confront


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con·front

 (kən-frŭnt′)
v. con·front·ed, con·front·ing, con·fronts
v.tr.
1. To come face to face with, especially with defiance or hostility: I wish to confront my accuser in a court of law.
2. To bring face to face with: The defendant was confronted with incontrovertible evidence of guilt.
3. To come up against; encounter: confronted danger at every turn.
v.intr.
To engage in confrontation: "She got no child support. [She] didn't argue or confront" (Gail Sheehy).

[French confronter, from Old French, to adjoin, from Medieval Latin cōnfrontāre : Latin com-, com- + Latin frōns, front-, front.]

con·front′er n.
con·front′ment n.
con′fron·ta′tive adj.

confront

(kənˈfrʌnt)
vb (tr)
1. (usually foll by with) to present or face (with something), esp in order to accuse or criticize
2. to face boldly; oppose in hostility
3. to be face to face with; be in front of
4. to bring together for comparison
[C16: from Medieval Latin confrontārī to stand face to face with, from frons forehead]
conˈfronter n

con•front

(kənˈfrʌnt)

v.t.
1. to face in hostility or defiance; oppose.
2. to set face to face: They confronted him with the evidence.
3. to stand or come in front of; meet face to face.
4. to encounter as something to be dealt with: the obstacles that confronted us.
5. to bring together for examination or comparison.
[1595–1605; < Medieval Latin confrontārī= Latin con- con- + -frontārī, derivative of Latin frōns forehead, front]
con•front′al, n.
con•front′er, n.

confront


Past participle: confronted
Gerund: confronting

Imperative
confront
confront
Present
I confront
you confront
he/she/it confronts
we confront
you confront
they confront
Preterite
I confronted
you confronted
he/she/it confronted
we confronted
you confronted
they confronted
Present Continuous
I am confronting
you are confronting
he/she/it is confronting
we are confronting
you are confronting
they are confronting
Present Perfect
I have confronted
you have confronted
he/she/it has confronted
we have confronted
you have confronted
they have confronted
Past Continuous
I was confronting
you were confronting
he/she/it was confronting
we were confronting
you were confronting
they were confronting
Past Perfect
I had confronted
you had confronted
he/she/it had confronted
we had confronted
you had confronted
they had confronted
Future
I will confront
you will confront
he/she/it will confront
we will confront
you will confront
they will confront
Future Perfect
I will have confronted
you will have confronted
he/she/it will have confronted
we will have confronted
you will have confronted
they will have confronted
Future Continuous
I will be confronting
you will be confronting
he/she/it will be confronting
we will be confronting
you will be confronting
they will be confronting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been confronting
you have been confronting
he/she/it has been confronting
we have been confronting
you have been confronting
they have been confronting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been confronting
you will have been confronting
he/she/it will have been confronting
we will have been confronting
you will have been confronting
they will have been confronting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been confronting
you had been confronting
he/she/it had been confronting
we had been confronting
you had been confronting
they had been confronting
Conditional
I would confront
you would confront
he/she/it would confront
we would confront
you would confront
they would confront
Past Conditional
I would have confronted
you would have confronted
he/she/it would have confronted
we would have confronted
you would have confronted
they would have confronted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.confront - oppose, as in hostility or a competition; "You must confront your opponent"; "Jackson faced Smith in the boxing ring"; "The two enemies finally confronted each other"
front, breast - confront bodily; "breast the storm"
take the bull by the horns - face a difficulty and grapple with it without avoiding it
encounter, take on, meet, play - contend against an opponent in a sport, game, or battle; "Princeton plays Yale this weekend"; "Charlie likes to play Mary"
pit, play off, oppose, match - set into opposition or rivalry; "let them match their best athletes against ours"; "pit a chess player against the Russian champion"; "He plays his two children off against each other"
2.confront - deal with (something unpleasant) head on; "You must confront your problems"; "He faced the terrible consequences of his mistakes"
confront, face, present - present somebody with something, usually to accuse or criticize; "We confronted him with the evidence"; "He was faced with all the evidence and could no longer deny his actions"; "An enormous dilemma faces us"
go about, set about, approach - begin to deal with; "approach a task"; "go about a difficult problem"; "approach a new project"
tackle, undertake, take on - accept as a challenge; "I'll tackle this difficult task"
avoid - stay clear from; keep away from; keep out of the way of someone or something; "Her former friends now avoid her"
3.confront - present somebody with something, usually to accuse or criticize; "We confronted him with the evidence"; "He was faced with all the evidence and could no longer deny his actions"; "An enormous dilemma faces us"
face, face up, confront - deal with (something unpleasant) head on; "You must confront your problems"; "He faced the terrible consequences of his mistakes"
4.confront - be face to face with; "The child screamed when he confronted the man in the Halloween costume"
front, face, look - be oriented in a certain direction, often with respect to another reference point; be opposite to; "The house looks north"; "My backyard look onto the pond"; "The building faces the park"

confront

verb
1. tackle, deal with, cope with, brave, beard, face up to, meet head-on We are learning how to confront death.
2. trouble, face, afflict, perplex, perturb, bedevil the environmental crisis which confronts us all
3. challenge, face, oppose, tackle, encounter, defy, call out, stand up to, come face to face with, accost, face off (slang) She pushed her way through the mob and confronted him face to face.
challenge, flee, dodge, evade, sidestep, circumvent, body-swerve (Scot.), give a wide berth to, keep or steer clear of

confront

verb
1. To meet face-to-face, especially defiantly:
2. To come up against:
Translations
يُجابِه، يَتَصَدّىيُواجِه
čelitkonfrontovatstát před
konfrontere
kohdata
szembesít
horfast í augu viîmæta, standa andspænis
konfrontacijapateiktisuvesti į akistatą
atrasties pretīkonfrontētnostādīt aci pret acisadurties
konfrontovať
karşı karşıya gelmekyüzleştirmek

confront

[kənˈfrʌnt] VT (= face squarely) → hacer frente a; (= face defiantly) → enfrentarse con
to confront sb with sthconfrontar a algn con algo
to confront sb with the factsexponer delante de algn los hechos
the problems which confront uslos problemas con los que nos enfrentamos
we were confronted by the riverestábamos delante el río

confront

[kənˈfrʌnt] vt
(= face, tackle) [+ person, enemy] → affronter, faire face à; [+ issue, question] → faire face à; [+ danger] → affronter, faire face à
to be confronted with sth [+ problem, situation, choice] → être confronté(e) à qch
(= accuse) to confront sb with sth [+ evidence, facts] → mettre qn en face de qch
She had decided to confront him with what she had learnt → Elle avait décidé de le mettre en face de ce qu'elle avait appris.
to confront sb about sth → affronter qn sur qch, attaquer qn sur qch

confront

vt
(= face) danger, enemy, the bossgegenübertreten (+dat); (fig) problems, issue alsobegegnen (+dat); (= stand or be confronting) wall of ice etcgegenüberstehen (+dat); (problems, decisions)sich stellen (+dat)
(= bring face to face with)konfrontieren; to confront somebody with somebody/somethingjdn jdm gegenüberstellen, jdn mit jdm/etw konfrontieren; to be confronted with somethingmit etw konfrontiert sein, vor etw (dat)stehen; (when) confronted withangesichts (+gen)

confront

[kənˈfrʌnt] vt (enemy, danger) → affrontare; (defiantly) → fronteggiare
to confront sb with sth → mettere qn a confronto con qc
the problems which confront us → i problemi da affrontare

confront

(kənˈfrant) verb
1. to bring face to face with. He was confronted with the evidence of his crime.
2. to face in a hostile manner; to oppose. They confronted the enemy at dawn.
ˌconfronˈtation (kon-) noun

confront

vt. confrontar.

confront

vt enfrentar, afrontar, confrontar, hacer frente a; to confront our fears..enfrentar nuestros temores
References in classic literature ?
No ghostly worn-out figure should confront Tom Willard, but something quite unexpected and startling.
he cried, opening the hall door, to confront a bald-headed man who stood peering at our hero with bright snapping eyes, like those of some big bird spying out the land from afar.
She disappeared into her work-room with the vest, leaving me to confront the Pole, who stood against the door like a wooden figure.
And especially now, while, with her crested teaspoons and antique china, she was flattering herself with ideas of gentility, she felt an unspeakable disinclination to confront a customer.
It were fairer to confront the accused with the accuser.
I will confront my fate like a man and a Frenchman.
Having issued this mandate with as much potentiality as if she had been a recognized authority in the house ever since it had been a house, and having looked out to confront the amazed Peggotty coming along the passage with a candle at the sound of a strange voice, Miss Betsey shut the door again, and sat down as before: with her feet on the fender, the skirt of her dress tucked up, and her hands folded on one knee.
I always thought this was business, this was the way to confront the thing, this was the way to take the foe by the throat.
I want to have them to confront her with, when I do find her.
Her half cajoling, half mocking air, and her ready smile, were difficult to confront with severity; and Miss Wilson knew it; for she would not look at her even when attracted by a convulsive start and an angry side glance from Miss Lindsay, who had just been indented between the ribs by a finger tip.
I felt willing rather to starve at sea than to confront such perils.
There was no doubt but he became his years, breathing, as he did, of wealth and consideration; and it was a surprising contrast to see our parlour sot - bald, dirty, pimpled, and robed in his old camlet cloak - confront him at the bottom of the stairs.