conjecture


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Related to conjecture: Hodge conjecture

con·jec·ture

 (kən-jĕk′chər)
n.
1. Opinion or judgment based on inconclusive or incomplete evidence; guesswork.
2. An opinion or conclusion based on guesswork: The commentators made various conjectures about the outcome of the next election.
v. con·jec·tured, con·jec·tur·ing, con·jec·tures
v.tr.
To judge or conclude by conjecture; guess: "From the comparative silence below ... I conjectured that Mr Rochester was now at liberty" (Charlotte Brontë).
v.intr.
To make a conjecture.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin coniectūra, from coniectus, past participle of conicere, to infer : com-, com- + iacere, to throw; see yē- in Indo-European roots.]

con·jec′tur·a·ble adj.
con·jec′tur·al adj.
con·jec′tur·al·ly adv.
con·jec′tur·er n.

conjecture

(kənˈdʒɛktʃə)
n
1. the formation of conclusions from incomplete evidence; guess
2. the inference or conclusion so formed
3. (Alternative Belief Systems) obsolete interpretation of occult signs
vb
to infer or arrive at (an opinion, conclusion, etc) from incomplete evidence
[C14: from Latin conjectūra an assembling of facts, from conjicere to throw together, from jacere to throw]
conˈjecturable adj
conˈjecturably adv
conˈjecturer n

con•jec•ture

(kənˈdʒɛk tʃər)

n., v. -tured, -tur•ing. n.
1. the formation or expression of an opinion or theory without sufficient evidence for proof.
2. an opinion or theory so formed or expressed; speculation; surmise.
3. Obs. the interpretation of omens.
v.t.
4. to conclude or suppose from evidence insufficient to ensure reliability.
v.i.
5. to form conjectures.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin conjectūra inferring, reasoning =conject(us) past participle of conjicere to throw together, form a conclusion (con- con- + -jicere, comb. form of jacere to throw) + -ūra -ure]
con•jec′tur•a•ble, adj.
syn: See guess.

conjecture

- First meant "the interpretation of omens or signs" or "divination," and it literally means "to throw together," that is, to produce a theory by putting together a number of facts.
See also related terms for signs.

conjecture


Past participle: conjectured
Gerund: conjecturing

Imperative
conjecture
conjecture
Present
I conjecture
you conjecture
he/she/it conjectures
we conjecture
you conjecture
they conjecture
Preterite
I conjectured
you conjectured
he/she/it conjectured
we conjectured
you conjectured
they conjectured
Present Continuous
I am conjecturing
you are conjecturing
he/she/it is conjecturing
we are conjecturing
you are conjecturing
they are conjecturing
Present Perfect
I have conjectured
you have conjectured
he/she/it has conjectured
we have conjectured
you have conjectured
they have conjectured
Past Continuous
I was conjecturing
you were conjecturing
he/she/it was conjecturing
we were conjecturing
you were conjecturing
they were conjecturing
Past Perfect
I had conjectured
you had conjectured
he/she/it had conjectured
we had conjectured
you had conjectured
they had conjectured
Future
I will conjecture
you will conjecture
he/she/it will conjecture
we will conjecture
you will conjecture
they will conjecture
Future Perfect
I will have conjectured
you will have conjectured
he/she/it will have conjectured
we will have conjectured
you will have conjectured
they will have conjectured
Future Continuous
I will be conjecturing
you will be conjecturing
he/she/it will be conjecturing
we will be conjecturing
you will be conjecturing
they will be conjecturing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been conjecturing
you have been conjecturing
he/she/it has been conjecturing
we have been conjecturing
you have been conjecturing
they have been conjecturing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been conjecturing
you will have been conjecturing
he/she/it will have been conjecturing
we will have been conjecturing
you will have been conjecturing
they will have been conjecturing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been conjecturing
you had been conjecturing
he/she/it had been conjecturing
we had been conjecturing
you had been conjecturing
they had been conjecturing
Conditional
I would conjecture
you would conjecture
he/she/it would conjecture
we would conjecture
you would conjecture
they would conjecture
Past Conditional
I would have conjectured
you would have conjectured
he/she/it would have conjectured
we would have conjectured
you would have conjectured
they would have conjectured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conjecture - a hypothesis that has been formed by speculating or conjecturing (usually with little hard evidence); "speculations about the outcome of the election"; "he dismissed it as mere conjecture"
hypothesis, theory, possibility - a tentative insight into the natural world; a concept that is not yet verified but that if true would explain certain facts or phenomena; "a scientific hypothesis that survives experimental testing becomes a scientific theory"; "he proposed a fresh theory of alkalis that later was accepted in chemical practices"
2.conjecture - a message expressing an opinion based on incomplete evidenceconjecture - a message expressing an opinion based on incomplete evidence
opinion, view - a message expressing a belief about something; the expression of a belief that is held with confidence but not substantiated by positive knowledge or proof; "his opinions appeared frequently on the editorial page"
divination - successful conjecture by unusual insight or good luck
3.conjecture - reasoning that involves the formation of conclusions from incomplete evidence
abstract thought, logical thinking, reasoning - thinking that is coherent and logical
theorisation, theorization - the production or use of theories
supposal, supposition - the cognitive process of supposing
Verb1.conjecture - to believe especially on uncertain or tentative grounds; "Scientists supposed that large dinosaurs lived in swamps"
reconstruct, retrace, construct - reassemble mentally; "reconstruct the events of 20 years ago"
anticipate, expect - regard something as probable or likely; "The meteorologists are expecting rain for tomorrow"
formulate, explicate, develop - elaborate, as of theories and hypotheses; "Could you develop the ideas in your thesis"

conjecture

noun
1. guess, theory, fancy, notion, speculation, assumption, hypothesis, inference, presumption, surmise, theorizing, guesswork, supposition, shot in the dark, guesstimate (informal) Your assertion is merely a conjecture, not a fact.
verb
1. guess, speculate, surmise, theorize, suppose, imagine, assume, fancy, infer, hypothesize This may or may not be true; we are all conjecturing here.

conjecture

noun
1. Abstract reasoning:
2. A judgment, estimate, or opinion arrived at by guessing:
verb
To draw an inference on the basis of inconclusive evidence or insufficient information:
Translations
تَخْمين، ظَن، حَدَسِيَّهيُخَمِّن، يَظُن، يَحْزِر
dohaddomněnkadomýšlet seodhadovat
formodeformodninggættegætteri
arvausarveluotaksuma
sejtés
ágiskungiska á
numanomasnumanymasnumanytispėjamasspėjimas
minētpieņemtpieņēmumsvarbūtība
formodninggjetninggjettegjettinggjettverk
domyslieť si

conjecture

[kənˈdʒektʃəʳ]
A. N it's only conjectureson conjeturas, nada más
B. VTconjeturar
C. VIconjeturar

conjecture

[kənˈdʒɛktʃər]
nconjecture f
vtconjecturer
viconjecturer

conjecture

vtvermuten, mutmaßen (geh)
viVermutungen or Mutmaßungen anstellen, mutmaßen (geh); it was just as scientists had conjecturedes verhielt sich geradeso, wie es die Wissenschaftler gemutmaßt or vermutet hatten
nVermutung f, → Mutmaßung f (geh); what will come next is a matter of or for conjecturewas folgt, das kann man nur vermuten or das bleibt unserer Vermutung überlassen

conjecture

[kənˈdʒɛktʃəʳ]
1. ncongettura
2. vt & vi (frm) → congetturare

conjecture

(kənˈdʒektʃə) noun
(an) opinion formed on slight evidence; a guess. He made several conjectures about where his son might be.
verb
to guess.
conˈjectural adjective
References in classic literature ?
At each change in the evolutions of the latter, the former raised his tall person in the stirrups; producing, in this manner, by the undue elongation of his legs, such sudden growths and diminishings of the stature, as baffled every conjecture that might be made as to his dimensions.
Though neither of them could conjecture what was the cause of Cassy's fainting, still they made all the tumult which is proper in such cases;--George upsetting a wash-pitcher, and breaking two tumblers, in the warmth of his humanity; and various ladies in the cabin, hearing that somebody had fainted, crowded the state-room door, and kept out all the air they possibly could, so that, on the whole, everything was done that could be expected.
Why master was so careful of her, may be safely left to conjecture.
Emma saw him only once; but two or three times every day Harriet was sure just to meet with him, or just to miss him, just to hear his voice, or see his shoulder, just to have something occur to preserve him in her fancy, in all the favouring warmth of surprize and conjecture.
I can now conjecture readily that this streak of light was, in all likelihood, a gleam from a lantern carried by some one across the lawn: but then, prepared as my mind was for horror, shaken as my nerves were by agitation, I thought the swift darting beam was a herald of some coming vision from another world.
What her last illness was, I am not certain: I conjecture, they died of the same thing, a kind of fever, slow at its commencement, but incurable, and rapidly consuming life towards the close.
I should be much for open Warr, O Peers, As not behind in hate; if what was urg'd Main reason to perswade immediate Warr, Did not disswade me most, and seem to cast Ominous conjecture on the whole success: When he who most excels in fact of Arms, In what he counsels and in what excels Mistrustful, grounds his courage on despair And utter dissolution, as the scope Of all his aim, after some dire revenge.
This would be a circumstance, doubtless, totally unworthy to dwell in the memory of so rigid an anchorite; yet, I think, were you to search yonder crypt once more, you would find that I am right in my conjecture.
His agitation infected them, and when Agatha endeavored to reassure him by declaring that Smilash was a disguised gentleman, Miss Wilson, supposing this to be a mere repetition of her former idle conjecture, told her sharply to hold her tongue, as the time was not one for talking nonsense.
Often, on returning home from one of those mysterious and prolonged absences that gave rise to such strange conjecture among those who were his friends, or thought that they were so, he himself would creep upstairs to the locked room, open the door with the key that never left him now, and stand, with a mirror, in front of the portrait that Basil Hallward had painted of him, looking now at the evil and aging face on the canvas, and now at the fair young face that laughed back at him from the polished glass.
The author's conjecture on the name of the Red Sea.
I do not, of course, mean that there are not battles, conspiracies, tumults, factions, and all those other phenomena which are supposed to make History interesting; nor would I deny that the strange mixture of the problems of life and the problems of Mathematics, continually inducing conjecture and giving the opportunity of immediate verification, imparts to our existence a zest which you in Spaceland can hardly comprehend.