults "America's new conformists," observing that they "believe in security rather than radicalism, political order rather than social emancipation, collective responsibility rather than personal expression.
It's saying, 'Really in their hearts, people aren't conformists,' when quite the opposite is true.
Darrell's exorcisms highlight the process of the creation "of orthodoxy in the Church of England through the struggles between conformists and dissidents" (35).
The exhibition confusingly, but quite rightly, shows the work of both the conformists and the rebels in the same rooms, almost without comment.