conifer


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con·i·fer

 (kŏn′ə-fər, kō′nə-)
n.
Any of various mostly needle-leaved or scale-leaved, chiefly evergreen, cone-bearing gymnospermous trees or shrubs of the order Coniferales, such as pines, spruces, and firs.

[Latin cōnifer, cone-bearing : cōnus, cone (from Greek kōnos; see kō- in Indo-European roots) + -fer, -fer.]

co·nif′er·ous (kō-nĭf′ər-əs, kə-) adj.

conifer

(ˈkəʊnɪfə; ˈkɒn-)
n
(Plants) any gymnosperm tree or shrub of the phylum Coniferophyta, typically bearing cones and evergreen leaves. The group includes the pines, spruces, firs, larches, yews, junipers, cedars, cypresses, and sequoias
[C19: from Latin, from cōnus cone + ferre to bear]

co•ni•fer

(ˈkoʊ nə fər, ˈkɒn ə-)

n.
any of a class, Pinopsida, of chiefly evergreen trees and shrubs, as those of the pine and cypress families, that bear both seeds and pollen on dry scales arranged as a cone.
[1350–1400; Middle English conefere < Latin cōnifer coniferous =cōn(us) cone + -i- + -fer -fer]
co•nif•er•ous (koʊˈnɪf ər əs, kə-) adj.

con·i·fer

(kŏn′ə-fər)
Any of various trees or shrubs that bear cones. Conifers are dependent on the wind to blow pollen produced by the male cones to the female cones, where seeds develop. Conifers are usually evergreen, often have needle-shaped or scale-like leaves, and include the pine, fir, spruce, hemlock, and yew. See Note at pollination.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conifer - any gymnospermous tree or shrub bearing conesconifer - any gymnospermous tree or shrub bearing cones
pine, pine tree, true pine - a coniferous tree
larch tree, larch - any of numerous conifers of the genus Larix all having deciduous needlelike leaves
golden larch, Pseudolarix amabilis - Chinese deciduous conifer resembling a larch with golden yellow leaves
fir tree, true fir, fir - any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abies; chiefly of upland areas
true cedar, cedar tree, cedar - any cedar of the genus Cedrus
spruce - any coniferous tree of the genus Picea
hemlock tree, hemlock - an evergreen tree
douglas fir - tall evergreen timber tree of western North America having resinous wood and short needles
Cathaya - Chinese evergreen conifer discovered in 1955; not yet cultivated elsewhere
cedar, cedar tree - any of numerous trees of the family Cupressaceae that resemble cedars
cypress tree, cypress - any of numerous evergreen conifers of the genus Cupressus of north temperate regions having dark scalelike leaves and rounded cones
Athrotaxis selaginoides, King William pine - evergreen of Tasmanian mountains having sharp-pointed leaves that curve inward
dawn redwood, metasequoia, Metasequoia glyptostrodoides - large fast-growing Chinese monoecious tree having flat bright-green deciduous leaves and small globular cones; commonly cultivated in United States as an ornamental; known as a fossil before being discovered in China
arborvitae - any of several Asian and North American conifers of the genera Thuja and Thujopsis
keteleeria - Asiatic conifers resembling firs
Wollemi pine - newly discovered (1994) pine thought to have been long extinct; Australia; genus and species names not yet assigned
araucaria - any of several tall South American or Australian trees with large cones and edible seeds
dammar pine, kauri pine - any of various trees of the genus Agathis; yield dammar resin
plum-yew - any of several evergreen trees and shrubs of eastern Asia resembling yew and having large seeds enclosed in a fleshy envelope; sometimes cultivated as ornamentals
celery pine - Australasian evergreen conifer having a graceful head of foliage resembling celery that is composed of phyllodes borne in the axils of scalelike leaves
podocarp - any evergreen in the southern hemisphere of the genus Podocarpus having a pulpy fruit with one hard seed
Podocarpus coriaceus, yacca, yacca podocarp - West Indian evergreen with medium to long leaves
brown pine, Podocarpus elatus, Rockingham podocarp - large Australian tree with straight-grained yellow wood that turns brown on exposure
African yellowwood, cape yellowwood, Podocarpus elongatus - South African tree or shrub having a rounded crown
Podocarpus totara, totara - valuable timber tree of New Zealand yielding hard reddish wood used for furniture and bridges and wharves
Dacrycarpus dacrydioides, kahikatea, New Zealand Dacryberry, New Zealand white pine, Podocarpus dacrydioides - New Zealand evergreen valued for its light easily worked wood
Dacrydium cupressinum, imou pine, red pine, rimu - tall New Zealand timber tree
Dacrydium colensoi, tarwood, tar-wood - New Zealand silver pine of conical habit with long slender flexuous branches; adapted to cold wet summers and high altitudes
common sickle pine, Falcatifolium falciforme - small tropical rain forest tree of Indonesia and Malaysia
Falcatifolium taxoides, yellow-leaf sickle pine - a rain forest tree or shrub of New Caledonia having a conic crown and pale green sickle-shaped leaves; host species for the rare parasite yew
Lagarostrobus colensoi, silver pine, westland pine - timber tree of New Zealand having shiny white wood
Dacrydium franklinii, huon pine, Lagarostrobus franklinii - Tasmanian timber tree with yellow aromatic wavy-grained wood used for carving and ship building; sometimes placed in genus Dacrydium
Nageia nagi, nagi - medium-sized tree having glossy lanceolate leaves; southern China to Taiwan and southern Japan
miro, Podocarpus ferruginea, Prumnopitys ferruginea, black pine - New Zealand conifer used for lumber; the dark wood is used for interior carpentry
Translations
شَجَرَه تَحْمِلُ ثمارا مَخْروطِيَّهصَنَوْبَرِيَّة
jehličnanjehličnatý strom/keř
nåletræ
havupuu
crnogorica
tûlevelû
barrtré
針葉樹
구과 식물
spygliuotis
skuju koks
konifera
barrträd
ต้นสน
kozalakkozalaklı ağaç
cây lá kim

conifer

[ˈkɒnɪfəʳ] Nconífera f

conifer

[ˈkɒnɪr] n (= tree) → conifère m

conifer

nNadelbaum m, → Konifere f (spec); conifersNadelhölzer pl

conifer

[ˈkɒnɪfəʳ] nconifera

conifer

(ˈkonifə) , ((American) ˈka-) noun
a cone-bearing tree, eg the fir. The larch tree is a conifer.
coˈniferous adjective
cone-bearing.

conifer

صَنَوْبَرِيَّة jehličnan nåletræ Nadelbaum κωνοφόρο conífera havupuu conifère crnogorica conifera 針葉樹 구과 식물 naaldboom bartre drzewo iglaste conífera хвойное дерево barrträd ต้นสน kozalak cây lá kim 针叶树
References in classic literature ?
For a moment--only for a moment--when they were in the turning of the drive, between the tall rhododendrons and conifers, before the lodge became visible, he inclined his face towards her as if--but, no: he thought better of it, and let her go.
From the high ground on which it stood a series of terraces bordered by balustrades and urns descended in the steel-engraving style to a small irregular lake with an asphalt edge overhung by rare weeping conifers.
They had the appearance of old sea cliffs; here and there were small clumps of conifers, and in two places tall cascades.
More often than not, if a conifer pops up in public, it's another news story about a fast-growing leylandii blocking someone's view.
Under the Plan it, Plant it this Autumn' campaign, National Conifer Week, which takes place September 29 to October 7, aims to change perceptions of conifers and give them the recognition they deserve.
The Western Conifer Seed Bug is slimmer than the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, and has a white zig-zag line across the center of its body.
However, the macrostructure of the conifer genome has been remarkably stable over the ages," adds the professor from the Universite Laval Faculty of Forestry, Geography, and Geomatics.
Many conifer plantations which have been planted since the Second World War are approaching maturity and due to be felled.
A RARE Australian conifer, described as 'a living fossil' has set seed for the first time in Wales.
2 If the conifer is brown at the base, plant variegated ivy at the base which will use the brown, lower branches as a climbing frame.
Expert tip: Download the free Conifer Look Book and Easy Guide To Growing Conifers from the Association of British Conifer Growers (www.
An essential reference for botanists and anyone working with trees and forests, this impressive work is also gracefully written, with succinct but detailed entries describing the traits of each conifer, the morphology of its parts, its size and habitat, with precise descriptions of the buds, needles, pollen cones, seed cones, bract blades, seed body, and other parts as applicable.