conniver


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con·nive

 (kə-nīv′)
intr.v. con·nived, con·niv·ing, con·nives
1. To cooperate secretly in an illegal or wrongful action; collude: The dealers connived with customs officials to bring in narcotics.
2. To scheme; plot.
3. To feign ignorance of or fail to take measures against a wrong, thus implying tacit encouragement or consent: The guards were suspected of conniving at the prisoner's escape.

[Latin cōnīvēre, connīvēre, to close the eyes.]

con·niv′er n.
con·niv′er·y n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Peerless motivator and tactician, unscrupulous conniver and provocateur.
He convincingly depicts Best as a self-promoting conniver who, in his rivalry with his nemesis, General Hanneken, miscalculated the serious consequences of rounding up Denmark's Jews.
Eddie, sweet-talking, ever-quipping, smart-alec conniver, ends up married and in federal prison-- "okay a minimum-security unit, but still in jail" (307).
Richard and Buckingham's failure to settle on a single or continuous interpretation of the Queen's motives works in their favor, for in asking the council to imagine the Queen as a willful conniver and as a woman out of her mind with fear and as a thief hoarding stolen property, they essentially ask too much.
Nearly a third of the book is taken up with a tedious account of the misadventures of his father, also Ferdinand, a prig, zealot and conniver so infatuated with 'old-school' Presbyterian accommodation to slavery that he scorned Abraham Lincoln and voted for the racist, nativist Know-Nothing party.
Nonetheless, Turabi as the conniver of old, a stubborn old veteran, his trawl is never empty.
Patrick and Anderson are also a potent match as the actor and the conniver sharing a bottle and second-guessing each other.
When Raymond Chandler points to Hollywood writers who, under the pressure of required "personal and artistic subordination," find themselves "becoming little by little a conniver rather than a creator," he is talking about implied authors who are far less skilled than real authors (120).
In the betrayer-betrayed relationship, one party is the stalker, charmer, conniver, and selfish destroyer; the other is the one who trusts, is altruistic, has a desire to feel and be secure, and whose guard is completely down.
Reigning Gallic heartthrob Romain Duris ("The Beat That My Heart Skipped") plays Moliere as an amoral conniver and a pretentious twit -- but also as a consummate actor and plot-weaver of quick, incipient genius.
Gates the coward, Gates the conniver, Gates the disgrace.
Like Franklin Roosevelt, Lincoln was a consummate fence-straddling politician--a conniver, manipulator, and liar.