congregation


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con·gre·ga·tion

 (kŏng′grĭ-gā′shən)
n.
1. The act of assembling.
2. A body of assembled people or things; a gathering.
3.
a. A group of people gathered for religious worship.
b. The members of a specific religious group who regularly worship at a church or synagogue.
4. Roman Catholic Church
a. A religious institute in which only simple vows, not solemn vows, are taken.
b. A division of the Curia.

congregation

(ˌkɒŋɡrɪˈɡeɪʃən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a group of persons gathered for worship, prayer, etc, esp in a church or chapel
2. the act of congregating or collecting together
3. a group of people, objects, etc, collected together; assemblage
4. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the group of persons habitually attending a given church, chapel, etc
5. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church
a. a society of persons who follow a common rule of life but who are bound only by simple vows
b. Also called: dicastery an administrative subdivision of the papal curia
c. an administrative committee of bishops for arranging the business of a general council
6. (Education) chiefly Brit an assembly of senior members of a university

con•gre•ga•tion

(ˌkɒŋ grɪˈgeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an assembly of people brought together or regularly meeting together for common religious worship.
2. the act of congregating or the state of being congregated.
3. a gathered or assembled body; assemblage.
4. an organization for providing church services; a local church society.
5. (in the Old Testament) the people of Israel.
6. (in the New Testament) the Christian Church.
7. (in Roman Catholicism)
a. a committee of cardinals or other ecclesiastics.
b. a community of men or women, either with or without vows, observing a common rule.
[1300–50; < Anglo-French < Latin]

Congregation

 an assembly of persons or things; a group of religious persons under a common rule; the Christian Church collectively; those attending a religious service. See also community, confession.
Examples: congregation of holy apostles, 1526; of gaseous atoms, 1883; of birds; of cardinals; of elves, 1809; of fish, 1865; of goods; of hypocrites, 1611; of holy maidens; of monasteries [e.g., Congregation of Cluny]; of oyster and scallop shells, 1717; of people, 1486; of plovers, 1430; of princes, 1539; of fine qualities, 1878; of saints, 1535; of soldiers, 1598; of vapour, 1602; of water, 1526; of winds; of worshippers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.congregation - a group of people who adhere to a common faith and habitually attend a given churchcongregation - a group of people who adhere to a common faith and habitually attend a given church
social group - people sharing some social relation
flock - a church congregation guided by a pastor
denomination - a group of religious congregations having its own organization and a distinctive faith
2.congregation - an assemblage of people or animals or things collected together; "a congregation of children pleaded for his autograph"; "a great congregation of birds flew over"
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
3.congregation - the act of congregating
gathering, assemblage, assembly - the social act of assembling; "they demanded the right of assembly"

congregation

noun parishioners, host, brethren, crowd, assembly, parish, flock, fellowship, multitude, throng, laity Most members of the congregation arrive a few minutes before the service.

congregation

noun
A number of persons who have come or been gathered together:
Informal: get-together.
Translations
مَجْمَع، جَماعَةُ المُصَلّين
kongregaceshromáždění
forsamlingmenighed
gyülekezet
mann-/kirkjusöfnuîur
kongregácia

congregation

[ˌkɒŋgrɪˈgeɪʃən] N
1. (Rel) → fieles mpl, feligreses mpl
2. (= assembly) → reunión f

congregation

[ˌkɒŋgrɪˈgeɪʃən] nassemblée f (des fidèles)

congregation

n
Versammlung f; (not planned) → Ansammlung f; (= people in cities etc)Zusammenballung f
(Eccl) → Gemeinde f; (of cardinals)Kongregation f

congregation

[ˌkɒŋgrɪˈgeɪʃn] n (worshippers) → assemblea (dei fedeli); (parishioners) → parrocchiani mpl, congregazione f

congregate

(ˈkoŋgrigeit) verb
to come or bring together. A large crowd congregated in the street.
ˌcongreˈgation noun
a group gathered together, especially people in a church for a service, or belonging to a church. The minister visited all the members of his congregation.
References in classic literature ?
He talked to his congregation and in his talk said that it was a mistake for people to think of their minister as a man set aside and intended by nature to lead a blameless life.
Maule's Lane, or Pyncheon Street, as it were now more decorous to call it, was thronged, at the appointed hour, as with a congregation on its way to church.
People say," said another, "that the Reverend Master Dimmesdale, her godly pastor, takes it very grievously to heart that such a scandal should have come upon his congregation.
I only sat there on my tomb and read into what my little friend had said to me the fullness of its meaning; by the time I had grasped the whole of which I had also embraced, for absence, the pretext that I was ashamed to offer my pupils and the rest of the congregation such an example of delay.
Entering, I found a small scattered congregation of sailors, and sailors' wives and widows.
even while living) in the congregation of the dead.
Then she rose--and all the congregation stood while she walked down the aisle.
The congregation being fully assembled, now, the bell rang once more, to warn laggards and stragglers, and then a solemn hush fell upon the church which was only broken by the tittering and whispering of the choir in the gallery.
His congregation up to Parsonsfield clubbed together and give him that gold watch he carries; I s'pose he'd 'a' handed that over too, only heathens always tell time by the sun 'n' don't need watches.
Led by her, I passed from compartment to compartment, from passage to passage, of a large and irregular building; till, emerging from the total and somewhat dreary silence pervading that portion of the house we had traversed, we came upon the hum of many voices, and presently entered a wide, long room, with great deal tables, two at each end, on each of which burnt a pair of candles, and seated all round on benches, a congregation of girls of every age, from nine or ten to twenty.
All day had been flooding with rain; we could not go to church, so Joseph must needs get up a congregation in the garret; and, while Hindley and his wife basked downstairs before a comfortable fire - doing anything but reading their Bibles, I'll answer for it - Heathcliff, myself, and the unhappy ploughboy were commanded to take our prayer-books, and mount: we were ranged in a row, on a sack of corn, groaning and shivering, and hoping that Joseph would shiver too, so that he might give us a short homily for his own sake.
Kirke's sister and her children were staying with a friend at Aldborough, and Kirke's sister was one of the congregation.

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