conjecture

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Related to conjecturing: surmises

con·jec·ture

 (kən-jĕk′chər)
n.
1. Opinion or judgment based on inconclusive or incomplete evidence; guesswork.
2. An opinion or conclusion based on guesswork: The commentators made various conjectures about the outcome of the next election.
v. con·jec·tured, con·jec·tur·ing, con·jec·tures
v.tr.
To judge or conclude by conjecture; guess: "From the comparative silence below ... I conjectured that Mr Rochester was now at liberty" (Charlotte Brontë).
v.intr.
To make a conjecture.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin coniectūra, from coniectus, past participle of conicere, to infer : com-, com- + iacere, to throw; see yē- in Indo-European roots.]

con·jec′tur·a·ble adj.
con·jec′tur·al adj.
con·jec′tur·al·ly adv.
con·jec′tur·er n.

conjecture

(kənˈdʒɛktʃə)
n
1. the formation of conclusions from incomplete evidence; guess
2. the inference or conclusion so formed
3. (Alternative Belief Systems) obsolete interpretation of occult signs
vb
to infer or arrive at (an opinion, conclusion, etc) from incomplete evidence
[C14: from Latin conjectūra an assembling of facts, from conjicere to throw together, from jacere to throw]
conˈjecturable adj
conˈjecturably adv
conˈjecturer n

con•jec•ture

(kənˈdʒɛk tʃər)

n., v. -tured, -tur•ing. n.
1. the formation or expression of an opinion or theory without sufficient evidence for proof.
2. an opinion or theory so formed or expressed; speculation; surmise.
3. Obs. the interpretation of omens.
v.t.
4. to conclude or suppose from evidence insufficient to ensure reliability.
v.i.
5. to form conjectures.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin conjectūra inferring, reasoning =conject(us) past participle of conjicere to throw together, form a conclusion (con- con- + -jicere, comb. form of jacere to throw) + -ūra -ure]
con•jec′tur•a•ble, adj.
syn: See guess.

conjecture

- First meant "the interpretation of omens or signs" or "divination," and it literally means "to throw together," that is, to produce a theory by putting together a number of facts.
See also related terms for signs.

conjecture


Past participle: conjectured
Gerund: conjecturing

Imperative
conjecture
conjecture
Present
I conjecture
you conjecture
he/she/it conjectures
we conjecture
you conjecture
they conjecture
Preterite
I conjectured
you conjectured
he/she/it conjectured
we conjectured
you conjectured
they conjectured
Present Continuous
I am conjecturing
you are conjecturing
he/she/it is conjecturing
we are conjecturing
you are conjecturing
they are conjecturing
Present Perfect
I have conjectured
you have conjectured
he/she/it has conjectured
we have conjectured
you have conjectured
they have conjectured
Past Continuous
I was conjecturing
you were conjecturing
he/she/it was conjecturing
we were conjecturing
you were conjecturing
they were conjecturing
Past Perfect
I had conjectured
you had conjectured
he/she/it had conjectured
we had conjectured
you had conjectured
they had conjectured
Future
I will conjecture
you will conjecture
he/she/it will conjecture
we will conjecture
you will conjecture
they will conjecture
Future Perfect
I will have conjectured
you will have conjectured
he/she/it will have conjectured
we will have conjectured
you will have conjectured
they will have conjectured
Future Continuous
I will be conjecturing
you will be conjecturing
he/she/it will be conjecturing
we will be conjecturing
you will be conjecturing
they will be conjecturing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been conjecturing
you have been conjecturing
he/she/it has been conjecturing
we have been conjecturing
you have been conjecturing
they have been conjecturing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been conjecturing
you will have been conjecturing
he/she/it will have been conjecturing
we will have been conjecturing
you will have been conjecturing
they will have been conjecturing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been conjecturing
you had been conjecturing
he/she/it had been conjecturing
we had been conjecturing
you had been conjecturing
they had been conjecturing
Conditional
I would conjecture
you would conjecture
he/she/it would conjecture
we would conjecture
you would conjecture
they would conjecture
Past Conditional
I would have conjectured
you would have conjectured
he/she/it would have conjectured
we would have conjectured
you would have conjectured
they would have conjectured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conjecture - a hypothesis that has been formed by speculating or conjecturing (usually with little hard evidence); "speculations about the outcome of the election"; "he dismissed it as mere conjecture"
hypothesis, theory, possibility - a tentative insight into the natural world; a concept that is not yet verified but that if true would explain certain facts or phenomena; "a scientific hypothesis that survives experimental testing becomes a scientific theory"; "he proposed a fresh theory of alkalis that later was accepted in chemical practices"
2.conjecture - a message expressing an opinion based on incomplete evidenceconjecture - a message expressing an opinion based on incomplete evidence
opinion, view - a message expressing a belief about something; the expression of a belief that is held with confidence but not substantiated by positive knowledge or proof; "his opinions appeared frequently on the editorial page"
divination - successful conjecture by unusual insight or good luck
3.conjecture - reasoning that involves the formation of conclusions from incomplete evidence
abstract thought, logical thinking, reasoning - thinking that is coherent and logical
theorisation, theorization - the production or use of theories
supposal, supposition - the cognitive process of supposing
Verb1.conjecture - to believe especially on uncertain or tentative grounds; "Scientists supposed that large dinosaurs lived in swamps"
reconstruct, retrace, construct - reassemble mentally; "reconstruct the events of 20 years ago"
anticipate, expect - regard something as probable or likely; "The meteorologists are expecting rain for tomorrow"
formulate, explicate, develop - elaborate, as of theories and hypotheses; "Could you develop the ideas in your thesis"

conjecture

noun
1. guess, theory, fancy, notion, speculation, assumption, hypothesis, inference, presumption, surmise, theorizing, guesswork, supposition, shot in the dark, guesstimate (informal) Your assertion is merely a conjecture, not a fact.
verb
1. guess, speculate, surmise, theorize, suppose, imagine, assume, fancy, infer, hypothesize This may or may not be true; we are all conjecturing here.

conjecture

noun
1. Abstract reasoning:
2. A judgment, estimate, or opinion arrived at by guessing:
verb
To draw an inference on the basis of inconclusive evidence or insufficient information:
Translations
تَخْمين، ظَن، حَدَسِيَّهيُخَمِّن، يَظُن، يَحْزِر
dohaddomněnkadomýšlet seodhadovat
formodeformodninggættegætteri
arvausarveluotaksuma
sejtés
ágiskungiska á
numanomasnumanymasnumanytispėjamasspėjimas
minētpieņemtpieņēmumsvarbūtība
formodninggjetninggjettegjettinggjettverk
domyslieť si

conjecture

[kənˈdʒektʃəʳ]
A. N it's only conjectureson conjeturas, nada más
B. VTconjeturar
C. VIconjeturar

conjecture

[kənˈdʒɛktʃər]
nconjecture f
vtconjecturer
viconjecturer

conjecture

vtvermuten, mutmaßen (geh)
viVermutungen or Mutmaßungen anstellen, mutmaßen (geh); it was just as scientists had conjecturedes verhielt sich geradeso, wie es die Wissenschaftler gemutmaßt or vermutet hatten
nVermutung f, → Mutmaßung f (geh); what will come next is a matter of or for conjecturewas folgt, das kann man nur vermuten or das bleibt unserer Vermutung überlassen

conjecture

[kənˈdʒɛktʃəʳ]
1. ncongettura
2. vt & vi (frm) → congetturare

conjecture

(kənˈdʒektʃə) noun
(an) opinion formed on slight evidence; a guess. He made several conjectures about where his son might be.
verb
to guess.
conˈjectural adjective
References in classic literature ?
What nonsense one talks, Miss Woodhouse, when hard at work, if one talks at all;your real workmen, I suppose, hold their tongues; but we gentlemen labourers if we get hold of a wordMiss Fairfax said something about conjecturing.
Soon after I heard a general shout, with frequent repetitions of the words PEPLOM SELAN; and I felt great numbers of people on my left side relaxing the cords to such a degree, that I was able to turn upon my right, and to ease myself with making water; which I very plentifully did, to the great astonishment of the people; who, conjecturing by my motion what I was going to do, immediately opened to the right and left on that side, to avoid the torrent, which fell with such noise and violence from me.
The Knight of the Rueful Countenance was still very anxious to find out who the owner of the valise could be, conjecturing from the sonnet and letter, from the money in gold, and from the fineness of the shirts, that he must be some lover of distinction whom the scorn and cruelty of his lady had driven to some desperate course; but as in that uninhabited and rugged spot there was no one to be seen of whom he could inquire, he saw nothing else for it but to push on, taking whatever road Rocinante chose- which was where he could make his way- firmly persuaded that among these wilds he could not fail to meet some rare adventure.
The rest of the evening was spent in conjecturing how soon he would return Mr.
There were grounds for conjecturing, that Sir Edmund Andros intended at once to strike terror by a parade of military force, and to confound the opposite faction by possessing himself of their chief.
Oh, I see; you want to go to court," said Newman, vaguely conjecturing that she might wish him to appeal to the United States legation to smooth her way to the imperial halls.
His ultimate intention, if he had any, she had not yet divined; and she found herself conjecturing on the matter as a third person might have done.
Why he had done it, what could have provoked him to such a breach of hospitality, and so suddenly turned all his partial regard for their daughter into actual ill will, was a matter which they were at least as far from divining as Catherine herself; but it did not oppress them by any means so long; and, after a due course of useless conjecture, that "it was a strange business, and that he must be a very strange man," grew enough for all their indignation and wonder; though Sarah indeed still indulged in the sweets of incomprehensibility, exclaiming and conjecturing with youthful ardour.